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Companies in VOSHA’s Green Mountain Voluntary Protection Programs perform better than national average

first_imgCompanies enrolled in the VOSHA Green Mountain Voluntary Protection Programs (GMVPP) have, once again, performed at a higher level than the national average of their peers in the area of reportable jobsite injuries and illnesses, as reported by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), Incidence rates of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses by industry and case types, 2008.In the latest 2008 BLS report, two important performance measures are tracked and compared to the North American Industrial Classification Code System (NAICS) for each industry type. The first is the industry Total Case Incident Rate (TCIR). This rate is a reflection of the worksite s total recordable cases in a calendar year. The second is the Days Away Restricted and/or Transferred rate (DART). This rate reflects the number of recordable cases in a calendar year that result in an employee missing time from work or having to perform duties which are not their normal jobsite duties due to the injury or illness. These rates are reflected in a percentage per 1000 employees in a particular NAICS industry type.For the 2009 calendar year all of the employers recognized by the GMVPP have outperformed the latest injury and illness statistics. The following are the performance numbers listed as a percentage below the related BLS average for their respective industries.Ben and Jerry s Homemade, Saint Albans Manufacturing FacilityTCIR 64% DART 52%United Water NACO, Saint Johnsbury Waste Water Treatment FacilityTCIR 100%, No recordable cases DART 100%, No recordable casesEnergizer Battery, Bennington Manufacturing FacilityTCIR 61% DART 88%Energizer Battery, Saint Albans Manufacturing FacilityTCIR 30% DART 16%G.E. Aviation, Rutland ManufacturingTCIR 31% DART 42%IBM, Essex JunctionTCIR 31% DART 17%Entergy Nuclear Vermont Yankee, VernonTCIR 60% DART 100%, No recordable casesVermont Agency of Transportation, District 7, Saint JohnsburyTCIR 58% DART 100%, No recordable casesThe GMVPP is a VOSHA partnership program that recognizes worksites with exemplary safety and health management systems in place. Those systems are based on four core values: 1) Management Commitment and Employee Involvement; 2) Worksite Hazard Assessment; 3) Hazard Prevention and Control; and 4) Employee Safety and Health Training.last_img read more

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Gayle A. Schaefer

first_imgMemorial contributions can be directed to St. Jacob’s Cemetery, the Sunman Life Squad or to the Sunman Volunteer Fire Department.  To sign the online guestbook please visit www.cookrosenberger.com.  The staff of Cook Rosenberger is honored to serve the family of Gayle Schaefer. Those surviving who will cherish Gayle’s memory include her children, Kristy (John) Miller of Brookville, Lisa (Ken) Mosmeier of Sunman, Kim (David) Craig of Lawrenceburg, Shari (Jeff) Sterwerf of Sunman, and Kelley (Randy) Fuernstein of Brookville; grandchildren, Jonathan Mosmeier, Joshua Craig, Brittany Craig, Aaron Sterwerf, Kaitlin Sterwerf, and Colton Fuernstein; siblings, Eileen Gunter of Batesville, Lester (Audrey) Hornberger of Sunman, Virginia Richter of Sunman, Paul Jr. (Debbie) Hornberger of Brookville, Wanda (Harold) Vogt of Batesville, and one sister-in-law, Patsy Hornberger of Sunman.  Besides her parents, she was preceded in death by her husband, Ralph F. Schaefer; a brother and sister-in-law, Jim and Evelyn Hornberger; brother, Dale Hornberger; and two brothers-in-law, Dale Gunter and David Richter. Gayle A. Schaefer, of Sunman, was born on August 22, 1935 in Sunman, a daughter to Paul E. Sr., and Frieda E. Schantz Hornberger.  She married Ralph F. Schaefer on September 17, 1956 at St. Paul Catholic Church in New Alsace and together they raised five daughters.  Gayle worked at Western-Southern Life in the office until Ralph and she started their family. She later went back to work at Weber’s Greenhouse and McPhersons.  She attended St. Jacob’s UCC-Blue Creek, and was widely known for her beautiful flowers and prosperous garden.  Gayle’s favorite hobby however was shopping, especially for shoes!  She loved spending time with her family, and going to craft shows.  Christmas was her favorite holiday and she always had the perfect tree.  On Tuesday, July 10, 2018 at the age of 82, Gayle passed away at Christ Hospital in Cincinnati.center_img Friends may visit with the family on Friday, July 13, 2018 from 4 until 8 p.m. at Cook Rosenberger Funeral Home, 107 Vine Street, Sunman.  Pastor Lynne Busch will officiate the funeral service on Saturday at St. Jacobs UCC-Blue Creek at 10 a.m. and burial will follow in the church cemetery.last_img read more

