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Syracuse’s next opponent: What to know about St. Bonaventure

first_img Published on December 27, 2018 at 5:41 pm Contact Billy: wmheyen@syr.edu | @Wheyen3 Facebook Twitter Google+ Syracuse (8-4) closes out its nonconference schedule against another in-state foe, St. Bonaventure (4-8). The Bonnies defeated the Orange in the Carrier Dome a year ago, but St. Bonaventure is a much different team than it was when it upset SU. Syracuse enters off a win over Arkansas State, while SBU has lost three in-a-row.Here’s what to know before the 2 p.m. tip off on Saturday.All-time series: Syracuse leads, 24-4Last time they played: On Dec. 22, 2017, Syracuse and St. Bonaventure played a low-scoring game into an overtime period. The Bonnies won, 60-57, in a game that hinged on a late Oshae Brissett charge call. The Orange had their usual three in double figures that day: Frank Howard, Brissett and Tyus Battle. The Bonnies were led by Jaylen Adams’ 23 points. Adams left the Bonnies last year for the NBA.The St. Bonaventure report: The Bonnies are led by 6-foot-5 senior forward, Courtney Stockard. He leads SBU in scoring, at 19.0 points per game, and with 6.5 rebounds per game. After missing the first six games of the season with an injury, Stockard’s return has made him a focal point of the Bonnies’ attack. Guards Jalen Poyser and Kyle Lofton also average double-digits and shoot well from beyond the arc. Off the bench, Nelson Kaputo will also play sizable minutes and space the floor, as he’s hit 20 3s this season.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textIn addition to Lofton, the Bonnies’ freshman class is led by the play of 6-foot-10 Osun Osunniyi. He leads SBU with 31 blocks, almost three per game. Osunniyi splits time with another 6-foot-10 player, Amadi Ikpeze, but Ikpeze doesn’t pose as a shot-blocking threat like Osunniyi. The Bonnies shoot the 3 at 35.7 percent, above the national average per Kenpom.com, but shoot below 50 percent from 2-point range. They have a top-100 defense in the country, and four players have double-digit steals this season. Also, the Bonnies rank 79th in the nation in free-throw percentage, at 73.1 percent, which could be important if the two play another slow-it-down contest.How Syracuse beats St. Bonaventure: Finish at the rim. It won’t necessarily be an easy task, as Osunniyi is one of the nation’s top shot blockers. Even with him on the bench, Ikpeze provides another stout presence inside. And the Orange don’t always show perfection at the rim, with Brissett often failing to finish on strong drives and Paschal Chukwu and Bourama Sidibe shaky near the basket. But as SU eventually showed against Arkansas State, it has players that can break down average man-to-man defenders, which leads to looks inside. To win, the Orange will simply have to finish.In addition, the Bonnies will look to remain in the game with perimeter shooting against SU’s 2-3 zone, and the Orange will have to stop players from getting hot. Multiple mid-major guards — Cornell’s Matt Morgan, Morehead State’s Jordan Walker and Buffalo’s CJ Massinburg — kept their teams close against SU with strong 3-point shooting. Syracuse will have to be sure that Stockard, Poyser and Kaputo, among others, are held in check from deep.Stat to know: 15.1 percent – Osun Osunniyi’s block percentage, per Kenpom.com, the ratio of field-goal attempts while he’s on the floor that he blocksKenPom odds: Syracuse is given an 88 percent chance to win, by a 69-56 scorePlayer to watch: Courtney Stockard, forward, No. 11Stockard missed two full seasons with foot injuries after transferring to St. Bonaventure from a junior college. He scored 26 points in SBU’s NCAA Tournament win over UCLA last spring. The junior even helps run a non-profit organization, TruVision, with some friends from the St. Louis area. On Saturday against Syracuse, he’ll add a prolific inside-outside game that’s seen him hit multiple 3s in each of SBU’s last three games while grabbing at least six rebounds in each, as well. A year ago, he scored seven points with six rebounds and five assists in the Bonnies’ upset win. This year, he’ll be the go-to option. Commentslast_img read more

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Sunday editorial: What is wrong with my state?

