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Champlain College students work for state trade partnership

first_imgBURLINGTON, Vt.–Champlain College students Heather Littlefield, Anna Wisniewska, Alina Stanciu and Emily Howland have been working atthe Vermont Global Trade Partnership (VGTP) during the spring 2007 semester. These Champlain College students earned their internships through a competitive interview process.Vermont business people access a broad range of trade services through the VGTP, a state program which has established an office in the S.D. Ireland Family Center for Global Business and Technology on the Champlain College campus. Champlain offers the only International Business program in the state of Vermont.Businesses can receive assistance with: reviewing trade regulations, tariffs and logistics, researching new markets, importing and exporting, product sourcing, trade missions, overseas trade shows, and networking opportunities.Additionally, student Emily Howland is doing a four-month internship in Shanghai, China. She is an intern at the Shanghai Small Enterprise Trade Development Center, promoting international business relationships. Howland is no stranger to China, having studied for four years in Beijing. She is a fluent speaker of the Chinese dialect of Mandarin. Howland is sharing her experience in China via a student blog.Prior to this spring internship, she has been continuing her role as lead research assistant for the Vermont Global Trade Partnership. In November, she accompanied a Vermont delegation on a trade mission to China and assisted as an interpreter. More recently, she organized Vermont’s participation in the American Education Fairs in Taiwan. She also hosted a tourism representative from China and toured her around Vermont.”I’m looking forward to getting experience in working in a Chinese office,” she said. “It’s a similar organization to where I work now — I’ll just see things from the other side.” Howland grew up in Richmond, Vt. and is a graduate of Mt. Mansfield Union High School.Littlefield, from Morrisville, Vt., is a graduate of People’s Academy. She is finishing her bachelor’s degree in International Business and she brings retail experience to the VGTP, including shipping and receiving responsibilities for textiles. With the VGTP, she performs research in areas that include sourcing and distributor searches, as well as regulatory market reports.Wisniewska is a native of Poland. She is a Business and Management major who also brings human resources and accounting knowledge to the internship.Stanciu is from Romania and she is an International Business student. Stanciu is helping the VGTP investigate new business opportunities in Romania and Bulgaria — which are new members of the European Union.last_img read more

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N.Korean women faced torture, rape, malnourishment in detention, says UN report

first_img“I did not sleep and worked because I did not want to be beaten. It was excruciating to a level that I even attempted to commit suicide,” one woman was quoted as saying.North Korea did not immediately react to the report but it has previously called criticism over its human rights record a “plot to overthrow” its regime.Another woman recalled one of her first nights in detention in 2010 when she was raped by an officer.”He threatened that … I would be humiliated if I rejected him. He even told me he could help me to be released sooner if I did as he said,” she said.Gathering information in isolated North Korea is notoriously difficult, and the report acknowledged the lack of access to the country limited the agency’s ability to verify the interviewees’ accounts.Daniel Collinge, a UN human rights officer who co-authored the report, said the project was aimed at putting pressure on Pyongyang to improve the situation, while urging other countries not to deport defectors who risk their lives to achieve freedom and prosperity.South Korea’s Moon Jae-in government, which is trying to improve ties with the North, recently came under criticism after revoking the licenses of defector groups and banning their campaigns to send anti-Pyongyang propaganda leaflets across the border. Topics : North Korean women detained in prison camps suffered from torture, rape and other forms of “multiple and serious” violence by security and police officials, a UN human rights report said on Tuesday, citing accounts from over 100 women.The women, detained between 2009 and 2019 after failing to flee the country, recounted in interviews with UN investigators in Seoul after their release, how they were deprived of food, sleep, daylight and fresh air while in the detention centers and prison camps.Many also said in the report titled “I Still Feel The Pain” that they were subjected to torture, invasive body searches, forced abortions and even rape by authorities there. All of the women eventually managed to defect to South Korea.last_img read more