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IMCA Speedway Motors Weekly Racing National Point Standings Through Feb. 05

first_imgIMCA Xtreme Motor Sports Modifieds – 1. Zane DeVilbiss, Farmington, N.M., 220; 2. Jeffry Sheppard Jr., Golden Valley, Ariz., 183; 3. Tim Ward, Gilbert, Ariz., 182; 4. John Parmeley, Phoe­nix, Ariz., 151; 5. Brian Schultz, Casa Grande, Ariz., 149; 6. Lance Mari, El Centro, Calif., 145; 7. Paul Stone, Winton, Calif., 144; 8. Collen Winebarger, Corbett, Ore., 143; 9. Scott Sluka, Fair­banks, Alaska, and Ricky Thornton Jr., Chandler, Ariz., both 119; 11. Marlyn Seidler, Underwood, N.D., and Ryan McDaniel, Olivehurst, Calif., both 114; 13. Tyler Mecl, Queen Creek, Ariz., 110; 14. Shawn Strand, Man­dan, N.D., 105; 15. Alexander Wilson, Salinas, Calif., 104; 16. Kellen Chad­wick, Oakley, Ca­lif., 100; 17. Eric Center, Mesa, Ariz., and Troy Foulger, Martinez, Calif., both 97; 19. Spencer Wilson, Minot, N.D., 92; 20. George Fronsman, Surprise, Ariz., 89.Karl Chevrolet Northern SportMods – 1. Fred Ryland, Brentwood, Calif., 119; 2. Wayne Dot­son, Bakersfield, Calif., 103; 3. Richard Mueller Jr., Jackson, Wyo., 101; 4. Megan Ponciano, Oak­ley, Calif., 72; 5. Josh Hensley, Atwater, Calif., 70; 6. Jeremy Hoff, Copperopolis, Calif., and Al Johnson, Antioch, Calif., both 68; 8. Ryan Larimer, Merced, Calif., 62; 9. Matt Mayo, Bakers­field, Calif., 61; 10. Anthony Giuliani, Morgan Hill, Calif., 56; 11. Alan Pace, Riverbank, Calif., 54; 12. Chris Toth, Holtville, Calif., 40; 13. Austin Ruskauff, Santa Maria, Calif., 39; 14. Neill Barcel­los, Atwater, Calif., Bruce Nelson, Tur­lock, Calif., and Larry Wyatt, Imperial, Calif., each 38; 17. Jason Linn, Yuma, Ariz., 37; 18. Miles Morris, Yuma, Ariz., 35; 19. Kyle Smith, Yuma, Ariz., 34; 20. Steve Kihle, Williston, N.D., 32.last_img read more

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Gregan through to semi-finals

first_img “I’m absolutely delighted,” he said. “I’ve had my share of bad luck at major championships and I wasn’t particularly expecting any good luck at these. “I thought I was out initially, but to run that fast that early in the day isn’t easy for me, I’m not really a morning person. “I will be a lot happier running tomorrow evening now in the semis.” The only other Irish athlete in action was Tori Pena in the women’s pole vault. The national record holder went out of the competition at the qualification stage after failing to make 4.55 metres. Ireland’s Brian Gregan secured his place in the 400 metres semi-final at the World Championships in Moscow. The 23-year-old crossed the line in 46.04 seconds, putting him sixth in the second heat. Only the first four in each heat automatically qualified, but Gregan went through as the third of the four fastest losers. center_img Press Associationlast_img read more

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Curry has shaken up collegiate basketball

