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UVM among NASA education research program award recipients

first_imgNASA has awarded approximately $19 million to colleges and universities nationwide to conduct research and technology development in areas of importance to NASA’s mission. The University of Vermont was among six schools to be selected for two proposals. In addition, the awards enable faculty development and higher education student support.The selections are part of NASA’s Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research, known as EPSCoR. The program is designed to assist states in establishing an academic research enterprise directed toward a long-term, self-sustaining and competitive capability that will contribute to its economic viability and development. The program helps develop partnerships between NASA research assets, academic institutions and industry. The selected proposals support all four of NASA’s mission directorates: aeronautics, exploration systems, science and space operations.A total of 27 proposals were selected from organizations in Alabama, Arkansas, Hawaii, Idaho, Iowa, Kansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Montana, Nebraska, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Puerto Rico, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Utah, Vermont and West Virginia.Two proposals were selected from each of the following colleges and universities:New Mexico State UniversitySouth Dakota School of Mines & TechnologyUniversity of Alabama In HuntsvilleUniversity of Nebraska at OmahaUniversity of Puerto RicoUniversity of Vermont & State Agricultural CollegeWichita State University, KansasOne proposal was selected from each of the following organizations:College of Charleston, South CarolinaLouisiana Board of Regents FoundationMontana State UniversityUniversity of Arkansas at Little RockUniversity of Hawaii SystemsUniversity of IdahoUniversity of MississippiUniversity of North DakotaUniversity of Northern IowaUniversity of OklahomaUniversity of UtahVanderbilt UniversityWest Virginia UniversityProposals were chosen through a merit-based, peer-reviewed competition. The maximum award is $750,000 for a 3-year period. A one-to-one match of funds is required for every NASA dollar awarded.This program and the agency’s other education programs support NASA’s commitment to excellence in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, which will play a key role in preparing, inspiring, encouraging and nurturing the nation’s future workforce.For a list of project descriptions, click on “Selected Proposals” and look for “Competitive Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR)” or solicitation NNH09ZNE002C at:http://nspires.nasaprs.com(link is external)For additional information about NASA’s EPSCoR program, visit:http://www.nasa.gov/education/epscor(link is external)For information about NASA’s Education programs, visit:http://www.nasa.gov(link is external)last_img read more

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CUNA calls for increased CDP funding for CUs in developing countries

first_img This post is currently collecting data… This is placeholder text continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrcenter_img CUNA wrote to Congressional leadership Tuesday in support of increased funding for the Cooperative Development Program (CDP), and specifically for community-based credit unions in developing countries. The CDP is a global initiative administered by the U.S. Agency for International Development that focuses on building capacity of cooperative businesses and cooperative systems.The program was funded at $17 million in FY20, and that amount is raised to $20 million in Senate Appropriations Committee legislation.“During discussions with the Senate regarding omnibus spending legislation, we respectfully urge you to adopt this increased Senate funding level for the Cooperative Development Program,” CUNA’s letter reads. “In addition, we urge you to accept the corresponding report language that funds enacted in FY 2021 for the CDP that are in excess of the FY 2020 level be directed to ‘community-based credit unions in developing countries.’”last_img read more

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Fugro Starts French Offshore Wind Survey Campaign

first_imgFugro has started a geotechnical survey campaign on the 480MW Saint-Nazaire offshore wind farm in France.During the first geotechnical campaign, completed in 2015, soil conditions on half of the positions of the wind turbine foundations were surveyed and sampled.Fugro will now survey the remaining half of the foundation positions.The survey campaign is expected to be carried out from May to July, weather permitting. The jack-up platform Excalibur is already on site where it will be joined by the Fugro Scout at the end of May.The Saint-Nazaire wind farm is situated 12km offshore the Loire-Atlantique and covers an area of 78 square kilometres. It will comprise 80 6MW GE Haliade 150 turbines which will be built locally in Saint Nazaire. The wind farm is slated for commissioning in 2021.The owners and developers of the project are EDF Energies Nouvelles, a subsidiary of the EDF group, and Canada’s Enbridge Inc.last_img read more

