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Notre Dame seniors react to change in commencement speaker

first_imgIn a change that pleased many Notre Dame seniors, Rev. Ray Hammond will deliver the 169th Commencement address instead of Lord Christopher Patten, the chancellor of the University of Oxford and chair of the BBC Trust, the University announced in a press release May 1. Hammond, a Philadelphia native, founded Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Boston. He entered Harvard College at age 15, graduated with a bachelor’s degree at 19 and earned his medical degree at 23, according to the press release.Senior Lucy Smith said she thought Hammond would be a better speaker than Patten would have been.“Originally the speaker, Christopher Patten, sounded cool but entirely not relatable to a good portion of our student body,” Smith said. “He was a wealthy, Catholic, British man who had a sparkly resume of success and power, but was also very old and past his prime. “When the news came out, no one really cared. However, when they announced the new speaker, Ray Hammond, there was a shift in campus-wide support.”Smith said Hammond’s experience using his “brilliance” to graduate at a young age from Harvard and serving his community through hands-on work would allow him to speak about issues relevant and significant to the graduating class.“He has done work with the people of Boston to end gang violence,” she said. “That’s pretty darn cool, and applicable to many people in our class. “While Lord Patten is accomplished, Reverend Hammond is doing the work of God in the streets. He actively goes into the streets and tries to help people in need, people who are avoided by most. “He recognizes the importance of the dignity of each human person, and I think our class could use and would love to hear and be inspired by that sort of spirit before we go out into the real world. While he might not be the premier Catholic man in England, Rev. Hammond is spreading the love of God through action to those who need it. That is the sort of message I want to hear.”Senior Ben Finan said Patten spoke two years ago in Geddes Hall about Oxford and his time as the last British governor of Hong Kong. Finan said he regretted Patten could not attend but looked forward to hearing Hammond speak.“Although I am sad to see Lord Patten fall ill and become unable to make it after I heard him speak two years ago, Ray Hammond seems to be a fantastic replacement,” Finan said. “As an incredibly accomplished man—both a medical doctor and a preacher, he is an inspiration to our rising generation. “I hope that Rev. Dr. Hammond will discuss what drove him to such revolutionary ideals, as well as offering some level of advice on what remains to be accomplished.”Senior Antoinette Pusateri, a biology and theology double major, said Hammond’s experience between medicine and faith-based ministry particularly interested her.“As a doctor-to-be myself, I am excited to hear Dr. Hammond speak of how his medical career, but moreover, his Christian faith, informs the way he lives his life,” she said. “But surely his advice will transcend all majors, and remind us of our mission as Notre Dame alumni to heal, unify, and enlighten the world around us according to our abilities.”The University announced in March that Hammond will receive an honorary degree in humane letters at this year’s Commencement ceremony. Patten canceled his speech at Notre Dame, as well as several other engagements, for health reasons, vice president for public affairs and communications Paul Browne told The Observer. “We are disappointed that Lord Patten will be unable to join us and will keep him in our prayers,” University President Fr. John Jenkins said in the press release. “At the same time, we are delighted and grateful that Rev. Ray Hammond has accepted our invitation to address the class of 2014.“His life’s story and work are an inspiration, and I know he will provide our graduates with a powerful address.”Browne said Jenkins’ personal interactions with Hammond played a role in the decision.“Fr. John had met [Hammond] personally and was impressed with his spiritual demeanor as well as his life’s accomplishments and thought he would deliver a powerful message to the students,” Browne said.Hammond worked as a doctor before turning to ministry in 1976 and earned a Master of Arts degree in the Study of Religion (Christian and Medical Ethics) at Harvard Graduate School of Arts and Sciences in 1982, the release said.Hammond served as the former chair of the Boston Foundation and founder and chairman of the Ten Point Coalition, which the release described as “an ecumenical group of Christian clergy and lay leaders behind Boston’s successful efforts to quell gang violence in the 1990s.”He also has served as executive director of Bethel’s Generation Excel program, executive committee member of the Black Ministerial Alliance, chair of the Boston Opportunity Agenda and a member of the Strategy Team for the Greater Boston Interfaith Organization, the release said. Beyond that, he is a trustee of the Yawkey Foundation, the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, the John F. Kennedy Library Foundation and the Math and Technology Charter High School.Tags: 2014 Commencement, Christopher Patten, Commencement Speaker, Ray Hammond, speakerlast_img read more