first_imgCommentary by Andy Speagle, Vice Chairman, Sumner County Democratic Party — What is wrong with my state?Like many of you, I’m a born, raised and educated citizen of Kansas.  I grew up in a small town and was always amazed at the beauty of this state and the friendliness and caring that I saw from my fellow Kansans.  I served for nearly a decade in the U.S. Army, and upon my departure from that institution I looked forward to returning home to my native land.  Sadly, as the years have drawn on, I’ve become somewhat less enamored with my home state.Andy SpeagleThe current failed government experiment, led by Governor Brownback and his cronies in Topeka, threatens to destroy our state.  As we stare down the barrel of another almost $300 million revenue shortfall, we are left looking forward to another raiding of our highway funds, primary, secondary and higher education budgets, retirement funds and other key social programs.  The government’s continued refusal to expand Medicaid via the Affordable Care Act leaves many of our seniors paying much higher medical care costs than necessary.  Why?  How could this happen to the state I call home?  How did we allow this to happen?It’s clear that our governor and state legislators have forgotten that their jobs are to serve the people; not themselves, not special interests and not their big business buddies.  What’s ultimately sadder is that we seem to be continuing to allow this.  When did we forget that the folks in Topeka don’t rule us, aren’t our lords and masters and are elected merely to represent and serve our best interests?  Does anyone truly believe it’s in our best interests for our schools to go unfunded, for our highways to fall into disrepair, for our citizens to be denied access to affordable health care options?This keeps happening because we, the people of this state, continue to surrender our sovereignty by electing and reelecting these so-called “representatives of the people” into office.  We blindly vote along party lines, not really understanding what harm those actions will bring to ourselves and our neighbors.  We seem to be so locked into these old ways of thinking that we can’t see the cliff coming until we’re already falling.How many more years of these disastrous state fiscal policies must we endure before we come to our senses and remember that this is OUR democracy?  How much more damage to our state will we allow before we grab the wheel back from these elected officials and avoid going over the cliff?  How many of you aren’t registered to vote, or are, but don’t vote and yet see what’s going on in the state and feel powerless to fix it?You’re not powerless.  Your vote is your power.  If you’re not registered to vote, fix it, get registered.  If you don’t vote, fix it, show up to vote in the upcoming primaries on August 2 and the general election on November 8.  If you don’t vote, you’re surrendering your power, your sovereignty to the elected officials in Topeka who clearly don’t care about you.  You’re telling them to do whatever they want with Kansas, because you just don’t care anymore.I hope, as a fellow Kansan who cares for his or her state, you’ll stand with me this year to cast your vote for a different state legislature.  The Sumner County Democratic Party meets the first Thursday of each month at the Wellington Library at 7 p.m.  Please come join us to learn more about how you can become involved with helping to take back Kansas from the abuses of the current legislature that continues to serve the disastrous Brownback policies.Please use the following contact information to get in touch with the Sumner County Democratic Party for more information:Danette Harris, Chair – danette.harris@yahoo.comAndy Speagle, Vice-Chair – andy.speagle@gmail.comCristel Heffron, Treasurer – sunchild327@gmail.comFollow us on Twitter. Close Forgot password? Please put in your email: Send me my password! Close message Login This blog post All blog posts Subscribe to this blog post’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Subscribe to this blog’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Follow the discussion Comments (55) Logging you in… Close Login to IntenseDebate Or create an account Username or Email: Password: Forgot login? Cancel Login Close WordPress.com Username or Email: Password: Lost your password? Cancel Login Dashboard | Edit profile | Logout Logged in as Admin Options Disable comments for this page Save Settings Sort by: Date Rating Last Activity Loading comments… You are about to flag this comment as being inappropriate. Please explain why you are flagging this comment in the text box below and submit your report. The blog admin will be notified. Thank you for your input. -20 Vote up Vote down Ted “Theodore” Logan · 221 weeks ago “We blindly