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Men’s basketball off to lackluster start

first_imgIt’s hard to believe there was a part of the season when the USC men’s basketball team held a No. 10 rank.Andy Enfield expects a better performance from his players during his fifth season as the head coach of the USC men’s basketball team. Photo by Will Alpert | Daily TrojanSince the start of the season, the team has fallen to 11-6, taking losses to ranked and unranked opponents and is on its way out of the top 25. To be fair, it’s been a wild season of NCAA basketball so far, with teams like Kansas and Kentucky tumbling into double-digit rankings after dropping major losses both at home and on the road. Last week alone, three of the top five teams fell to unranked opponents, completely shifting the rankings yet again. While it might be a topsy turvy season for the country as a whole, the Trojans have themselves to blame for their sudden and furious descent out of the national rankings. The team entered the season with a full return of a talented crop of starters bolstered by several fresh faces. Before the first tip-off of the season, it appeared that the Trojans’ NCAA run of last season might continue and expand this year. Months later, even head coach Andy Enfield, who is known for standing by his players, seems at a loss.“I usually take the blame for losses, and obviously every game goes on my record as a head coach,” Enfield said after an 81-88 loss to Washington. “But tonight, I was very disappointed in some of our upperclassmen, defensively. You can blame me for not motivating them or getting them to play up to their capability. They have to go home and look in the mirror and come back and play better basketball if we’re going to have a chance to win games in this league.”The easiest way to analyze any team’s failures is to study its losses. Most often, the Trojans struggle when they dig themselves into a hole by allowing their opponents to build up a lead, often failing to reclaim it. In four of its six losses this season, USC entered the half with a deficit, launching a valiant comeback attempt only to fall slightly short. Win or lose, the Trojans typically score less frequently in the first half than in the second, a habit that isn’t uncommon for any team, given that defense is best played with fresh legs. However, the team’s underperformance in the first half has been a consistent issue. Even in victories over teams such as New Mexico State, USC often enters the second half with a tie or a razor-thin lead.Part of this deficit can be attributed to shooting. The Trojans are currently shooting below 50 percent from the field, but they have especially struggled against ranked opponents, highlighted by a dismal 28 percent performance against Texas A&M. Despite averaging 14 trips to the line per game, the Trojans have struggled similarly with free throws, failing to deliver in close-game situations. The team missed 10 of its 21 free throws in a loss against Cal. At first, they weren’t necessarily bad losses. Dropping to now-No. 11 Texas A&M is not necessarily worth mourning, and falling to wonderkid Trae Young and now-No. 7 Oklahoma is a similarly manageable loss. But the meltdown against Princeton, which resulted in a 10-point overtime loss at home to an unranked Ivy League team, followed by a home loss to Washington burst the bubble that USC belonged at the top of the NCAA. This weekend’s heartbreaker against Stanford reflected the truth — the Trojans just don’t have it this season. “We should’ve taken care of business,” senior guard Jordan McLaughlin said after the team blew a 15-point deficit to lose to Stanford. The captain repeatedly described the loss as “tough,” emphasizing how difficult it was to lose on a buzzer-beater shot. Yet he didn’t seem to have an answer for why the Trojans still haven’t learned to hang onto a lead.The main issue with this team lies in the fact that even though the Trojans are winning games, they aren’t winning by enough to convince anyone of their dominance. Four of the team’s 11 victories have ended with single-digit leads. Winning by 5-point margins over teams such as Middle Tennessee and New Mexico State simply won’t cut it. Although the Pac-12 isn’t the power conference it hoped to be at the start of the season, boasting only two top-25 teams, it will still provide consistent competition for the Trojans as they attempt to rebuild and salvage this could-have-been season. With a 2-2 record, the team sits in the dead center of the conference rankings. However, no Pac-12 team is undefeated in conference play even this early in the season, and no team in this conference is unbeatable in any way.Perhaps the brightest light of this season so far has been McLaughlin, who averages 12.9 points and 7.8 assists per game. Although McLaughlin isn’t the team’s leader in points or steals, he remains the heartbeat of the Trojans on both offense and defense, and in big-game situations, he’s the leader that the team desperately needs. Whether it’s notching 19 assists against UC Santa Barbara or putting up the would-be game-winner against Stanford, McLaughlin has proven his worth as the senior captain of the squad. And this is his team to turn around as the Trojans continue into conference play.Their Final Four dreams might be distant, but for now, a conference title is a promising and achievable goal for the Trojans.last_img read more