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Title IX

first_imgAlthough most people believe Title IX was created to equalize women’s opportunity in sports, it was actually brought into law by the 92nd U.S. Congress on June 23, 1972, to give women in the work place equal opportunities. The law was introduced by Indiana’s Senator Birch Bayh. Patsy Mink of Hawaii, a U.S. Representative, did a lot of the preliminary work. She and many other women were concerned that women were being passed over in large numbers by the federal government when job opportunities occurred. The most publicity for Title IX has come in the area of sports. Since its inception, women’s participation in high school has increased 9 fold. Indiana first allowed women to participate like their male counterparts in 1976. Indiana actually had teams which were part of the IHSAA and not just the GAA (Girls Athletic Association). GAA was strictly intramural. Today Title IX not only means equal participation, but equal opportunity in every sense of the word. If you have a men’s team, you must have a women’s team–except for the obvious such as football. Today, in theory, women are to be paid the same as their male counterparts. I am not certain just how close this part of the law is being followed. There are still many cases that crop up, and many have nothing to do with participation. For example, sexual harassment has become part of Title IX cases as well as bullying. Many colleges are fighting some of these aspects saying that it is reducing men’s opportunity to participate now. What has occurred is when money is short the colleges reach Title IX equality by cutting out sports for both men & women. I think all will agree that for the most part Title IX has allowed women a much more level playing field.last_img read more

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Syracuse’s next opponent: What to know about St. Bonaventure

first_img Published on December 27, 2018 at 5:41 pm Contact Billy: wmheyen@syr.edu | @Wheyen3 Facebook Twitter Google+ Syracuse (8-4) closes out its nonconference schedule against another in-state foe, St. Bonaventure (4-8). The Bonnies defeated the Orange in the Carrier Dome a year ago, but St. Bonaventure is a much different team than it was when it upset SU. Syracuse enters off a win over Arkansas State, while SBU has lost three in-a-row.Here’s what to know before the 2 p.m. tip off on Saturday.All-time series: Syracuse leads, 24-4Last time they played: On Dec. 22, 2017, Syracuse and St. Bonaventure played a low-scoring game into an overtime period. The Bonnies won, 60-57, in a game that hinged on a late Oshae Brissett charge call. The Orange had their usual three in double figures that day: Frank Howard, Brissett and Tyus Battle. The Bonnies were led by Jaylen Adams’ 23 points. Adams left the Bonnies last year for the NBA.The St. Bonaventure report: The Bonnies are led by 6-foot-5 senior forward, Courtney Stockard. He leads SBU in scoring, at 19.0 points per game, and with 6.5 rebounds per game. After missing the first six games of the season with an injury, Stockard’s return has made him a focal point of the Bonnies’ attack. Guards Jalen Poyser and Kyle Lofton also average double-digits and shoot well from beyond the arc. Off the bench, Nelson Kaputo will also play sizable minutes and space the floor, as he’s hit 20 3s this season.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textIn addition to Lofton, the Bonnies’ freshman class is led by the play of 6-foot-10 Osun Osunniyi. He leads SBU with 31 blocks, almost three per game. Osunniyi splits time with another 6-foot-10 player, Amadi Ikpeze, but Ikpeze doesn’t pose as a shot-blocking threat like Osunniyi. The Bonnies shoot the 3 at 35.7 percent, above the national average per Kenpom.com, but shoot below 50 percent from 2-point range. They have a top-100 defense in the country, and four players have double-digit steals this season. Also, the Bonnies rank 79th in the nation in free-throw percentage, at 73.1 percent, which could be important if the two play another slow-it-down contest.How Syracuse beats St. Bonaventure: Finish at the rim. It won’t necessarily be an easy task, as Osunniyi is one of the nation’s top shot blockers. Even with him on the bench, Ikpeze provides another stout presence inside. And the Orange don’t always show perfection at the rim, with Brissett often failing to finish on strong drives and Paschal Chukwu and Bourama Sidibe shaky near the basket. But as SU eventually showed against Arkansas State, it has players that can break down average man-to-man defenders, which leads to looks inside. To win, the Orange will simply have to finish.In addition, the Bonnies will look to remain in the game with perimeter shooting against SU’s 2-3 zone, and the Orange will have to stop players from getting hot. Multiple mid-major guards — Cornell’s Matt Morgan, Morehead State’s Jordan Walker and Buffalo’s CJ Massinburg — kept their teams close against SU with strong 3-point shooting. Syracuse will have to be sure that Stockard, Poyser and Kaputo, among others, are held in check from deep.Stat to know: 15.1 percent – Osun Osunniyi’s block percentage, per Kenpom.com, the ratio of field-goal attempts while he’s on the floor that he blocksKenPom odds: Syracuse is given an 88 percent chance to win, by a 69-56 scorePlayer to watch: Courtney Stockard, forward, No. 11Stockard missed two full seasons with foot injuries after transferring to St. Bonaventure from a junior college. He scored 26 points in SBU’s NCAA Tournament win over UCLA last spring. The junior even helps run a non-profit organization, TruVision, with some friends from the St. Louis area. On Saturday against Syracuse, he’ll add a prolific inside-outside game that’s seen him hit multiple 3s in each of SBU’s last three games while grabbing at least six rebounds in each, as well. A year ago, he scored seven points with six rebounds and five assists in the Bonnies’ upset win. This year, he’ll be the go-to option. Commentslast_img read more

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John Painstil seeks special dispensation to coach Wa All Stars

first_imgWa All Stars head coach, John Paintsil, has admitted that he needs to get a special dispensation from the Ghana FA to help him get the required certification in order to help him coach in the Ghana Premier League.His statement follows the recent decision by the FA to insist on only coaches with CAF License A certificates in the Ghana Premier League.The FA says the rule forms part of the club licensing policy aimed at setting standards for the league and by extension, raising the quality of the local game.Painstil in an interview with Angel FM’s Michael Darko on Tuesday said that he would have to speak with the Ghana FA to plan the way forward in terms of his coaching career in the Ghana Premier League.“I will find a way to sort things out with the Ghana FA. I would like to request for a year to get the licence A because I have already started working with Wa All Stars.However, I am fortunate to have my assistant coach, Walid, and the goalkeeper’s trainer with me and they both have the A license.I hold a South African coaching license and so, I will need to write to the FA and attach my certification from South Africa. I want them to give me a year to get the CAF License A.”Recently, the Ghana FA published a list of coaches with the A License the country and Painstil’s name was not on that list. The list covered those who had gone through the CAF License course between 2012 and 2016.last_img read more