Posted on Leave a comment

QPR heading for training camp

first_img Only goal difference keeps Rangers out of the bottom three following their 2-1 defeat at Hull, but they must wait until a March 4 clash with Arsenal to get things back on track. A scheduled meeting with Tottenham at the weekend has been postponed due to Spurs’ Capital One Cup final appearance, leaving Ramsey with a window to get his side together in a new environment. And with adverse weather making life hard at the club’s Imperial College training ground, it has been an easy decision. The squad have travelled to Dubai, where they will stay for five days, with Ramsey having invited three development players along. Darnell Furlong, who made his debut against Hull and was involved in the incident that led to captain Joey Barton’s sending off, makes the trip alongside Cole Kpekawa and Reece Grego-Cox. “We believe that getting together, going through and planning what we want to do for these last 12 games is going to be very important,” said Ramsey. “The grounds are not very good here at the moment and our training pitch gets flooded despite the efforts of the groundsmen, who have done very well for us this season. “We think that if we can get away for a bit of different scenery and look at things in a more holistic manner, it will be better for us. “We’ll try to cram in more quality training in a more relaxed situation.” Press Associationcenter_img Head coach Chris Ramsey has taken advantage of a break in QPR’s fixture list to take his struggling squad to Dubai for a training camp.last_img read more

Posted on Leave a comment

USC to compete in Kap7 SoCal Invitational

first_imgMen’s water polo will head to the coast this weekend as they compete in the SoCal tournament in Malibu, an annual tournament in which the Trojans have been wildly successful in the past.The team is looking to capture their fourth straight title, as well as their 12th championship in the past 13 years. The annual Kap7 SoCal Invitational is the counterpart to the NorCal tournament the Trojans played in earlier this  season.“It’s a little bit different because the NorCal tournament is the first big tournament we’re in,” sophomore driver Grant Stein said. “Now that we’ve played a couple of those top teams, we know what to expect coming into SoCal this weekend.”The Trojans have already had plenty of competition to get their season heated up, both in the NorCal tournament and at home this past weekend.USC avenged a NorCal loss to Stanford in a high-stakes overtime 12-8 victory over the visiting Cardinal. The Trojans have had to keep their focus this week to avoid getting caught up in what was the win of the season for the team so far.“There’s no relaxation after that win,” Stein said. “It was a good win, but there’s no relaxation going into SoCal.”The 16-team field of the SoCal tournament includes all 10 MPSF teams. The teams will be battling not only for their chance at a title, but also for their national rankings. Thirteen of the 16 teams are ranked in the top 20 in the country.USC will open their tournament bid against San Jose State on Saturday morning before playing either No. 6 UC Santa Barbara or No. 15 UC San Diego in their final matchup of pool play. The rest of the tournament will be bracketed based on Saturday’s results. The Trojans will need to pull out two wins on Saturday to land in a Sunday semifinal.USC started the season ranked No. 2 in the country and dropped a single spot after their NorCal tournament loss to Stanford.  Following their big weekend however, the Trojans have regained the second spot in the country behind crosstown rival UCLA.  The Bruins took home the NorCal championship, beating Stanford 8-7 in the title game.The Trojans aren’t worried about who they will be playing, though. The team acknowledges the fact that even though they will be up against top competition in the country, they are focused on avenging their loss to UCLA in the NCAA championship game last season.“We keep focusing on the main goal: winning a national championship. As long as we can keep that thought in our heads we’ll be able to focus and win more games,” Stein said.The Trojans are resting comfortably on the shoulders of very equal scoring. The team has the top offense in the MPSF with just over 19 goals per game. Junior Blake Edwards leads the team in goals with 35 just 13 games into the season. Sophomore Matteo Morelli is second in scoring with 22 goals, and just behind him are sophomores Lachlan Edwards and Grant Stein with 20 goals apiece.To complement their high scoring offense, the Trojans are also boasting the second best defense in the MPSF, allowing just over five goals per game.last_img read more