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Freeze risk

first_imgBy David Emory StooksburyUniversity ofGeorgiaAthens, Ga. — Compared to recentwinters, the probability of a damaging freeze is higher in early2004 across most of Georgia. This higher freeze risk is becauseof current and expected atmospheric-oceanic patterns.Atmospheric-oceanic patterns have a major influence on the typeof winter we have in the Southeast. The best known large-scaleatmospheric-oceanic pattern is El Nino. Under the El Ninopattern, much of Georgia has a wetter-than-normal winter.The opposite pattern is called La Nina. During a La Nina winter,much of the Southeast is drier than normal.Both El Nino and La Nina patterns tend to keep extremely cold airfrom making it from Canada into the deep South. Thus, damagingfreezes are less likely during El Nino and La Nina winters.No protectionThis winter, though, the atmospheric-oceanic system is in theneutral pattern. It’s neither El Nino nor La Nina. During winterswith the neutral pattern, extremely cold air from Canada isusually able to invade the Southeast.This extremely cold air can cause significant freeze-relateddamage. Between periods of very cold air, the Southeast shouldhave periods of relatively warm air.Across extremely south and coastal Georgia, the likelihood oftemperatures below 20 degrees this winter is at least one andhalf times greater than we would expect during an El Nino or LaNina winter.Across much of Georgia, the probability of temperatures below 14degrees is at least one and half times greater than we wouldexpect during an El Nino on La Nina winter. Temperatures around14 and below can cause extreme damage to Georgia winter crops,especially onions.Maps and detailed expectations concerning the extreme freezeprobabilities may be found on the Web at www.coaps.fsu.edu/climate_center/frz04.html.The extreme freeze probability analysis and maps were produced bythe Southeast Climate Consortium. The consortium is an outreachand research cooperative between the University of Georgia,Florida State University, University of Florida, University ofMiami and the University of Alabama at Huntsville.(David Emory Stooksbury is the State Climatologist of Georgia anda professor of engineering and atmospheric sciences in theUniversity of Georgia College of Agricultural and EnvironmentalSciences.)last_img read more

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UVM among NASA education research program award recipients

first_imgNASA has awarded approximately $19 million to colleges and universities nationwide to conduct research and technology development in areas of importance to NASA’s mission. The University of Vermont was among six schools to be selected for two proposals. In addition, the awards enable faculty development and higher education student support.The selections are part of NASA’s Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research, known as EPSCoR. The program is designed to assist states in establishing an academic research enterprise directed toward a long-term, self-sustaining and competitive capability that will contribute to its economic viability and development. The program helps develop partnerships between NASA research assets, academic institutions and industry. The selected proposals support all four of NASA’s mission directorates: aeronautics, exploration systems, science and space operations.A total of 27 proposals were selected from organizations in Alabama, Arkansas, Hawaii, Idaho, Iowa, Kansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Montana, Nebraska, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Puerto Rico, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Utah, Vermont and West Virginia.Two proposals were selected from each of the following colleges and universities:New Mexico State UniversitySouth Dakota School of Mines & TechnologyUniversity of Alabama In HuntsvilleUniversity of Nebraska at OmahaUniversity of Puerto RicoUniversity of Vermont & State Agricultural CollegeWichita State University, KansasOne proposal was selected from each of the following organizations:College of Charleston, South CarolinaLouisiana Board of Regents FoundationMontana State UniversityUniversity of Arkansas at Little RockUniversity of Hawaii SystemsUniversity of IdahoUniversity of MississippiUniversity of North DakotaUniversity of Northern IowaUniversity of OklahomaUniversity of UtahVanderbilt UniversityWest Virginia UniversityProposals were chosen through a merit-based, peer-reviewed competition. The maximum award is $750,000 for a 3-year period. A one-to-one match of funds is required for every NASA dollar awarded.This program and the agency’s other education programs support NASA’s commitment to excellence in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, which will play a key role in preparing, inspiring, encouraging and nurturing the nation’s future workforce.For a list of project descriptions, click on “Selected Proposals” and look for “Competitive Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR)” or solicitation NNH09ZNE002C at:http://nspires.nasaprs.com(link is external)For additional information about NASA’s EPSCoR program, visit:http://www.nasa.gov/education/epscor(link is external)For information about NASA’s Education programs, visit:http://www.nasa.gov(link is external)last_img read more

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Crushing win for Scots

first_imgScotland hammered the Faroe Islands 9-0 in Motherwell to keep the pressure on at the top of Group 4 in the Women’s World Cup qualifying round. Press Association Substitute Stephanie Roche scored an injury-time winner as the Republic of Ireland kept their qualification hopes alive with a 1-0 win in Slovakia. Northern Ireland’s miserable campaign continued, however, as they were thrashed 4-0 by Poland. center_img Jane Ross hit a hat-trick, Rachel Corsie scored twice while Kim Little, Caroline Weir, Leanne Crichton and Jennifer Beattie completed the rout. To have a chance of topping the group and qualifying automatically, Scotland will need to beat Sweden in their final group match on Wednesday. last_img read more

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#Donkomi: Ghana U-20 star Sabit Abdulai joins Getafe on a season-long loan

first_imgThe 21-year-old joins the Barcelona-based club following an impressive season at Extremadura where he featured primarily for the Team B.He played a total of 26 games for the Spanish second-tier club, playing 22 games for the Team B and four games for the first team during the 2019/2020 season.He scored one goal for the first team in the process.The central midfielder played a key part in Ghana’s U-20 exploits in Niger where he played all three games for the Black Starlets. Ghanaian international, Sabit Abdulai has joined Getafe CF from Extremadura UD on a season-long deal for the 2020/2021 season.last_img