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Australian Solar Installations Set Record in 2017

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Bloomberg:Australia, one of the world’s biggest users of rooftop solar panels, likely added the most new capacity on record last year as electricity users sought to ease escalating power bills.A preliminary estimate by Australia’s Clean Energy Regulator of 1.05 gigawatts installed last year would be a record for the country, the government body said in an emailed statement Friday. While subsidies and generous feed-in tariffs helped boost growth earlier this decade, last year’s gains were driven by users seeking to sidestep a surge in the cost of electricity and a push by vendors into the commercial sector, according to Bloomberg New Energy Finance.“We are on track to have had the biggest year yet for installed small-scale solar capacity” in 2017, according to the regulator statement. “What we have seen is that homeowners and businesses continue to embrace solar panel systems, which is driving increased levels of capacity across Australia.”The shift to solar may have quickened as power prices spiked last year on tight supplies of coal and gas, which fuel the bulk of generation capacity on the national electricity market. BNEF estimates the cost of solar systems for residential customers has declined 44 percent since 2012.“The payback period for residential solar is now as low as it was in 2012, when super-generous feed-in tariffs and subsidies drove a massive boom in installations,” said BNEF’s Sydney-based analyst Annabel Wilton.Rooftop solar will account for as much as 24 percent of Australia’s electricity by 2040, according to BNEF’s 2017 New Energy Outlook. When combined with small-scale batteries and demand response initiatives, up to 45 percent of the country’s total power capacity will be located on owners’ properties—known as behind-the-meter-capacity—by 2040.More: Surging Power Bills Spark Rush for Household Solar in Australia Australian Solar Installations Set Record in 2017last_img read more

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Racism still rife in South Africa despite the fall of apartheid

first_imgRace relations are a critical fault line in South Africa, with over 500 racism-related cases reported to the South African Human Rights Commission in the past year alone.The United Nations has recently warned that racism, intolerance and discrimination are increasing in many parts of the world. There has been a resurgence of overt racism in South Africa.The Nelson Mandela and Ahmed Kathrada Foundations – both with long histories of facilitating critical dialogue on issues of race relations – have partnered with other civil society organisations to respond to and better understand race relations in the country. Both organizations want to ensure that anti racism strategies are mainstreamed across all sectors of the country. The anti racism network’s ultimate vision is of a South Africa free of racism.last_img read more

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Leeds owner Cellino gets 18-month ban and hefty fine

first_img(REUTERS) – Leeds United owner Massimo Cellino has received an 18-month ban from the Football Association and fined £250 000.The Italian was punished for breaching agent rules over the sale of striker Ross McCormack to Championship rivals Fulham in 2014.“Mr Cellino has been suspended for 18 months from being a director or shadow director of Leeds United or any other football club or company whose activities include ownership of a football club,” the FA said in a statement yesterday.“By April 30 2017 he is to attend and complete an FA education programme covering the duties and responsibilities of an owner and director of an English football club.”It is the third time Cellino, 60, has been banned since taking over at Leeds in April 2014. The suspension will begin in February and run until September 2018.Leeds were also fined 250,000 pounds while agent Derek Day was fined 75,000 pounds and banned for 18 months.Last week Italian businessman Andrea Radrizzani said he was in “advanced negotiations” with Cellino over buying a 50 percent stake in the club with a view to taking complete control next year. Leeds, who are fourth in the table, travel to second-placed Brighton and Hove Albion today.last_img read more

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MBB : Syracuse zone faces tough challenge against talented Ohio State frontcourt

first_imgBOSTON – The zone defense is a distant concept to those who don’t play it. Opponents preparing to play the Syracuse 2-3 zone tend to chuckle when asked about it.Teams like Wisconsin and Ohio State do not entertain the thought of playing zone. It works for Syracuse, but not for them.Ohio State superstar Jared Sullinger, for instance, cannot comprehend defending an area, rather than a player.‘I know you guard an area but sometimes I kind of get into man concept and all of a sudden you see me flying at a pick and roll or something,’ he said. ‘I’m thinking to myself, like, ‘Wasn’t I supposed to be in the middle of this 2-3 zone?’ So I really don’t know how to play it.’Sullinger does not play zone, but his skill set matches up well against the Syracuse defense. The Orange, making its first Elite Eight appearance since 2003, faces a difficult challenge guarding the frontcourt tandem of Sullinger and Deshaun Thomas. Sullinger, the Buckeyes’ star forward, averages 17.6 points and 9.2 rebounds per game. Thomas, a versatile forward, is averaging 20.7 points over his last 11 games.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textWisconsin utilized its outside shooting to keep pace with Syracuse (34-2) in the Sweet 16, but the Orange now has to turn its attention to limiting the Buckeyes’ (30-7) inside scoring when the Nos. 1 and 2 seeds in the East Region square off on Saturday at 7:05 p.m. at the TD Garden. A spot in next week’s Final Four in New Orleans is on the line.In order for Syracuse to get there for the first time in nine years, it must defeat what may be its toughest opponent of the season.‘I think they’re the best team I’ve seen all year long in terms of total makeup and what they do,’ head coach Jim Boeheim said.The dominant inside players for Ohio State are even tougher to defend because of the Buckeyes’ ability to score on the perimeter. Thomas is a supreme all-around playmaker who can make a shot from anywhere on the court. OSU has a quality point guard in Aaron Craft and another gifted outside shooter in William Buford.Thus, Ohio State has the talent to move the ball around and make plays. Thomas said his goal is to be all over the court in an effort to confuse the SU big men.‘We just need to play our role, stretch them out, and getting in the open seams and just knocking down shots,’ Thomas said. ‘We’re going to stretch their bigs out there.’In his press conference on Friday, Boeheim was asked multiple questions about his dedication and persistence in using the zone. Time and time again, after games such as the Sweet 16 matchup with Wisconsin – when the Badgers made 14 3s – the strategy of playing zone is questioned.Saturday’s game with the preseason No. 3 team in the nation presented the issue of how Syracuse could contain Sullinger and Thomas moving around. The Orange will be tested by how well it closes on the soft spots in its zone.‘We just got to make them uncomfortable,’ C.J. Fair said. ‘We can’t let Sullinger get deep position with a clear pass. So we just got to do a good job denying him and then locating their shooters like Buford and Thomas.’Sullinger is not an uber-athletic big man, but he can score inside, has a mid-range jump shot and is a quality rebounder. Sullinger and Thomas are Nos. 1 and 2 in the Big Ten in offensive rebounds, giving them a leg up in one of Syracuse’s weakest parts of the game.And Sullinger’s best attribute might be his deft passing ability. The 6-foot-9, 280-pound sophomore is able to break out of double teams and sticky situations by finding the right teammate at the right time.James Southerland said Syracuse has played a couple teams with big men who were solid passers. Southerland said the key to containing Sullinger will be forcing him to take shots over taller defenders, which is one element he tends to struggle with.‘He gets it in his hands, bad things happen for opposing defenses,’ SU assistant coach Mike Hopkins said. ‘So we got to do a good job to limit his touches and when he gets it, be able to play it as good and physical as we can.’Both Sullinger and Thomas are capable of scoring 25-plus points on any given night. Immense pressure will be on Rakeem Christmas, Baye Keita and the Syracuse forwards to limit their opportunities and deny easy buckets.‘We know it’s a very daunting task to play them,’ Boeheim said. ‘You know, we’ve prepared for it. We’re ready to play them. I hope it’ll be a great game.’mcooperj@syr.edu Published on March 23, 2012 at 12:00 pm Contact Mark: mcooperj@syr.edu | @mark_cooperjr Commentscenter_img Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more