Posted on Leave a comment

Jung Money: A sign of hope for the 2018 Olympics

first_imgOllie Jung | Daily TrojanIt’s probably safe to say most fans love sports for their drama above all else — the fleeting minutes after a miraculous comeback or championship-winning score that transcend some of life’s most memorable moments. But sometimes, our affinity for those instants makes us conjure up narratives that aren’t there.I felt myself doing this on Wednesday, when news broke that North and South Korea had struck a deal for a gesture of unity at the Winter Olympics in February. There was doubt last year whether the hermit nation would even attend the Games (North Korea boycotted the 1988 Summer Olympics in Seoul, the South’s capital, and doesn’t have a strong attendance record at the winter edition). Now, the North and South will march together under a single flag during the opening ceremony and field a joint women’s hockey team.It’ll be a strange experience for many here in the United States to watch a pair of countries technically still at war standing under one flag, but back where I was born, it represents what people want to see. Most South Koreans dream of reunification (there’s an entire government agency devoted to it): It’s just a matter of whether they trust their northern neighbors enough to even entertain the prospect of cooperation. There’s an inherent feeling on the peninsula that the two countries are one nation, but it’s hard to forget times like 1987, when the North bombed a southern passenger jet leading up to Seoul’s opening ceremony.Still, when an announcement like Wednesday’s comes around, the sentimental sports fan in me can’t help but think of the perfect, stranger-than-fiction setup for another classic story. What if the unified Korean team makes a Cinderella run to a medal? It would be a completely different — and perhaps even more incredible — Miracle on Ice. What if the decades of animosity and conflict finally started coming to an end in Pyeongchang?But I’ve already lived through this moment. Sixteen years ago, my family settled into the seats of the Seoul World Cup Stadium to watch an exhibition between the North and South. It was the two teams’ first meeting on the pitch in more than a decade. Soccer’s popularity had exploded in East Asia thanks to South Korea and Japan’s joint hosting of the 2002 World Cup, where the former upset the likes of Spain and Italy in a magical run to the third-place match. Sixty-thousand fans were in a frenzy, chanting “unification” and “peace in Korea.” The game was a boring, scoreless draw, but after the final whistle, the competitors embraced. Cameras focused in on a South Korean player stripping off his uniform to reveal underneath: “SOUTH KOREA LOVES NORTH KOREA.” The North would send more than 300 athletes south to the port city of Busan later that month for the 2002 Asian Games. North Korean leader Kim-Jong un was still in college; President Donald Trump was merely a loud-mouthed real estate mogul. The end of the conflict seemed just around the corner.South and North Korea have faced each other more than 20 times on the soccer field since that night. The North has also continued its aggressive nuclear program, and the two nations even fired artillery at each other in 2010. I have always cherished the healing capacity of sports — the Red Sox helping Boston recover from the Boston Marathon bombings with a World Series title in 2013, the Astros doing the same for Houston after Hurricane Harvey last year — but this old wound is too deep to be ameliorated by any ballgame.So, despite a glimmer of hope, South Koreans will soon return to a reality of uncertainty on the peninsula. For three weeks, however, there will be a team the entire nation can get behind. It’s even more significant in an Olympics that has failed to drum up much local or global interest, and if it can make it out of group play, the joint women’s hockey squad could command the spotlight in Pyeongchang, which will be without NHL stars or a true American-Russian rivalry.Speaking of Americans, it’s tough to predict how this Korean embrace will be received stateside. It would be easy to root against the athletes, considering North Korea’s threat to the United States. But the competitors under the unified flag don’t reflect their governments. Despite generations of conflict, a group of women will take the ice next month as a Korea on the world stage after war destroyed a country and countless families nearly 70 years ago. The team may not win a medal, but maybe its simple existence is enough of a miracle to bring some unity — however temporary — to today’s fractured world.Ollie Jung is a senior majoring in print and digital journalism. His column, “Jung Money,” runs Fridays.last_img read more

Posted on Leave a comment

Wilbur Arthur ‘Jess’ Jesseph, 76, Conway Springs: Oct. 18, 1938 – March 28, 2015

first_imgWilbur JessephWilbur Arthur “Jess” Jesseph of Conway Springs,  died Saturday, March 28, 2015 at AMG Hospital in Wichita at the age of 76.Jess was born the son of William and Alma May (Kimberlin) Jesseph on October 18, 1938 in Argonia.Jess was a truck driver for 50 years before retiring.Survivors, include son, Jimmy Jesseph and wife Carla of La Vernia, Texas, son, Michael Jesseph of El Dorado,  daughter, Julie Gentry of Harrah, Oklahoma, son, Jeffrey Jesseph and wife Tena of Hollis Oklahoma, son, Allan Rasco of Garland, Texas, daughter, Anita Eichelberger and husband Doug of Hydro, Oklahoma, son, Gary Rasco and wife Beth of Garland, Texas, 12 grandchildren and 9 great-grandchildren and sister Shirley Stansbury and husband Ralph of Argonia. He was preceded in death by his parents, brother, Charles Jesseph and sister, Eileen Kibbie.Visitation will be at Day Funeral Home from 1 p.m. to 8 p.m., Tuesday, March 31, 2015 with the family present from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.Funeral services for Jess will be held at 1 p.m., Wednesday, April 1, 2015 at the Floyd Memorial Chapel in the Argonia Cemetery, Argonia.To share a memory or leave condolences, please visit www.dayfuneralhome.info.Arrangements are by Day Funeral Home & Crematory, Wellington.last_img read more