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Nominate the Vermont Chamber of Commerce “Citizen of the Year”

first_imgDo you know someone who continuously steps forward to help advance and strengthen our Vermont communities? Your ideal civic leader could be the next person to be honored with the statewide Vermont Chamber Citizen of the Year Award.Presented annually for nearly four decades, the Citizen of the Year award is given to a person who: 1) Has made major contributions to the betterment of Vermont; 2) Has distinguished himself or herself through outstanding service to the community; and 3) Typifies the true spirit of service and self-sacrifice in representing the finest ideal of Vermont Citizenship.The 2003 Citizen of the Year will be honored with a special recognition banquet in the fall. The application includes a nomination form, a brief biographical sketch of the nominee, and supporting testimonials. A Selection Committee comprised of Vermont Chamber Board Members and past award winners will select the winner.Last year’s Vermont Chamber Citizen of the Year was The Honorable Barbara W. Snelling. Other past winners include Judge Sterry Waterman (1983), Martha H. O’Connor (1994), Sister Elizabeth Candon (1985), Governor Thomas P. Salmon (1996), Francis G.W. Voigt (2000), and Diane P. Mueller (2001).Please contact Vicky Tebbetts, Vermont Chamber Vice President of Communications, with any questions or to receive a nomination form. (vtebbetts@vtchamber.com(link sends e-mail), 802-223-3443 ext 123). The deadline for nominations is July 15, 2003.last_img read more

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Champlain College students work for state trade partnership

first_imgBURLINGTON, Vt.–Champlain College students Heather Littlefield, Anna Wisniewska, Alina Stanciu and Emily Howland have been working atthe Vermont Global Trade Partnership (VGTP) during the spring 2007 semester. These Champlain College students earned their internships through a competitive interview process.Vermont business people access a broad range of trade services through the VGTP, a state program which has established an office in the S.D. Ireland Family Center for Global Business and Technology on the Champlain College campus. Champlain offers the only International Business program in the state of Vermont.Businesses can receive assistance with: reviewing trade regulations, tariffs and logistics, researching new markets, importing and exporting, product sourcing, trade missions, overseas trade shows, and networking opportunities.Additionally, student Emily Howland is doing a four-month internship in Shanghai, China. She is an intern at the Shanghai Small Enterprise Trade Development Center, promoting international business relationships. Howland is no stranger to China, having studied for four years in Beijing. She is a fluent speaker of the Chinese dialect of Mandarin. Howland is sharing her experience in China via a student blog.Prior to this spring internship, she has been continuing her role as lead research assistant for the Vermont Global Trade Partnership. In November, she accompanied a Vermont delegation on a trade mission to China and assisted as an interpreter. More recently, she organized Vermont’s participation in the American Education Fairs in Taiwan. She also hosted a tourism representative from China and toured her around Vermont.”I’m looking forward to getting experience in working in a Chinese office,” she said. “It’s a similar organization to where I work now — I’ll just see things from the other side.” Howland grew up in Richmond, Vt. and is a graduate of Mt. Mansfield Union High School.Littlefield, from Morrisville, Vt., is a graduate of People’s Academy. She is finishing her bachelor’s degree in International Business and she brings retail experience to the VGTP, including shipping and receiving responsibilities for textiles. With the VGTP, she performs research in areas that include sourcing and distributor searches, as well as regulatory market reports.Wisniewska is a native of Poland. She is a Business and Management major who also brings human resources and accounting knowledge to the internship.Stanciu is from Romania and she is an International Business student. Stanciu is helping the VGTP investigate new business opportunities in Romania and Bulgaria — which are new members of the European Union.last_img read more

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UVM among NASA education research program award recipients