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Power outage

first_imgThe Power lost to the previously winless Tulsa Talons 45-22. Maybe Pittsburgh was under the incorrect assumption that Tulsa had to still be licking their wounds after a 69-20 drubbing at the hands of the Arizona Rattlers. Instead it appeared that Tulsa was licking their chops at the prospect of facing the “new kids” on the block. This game was a “turnover fest” for Pittsburgh. The Power ended the game with five turnovers. In the land of midget or any other football league, amateur or professional, it is very difficult to win if your team commits five turnovers. Power Head Coach Chris Siegfried put it this way, “There’s not many teams you can turn the ball over to five times and win in this league. Well coach I am in complete agreement with you. Although Morelli threw his first AFL touchdown pass, he still appeared to be a bit “skittish” in the pocket. Morelli does not seem to be the short or long term answer for the Power at QB. The “bye” week for the Power will not be a time to relax. They have to get their offense at least semi-healthy until starting quarterback Bernard Morris is healthy because as we all should know at least by now; in the NFL defense wins championships, in the AFL offense will more than likely win the Holy Grail.Lip serviceThere was a schoolmate who I despised. He really got on my last nerve. I was a tad bit apprehensive about fighting this boy. Don’t ask me why, I had never seen him fight but this was just a vibe that I had. However, I mustered up enough nerve to challenge this “cat” and I lost the fight. A few months later, we rumbled again and I lost that contest as well. I am not a dodo bird. There was not going to be a third fight because I was not going to lose three successive battles to him or any other person.Take the Pitt men’s’ basketball team led by Head Coach Jamie Dixon. For the second year in a row, Dixon’s group of six foot plus couch potatoes were getting their snacks ready in preparation to view the NCAA championship game between Butler and the University of Connecticut. Some people are again describing Butler’s ascension as a storybook scenario. Last year Butler may have composed a “storybook” but this year the small school has published a “textbook.” Butler is writing a new manual; the title is “How to beat the Big Boys.” How could Butler’s head Coach Brad Stevens not have won coach of the year?Dixon may have won the coach of the year award but Stevens is winning the big games. See, the coach of the year award has been in a few glaring cases awarded as a result of the politics of who you know as opposed to what is actually happening on the court. Butler is 10-1 in their last 11 NCAA tournament appearances. Butler does not mind getting grimy and sweaty doing all of the little things to make life a bed of roses for themselves a bed of nails for their opponents. Hey get this; Butler has an approximate student population of less than 4437 students. The University of Pittsburgh on the other hand has over 27,000 students.The Pitt “ZOO” student body fan club has approximately 1400 members. That number is just 79 students shy of equaling one-third of the total student population of Butler.How can such a small school win the big games? Well in my opinion, humility, tenacity and great coaching. Your squad has to be totally and genuinely humble.Not the artificial humility displayed on the press conference podium after another predictable loss but a strong and truly gracious humility. Secondly, when no one expects your team to do much of anything, then your players have to have and display the tenacity of a school of piranhas.The game plan must be just as tenacious and fearless as the players on the court. A game plan cannot be tailored on how to badger and work certain officials. Trying to manipulate the psyches of certain officials so that calls will go your way takes the focus away from you strategizing so that the game will go your way. We should be so lucky to have the Butler “ambiance” and attitude at Pitt.(Aubrey Bruce can be reached at: abruce@newpittsburghcourier.com or 412-583-6741.) Hey, just when I was flexing my muscles when it came to the Pittsburgh Power, reality stepped in and won over imagination. The reality is that this is a “rookie” franchise with a lot of growing to do. First of all let’s discuss the position of quarterback. The loss of the mobility and ability of starting QB Bernard Morris who is currently on injured reserve was evident as 2nd team QB Kevin McCabe struggled mightily and was eventually yanked for 3rd stringer Anthony Morelli, the former Penn State star who for all intents and purposes was even worse. McCabe, who is known for his accurate passing but not his mobility, did not display the precision that is normally his calling card.last_img read more