vote along party lines” You answered your questioned with a single phrase. Oddly, the republican party has never represented what is best for Kansas. It won’t make you a hippie if you vote Democrat, you won’t go to hell, you won’t lose your guns. Report Reply 4 replies · active 221 weeks ago +15 Vote up Vote down D. Floyd · 221 weeks ago Why should Kansan’s trade one proven political platform for another federally proven political train wreck? Report Reply 4 replies · active 221 weeks ago +21 Vote up Vote down Jim · 221 weeks ago Mr. Spreagle, Thank you for your service in the military and thank for having the courage to participate in the political system. I am sure that you understand the other point of view that government should be limited and that the ultimate provider of income for government is not business, it is the worker. Some workers provide more services than other workers and they temporarily have more income than others and you would call them rich. By taking money from the rich and giving it to the non workers is the answer of socialism or progressivism as you call it now. If the State of Kansas had a surplus, it would be spent somewhere. If the State of Kansas broke even, someone would complain. If the State of Kansas had a 2% deficient, someone would complain. HIGHLIGHTS •Between fiscal years 2014 and 2015, total government spending in Kansas increased by approximately $686 million, from $14.4 billion in fiscal year 2014 to an estimated $15.0 billion in 2015. This represents a 4.56 percent increase.[1][2][3] •In Kansas in fiscal year 2014, 53.0 percent of total tax revenues came from sales taxes and gross receipts. Income taxes accounted for 38.7 percent of total tax collections. •Education accounted for 43.5 percent of state expenditures in fiscal year 2015, while 22.4 percent went to Medicaid. References 1.↑ Bureau of Labor Statistics, “CPI Detailed Report Data for February 2015,” accessed April 4, 2016 2.↑ 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 National Association of State Budget Officers, “Examining fiscal 2013-2015 state spending,” accessed April 4, 2016 3.↑ InflationData.com, “Cumulative Inflation Calculator,” accessed April 4, 2016. The cumulative rate of inflation Report Reply 12 replies · active 221 weeks ago +19 Vote up Vote down I.B. Well · 221 weeks ago A democrat whining about our Republican governor. Wow, what a surprise! It’s amazing how someone who served in our Armed Forces could support a “president” who has done everything possible to show his contempt for our military and our country. Report Reply 3 replies · active 221 weeks ago +29 Vote up Vote down John · 221 weeks ago I served in the infantry of both Marines and Army. This alone does not qualify me to serve as a competent representative of the Republic. Article 4 section 4 of the Constitution states. The United States shall guarantee to every State in the Union a Republican form of Government, and shall protect each of them from invasion……. So original intent is always essential in learning or relearning the truths of what our country is supposed to be. Report Reply 0 replies · active 221 weeks ago +13 Vote up Vote down JustMe · 221 weeks ago Stop voting party lines says the vice-chair of the Sumner County DEMOCRATIC Party. lol “How many more years of these disastrous state fiscal policies must we endure before we come to our senses and remember that this is OUR democracy?” That sentence alone tells me how much credence I should put into this editorial from someone with standing in a governmental party organization. Report Reply 4 replies · active 221 weeks ago -25 Vote up Vote down Eric Pierce · 221 weeks ago Why do we even have parties anymore. More time is spent arguing over whos party is right or wrong rather than what the actual problem is. I am sick and tired of whiny little entitled clowns. Tax each one of the 330,000 LLC’s who currently pay NO income tax $1,000.00 a year to operate in the state of Kansas. Oh we would have a surplus all of a sudden in tax dollars? What do you know problem solved by a 27 year old when 100 and some ELECTED officials are busy raping every fund our state needs to stay afloat. It is not rocket science guys. It is common sense. Report Reply 5 replies · active 221 weeks ago -21 Vote up Vote down Eric Pierce · 221 weeks ago Oh come on. If you can’t afford to pay $1,000 a year to help your state fund all their important programs when you aren’t currently paying anything you probably shouldn’t be in business in the first place. Almost every state in the US has income tax on businesses. Why do I have to pay taxes on my income but they don’t? In fact I am taxed when I earn money and taxed when I spend money. Hell some of these businesses are even tax exempt so they don’t have to pay sales tax either when