first_imgNASA has awarded approximately $19 million to colleges and universities nationwide to conduct research and technology development in areas of importance to NASA’s mission. The University of Vermont was among six schools to be selected for two proposals. In addition, the awards enable faculty development and higher education student support.The selections are part of NASA’s Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research, known as EPSCoR. The program is designed to assist states in establishing an academic research enterprise directed toward a long-term, self-sustaining and competitive capability that will contribute to its economic viability and development. The program helps develop partnerships between NASA research assets, academic institutions and industry. The selected proposals support all four of NASA’s mission directorates: aeronautics, exploration systems, science and space operations.A total of 27 proposals were selected from organizations in Alabama, Arkansas, Hawaii, Idaho, Iowa, Kansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Montana, Nebraska, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Puerto Rico, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Utah, Vermont and West Virginia.Two proposals were selected from each of the following colleges and universities:New Mexico State UniversitySouth Dakota School of Mines & TechnologyUniversity of Alabama In HuntsvilleUniversity of Nebraska at OmahaUniversity of Puerto RicoUniversity of Vermont & State Agricultural CollegeWichita State University, KansasOne proposal was selected from each of the following organizations:College of Charleston, South CarolinaLouisiana Board of Regents FoundationMontana State UniversityUniversity of Arkansas at Little RockUniversity of Hawaii SystemsUniversity of IdahoUniversity of MississippiUniversity of North DakotaUniversity of Northern IowaUniversity of OklahomaUniversity of UtahVanderbilt UniversityWest Virginia UniversityProposals were chosen through a merit-based, peer-reviewed competition. The maximum award is $750,000 for a 3-year period. A one-to-one match of funds is required for every NASA dollar awarded.This program and the agency’s other education programs support NASA’s commitment to excellence in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, which will play a key role in preparing, inspiring, encouraging and nurturing the nation’s future workforce.For a list of project descriptions, click on “Selected Proposals” and look for “Competitive Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR)” or solicitation NNH09ZNE002C at:http://nspires.nasaprs.com(link is external)For additional information about NASA’s EPSCoR program, visit:http://www.nasa.gov/education/epscor(link is external)For information about NASA’s Education programs, visit:http://www.nasa.gov(link is external)last_img read more

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Companies in VOSHA’s Green Mountain Voluntary Protection Programs perform better than national average

first_imgCompanies enrolled in the VOSHA Green Mountain Voluntary Protection Programs (GMVPP) have, once again, performed at a higher level than the national average of their peers in the area of reportable jobsite injuries and illnesses, as reported by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), Incidence rates of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses by industry and case types, 2008.In the latest 2008 BLS report, two important performance measures are tracked and compared to the North American Industrial Classification Code System (NAICS) for each industry type. The first is the industry Total Case Incident Rate (TCIR). This rate is a reflection of the worksite s total recordable cases in a calendar year. The second is the Days Away Restricted and/or Transferred rate (DART). This rate reflects the number of recordable cases in a calendar year that result in an employee missing time from work or having to perform duties which are not their normal jobsite duties due to the injury or illness. These rates are reflected in a percentage per 1000 employees in a particular NAICS industry type.For the 2009 calendar year all of the employers recognized by the GMVPP have outperformed the latest injury and illness statistics. The following are the performance numbers listed as a percentage below the related BLS average for their respective industries.Ben and Jerry s Homemade, Saint Albans Manufacturing FacilityTCIR 64% DART 52%United Water NACO, Saint Johnsbury Waste Water Treatment FacilityTCIR 100%, No recordable cases DART 100%, No recordable casesEnergizer Battery, Bennington Manufacturing FacilityTCIR 61% DART 88%Energizer Battery, Saint Albans Manufacturing FacilityTCIR 30% DART 16%G.E. Aviation, Rutland ManufacturingTCIR 31% DART 42%IBM, Essex JunctionTCIR 31% DART 17%Entergy Nuclear Vermont Yankee, VernonTCIR 60% DART 100%, No recordable casesVermont Agency of Transportation, District 7, Saint JohnsburyTCIR 58% DART 100%, No recordable casesThe GMVPP is a VOSHA partnership program that recognizes worksites with exemplary safety and health management systems in place. Those systems are based on four core values: 1) Management Commitment and Employee Involvement; 2) Worksite Hazard Assessment; 3) Hazard Prevention and Control; and 4) Employee Safety and Health Training.last_img read more

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Greensburg Wind Farm named ‘Wind Project of the Year’