they buy things. Its time everyone pay their fair share and not punish our kids young and old for a bunch of idiots in Topeka who can’t tie their shoes let alone control our finances. When they go into “overtime” sessions to balance a budget they should lose money from their salaries not pay them overtime. The way things work are not good for the people. Everyone needs to go and we need a fresh start. Report Reply 5 replies · active 221 weeks ago -10 Vote up Vote down {2} · 221 weeks ago In all honesty you should start a petition to oust Brownback and is cronies. Next, hold an election to vote in who you deem fit to do the job. After that you will have yourselves to blame just like you have yourselves to blame for putting up with the crap. Report Reply 0 replies · active 221 weeks ago -6 Vote up Vote down Thirsty · 221 weeks ago There is a number of petitions already. This one on this link has over 40,000 signatures. http://petitions.moveon.org/sign/recall-sam-brown… Report Reply 0 replies · active 221 weeks ago 12Next » Post a new comment Enter text right here! Comment as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Comments by IntenseDebate Enter text right here! Reply as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. 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‘I Would Have Voted against It’

first_imgVP Jewel Howard Taylor: “My parents came from nowhere but they understand the importance of giving anyone a sound education…”Bong County Senior Senator Jewel Howard-Taylor has stated that had she been present, she would have voted against the amendment to the Central Bank of Liberia (CBL) Act, which was recently passed with unanimous consent by the Senate.Senator Taylor, a trained banker and Chair of the Senate Committee on Autonomous Commissions and Agencies, was speaking in Monrovia last week in the wake of mixed public reactions to the passage of the controversial amendment to the CBL Act by both Houses of the Legislature.“I was not here when that law was passed. I was in Accra, (Ghana) representing the Senate at a meeting there; but if I [had been here], I would have voted against it,” Senator Taylor declared.The Bong County lawmaker stated that there was a need for the Legislature to craft a holistic law that would apply to all officials serving at a particular level in government, instead of one that targets a particular entity and its officials.“You now have a group of governors — not just Mills Jones — every governor at CBL is now barred from taking part in the 2014 elections. I am not even talking about 2017. I was hoping that we would do that in the Code of Conduct that would set a certain level across the board… [without discrimination],” Senator Taylor lamented.“There must be a holistic law that looks at everyone at a particular level, instead of one law that seems to be targeting the Central Bank of Liberia and all of its officials. I made a comment the other day without knowing that they would have this problem,” the outspoken female lawmaker declared.“If there are issues of mismanagement or misusing money, there are opportunities to deal with that as an issue; but to go and put in place a law?”The Senate passed the bill unanimously before sending it to the House of Representatives, which concurred with zero tolerance for dissent. The speed with which the bill was passed earned it the nickname ‘4G bill’.Having voiced her disagreement with the recently passed bill, Senator Taylor opined that the matter must now be taken from where it is.“There are people who have already taken the issue to court (Supreme Court). Maybe they can use the opportunity to go back,” she suggested.In a related development, the former First Lady of Liberia has praised her colleagues in the Liberian Senate for the recent passage of the portion of the Electoral Reform Laws which stipulates that:  “In submitting to the National Elections Commission a list of its candidates for elective office, a political party or coalition should endeavor to ensure that the governing body and its list of candidates has no less than 30% of its members from each gender.”She said the development could not have come at a better time than on the eve of the week when the world is celebrating International Women’s Day. She particularly thanked her sister, Madam Sandra Howard, whom she recalled was among the crafters of the law that created the Gender and Development Ministry during the regime of her ex-husband, former President Charles Taylor.With the coming to power of Liberia’s and Africa’s first democratically-elected female President, Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf, Senator Taylor said the glass ceiling has been broken and marks the beginning of how far Liberian women can go.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more