first_imgSOUTH BURLINGTON, Vt., March 9, 2011 /PRNewswire/ — NativeEnergy Inc,The Greensburg Wind Farm in Greensburg, KS, has been named “Wind Project of the Year” by RenewableEnergyWorld.com, a leading renewable energy publication. This award recognizes the project’s community benefits and unique financing model.Jeff Bernicke, president of NativeEnergy of South Burlington, accepted the award at the Renewable Energy World Conference and Expo in Tampa, Florida.RenewableEnergyWorld.com said: “To recognize the perseverance of the people of Greensburg, Kansas, and the leadership of companies involved in developing and marketing the project, the 12.5 MW Greensburg Wind Farm is the 2011 ‘Wind Project of the Year.'”In May 2007, a massive tornado leveled Greensburg, destroying 95% of the town. In the face of this tragedy, the citizens of Greensburg decided to rebuild as “the greenest town in America.” This plan’spearheaded by non-profit Greensburg GreenTown’included construction of the Greensburg Wind Farm.The wind farm was financed in part through NativeEnergy’s innovative Help Buildâ ¢ carbon offsets. By purchasing Help Buildâ ¢ offsets, companies and individuals across the U.S. provided critical upfront funding for project construction. In return, they received a share of the project’s long-term verified greenhouse gas reductions. Major project supporters included: Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Ben & Jerry’s, Brighter Planet, Stonyfield, CLIF Bar, Aveda, Clean Air-Cool Planet, and Reverb.”When NativeEnergy first brought the Greensburg Wind Farm to us, we were excited to be early supporters,” said Paul Comey, vice president of Environmental Affairs at GMCR, Inc. “Upon visiting the site and meeting the community, we realized we could make a difference. By purchasing carbon offsets from the project, we are mitigating our carbon footprint while helping Greensburg along its journey to become the greenest community in America.””I’ve seen first-hand the tremendous progress that the people of Greensburg have made in their commitment to becoming a truly green community, so being awarded ‘Wind Project of the Year’ is a fitting recognition,” said Chuck Bennett, vice president of Earth & Community Care at Aveda. “This tremendous honor reinforces my belief that Aveda’s support for the community and the wind project has been very well founded.”Jeff Bernicke, president of NativeEnergy, noted, “We are honored that the Greensburg Wind Farm has been named ‘Wind Project of the Year.’ This project demonstrates that well-planned environmental initiatives can have local economic and social advantages too. This was truly a community project’from the way it was financed to the benefits it offers.”The project, which began operating in March 2010, consists of 10 new wind turbines, 1.25 MW each. The project developer, owner, and operator is Exelon Wind, LLC (formerly John Deere Renewables, LLC). The wind farm’s exceptional community benefits include job creation, lease revenues for local farmers, and greenhouse gas reductions. It is expected to reduce nearly one half million metric tonnes of carbon dioxide over its 20 year life.For more information about the Greensburg Wind Farm, visithttp://www.nativeenergy.com/pages/greensburg/517.php(link is external).About Native EnergyNativeEnergy is a leading provider of verified carbon offsets and renewable energy credits. NativeEnergy’s Help Buildâ ¢ carbon offsets help finance the construction of Native American, family farm, and community-based carbon reduction projects. For more information, visit: www.nativeenergy.com(link is external). last_img read more

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Farmers get inspired at 30th NOFA conference

first_imgThe Northeast Organic Farming Association of Vermont (NOFA-VT) Winter Conference has long been a key educational and inspirational gathering for Vermont’s farmers. The 30th annual conference, taking place February 10-12, 2012 at the University of Vermont in Burlington will be no exception ‘ with extra emphasis on the inspiration.After a particularly challenging year, Vermont’s growers are looking forward to the opportunity to exchange ideas, learn new techniques, and create connections. The NOFA-VT Winter Conference brings together farmers, educators, researchers, and more to build knowledge and tackle hard questions ‘ like how to create a vibrant and resilient food system in the face of climate change and a struggling economy.On Saturday, keynote speaker and local extension expert Vern Grubinger will share his vision of the future of Vermont’s food system. ‘The resilience of Vermont’s food system is challenged by many factors, including climate change and weather extremes, reliance on fossil fuel, loss of good farmland, and consolidation of food processing, distribution and retailing,’ says Grubinger. ‘Strategies for addressing these challenges are emerging as part of an ongoing transformation in how people think about food. This presentation will highlight some of these strategies and the farms involved with them, celebrating the progress being made and suggesting new actions for the future.’Over 30 of the weekend’s workshops are intended for commercial farmers and will cover topics such as Produce Safety, Farm Finance, Flood Recovery, Alternative Energy, Pasture Management and much more. In addition, day-long seminars on Friday will address Advanced Orchard Health for Sustainable Fruit Production, Nose-to-Tail Butchery, Organic Beekeeping, Renewable Energy Options, and Weed Management in a Wetter, Warmer Climate.About NOFA Vermont: NOFA Vermont is member-based organization working to grow local farms, healthy food, and strong communities in Vermont. Our members are farmers, gardeners, educators and food lovers of all sorts ‘ anyone who wants to help us create a future full of local food and local farms. Our programs include farmer and gardener technical assistance, farm to school support, organic certification, advocacy, an online apprentice and farm worker directory, an annual Winter Conference, and programs that work to ensure access to fresh, local food to all Vermonters, regardless of income.last_img read more