first_imgI used to think Steph Curry ruined basketball.He was too much of a show-off. He sank those deep-ball 3-pointers that arced high enough to kiss the rafters of Oracle Arena before splashing without even skimming the rim. His touch was special enough or just downright lucky enough to ensure success for his Golden State Warriors, even when he was heaving it from half-court.I knew he was good, in the same way that most of the football-loving population of America acknowledges Tom Brady’s skill while cursing him in the same breath. But I couldn’t stand the way he approached regular season games like a glorified All-Star Weekend Three-Point Contest with a few defenders scattered around the court. That wasn’t how to play basketball.What I resented most was the effect he had on young players. Elementary school kids started spending hours jacking up 30-foot jumpers that fell short with monotonous certainty. That obsession somehow trickled into college and professional ball, with more players taking shots from behind the arc.Curry can take full credit. He can also take credit for this season of NCAA play, which has seen a focus on guard-heavy offense that utilizes only one post in the paint and emphasizes a spread attack. When I first saw this style of play come to the forefront of all my favorite teams’ strategy, I hated it. But after the Trojans upset UCLA at the Galen Center last week, I came to realize that this new style of play — the Curry method, if you will — might be exactly what college basketball needs. I grew up watching the University of Kansas Jayhawks, back when they cycled through phenomenal big men like Cole Aldrich, the Morris twins and even Joel Embiid for a fleeting season. The post position is gritty, physical and aggressive. The footwork is subtle and every shot is contested. And post defense is more personal than defense in any other position of any other team sport: Players on both sides spend the majority of the game jamming elbows into each other’s guts and slapping at arms, shoulders and loose balls. For all these reasons, it was my favorite position to play and to watch.Kansas always brought the heat in the paint. The team was centered around a corps of big men trained by former NCAA powerhouse Danny Manning to demolish the rim with rote proficiency: The Jayhawks’ posts were bigger, stronger and just plain meaner than their competition. They provided the muscle down low necessary to pull out Big 12 championships with an almost stupefying consistency. As a young Kansas fan, I had my first encounter with Curry. He was a scrawny junior from Davidson College, his uniform practically falling off his wiry shoulders, and he was dead set on knocking the Jayhawks out of the Elite Eight, one wild jump shot after another.Despite being an undeniably better team than Davidson, the Jayhawks barely squeaked out a 59-57 victory. But Curry’s 25 points almost pulled his underdog team into the Final Four.How’d he do it? Curry, true to form, took 16 attempts from behind the arc, more than the entire Kansas team attempted. The Jayhawks scrambled to cover his 3-point heroics, and though the team continued on to the national championship, the near-loss exposed a defensive weakness.The main effectiveness of the 3-point shot is its ability to spread a defense. A traditional offense allows for posts to guard more tightly in the paint, with wing players remaining as options to double team or to jump into a passing lane. With those wing defenders stretched out to the arc to guard shooters more tightly, the middle of the court is left wide open for guards to drive or pass into their big men.This is simple basketball logic, the type that’s been discussed for decades. But for a long time, most coaches still stuck to the dogma that 3-pointers can’t be the backbone of any offense. Curry, Klay Thompson and the Warriors’ 2015 championship rings politely disagreed.Ultimately, the shift towards a guard-heavy, widely-spread offense wasn’t gradual. It happened over a handful of seasons, enough that I was able to rapidly notice — and bemoan — the change. But then USC took down No. 8 UCLA in dominant fashion after dropping 14 3-pointers, and I began to realize what this change can do for the sport of basketball.The 3-pointer is the ultimate equalizer. It’s the shot that can turn an undersized guard into a team’s golden boy. It sets defenses on their heels and brings stadiums to their feet. And it’s a challenge that’s inherently more difficult to guard.The shift to small ball changes the game. It allows lesser teams to attack with ferocity. It creates space, allows offenses to breathe and demands creativity for both sides of the ball. And no, it’s not the same brutal grind that high-key post play offers. But that’s not necessarily a bad thing.This crafty style of play is evening the playing field for lower-ranked teams like USC, who just need a few minutes of opportunity to break ahead. It keeps teams from being shut down by a few dominant players down low and forces teams to play better defenses. And ultimately, the switch provides high-octane, high-scoring contests that keep the game from ever being predictable for its fans — and they can thank Steph for that.Julia Poe is a sophomore studying print and digital journalism. She is also the sports editor of the Daily Trojan. Her column, Poe’s Perspective, runs on Wednesdays.last_img read more

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Man United want Germany star, Chelsea to swoop for Payet, Balotelli to Besiktas?

first_imgHere are the top transfer-related stories in Friday’s newspapers…Manchester United are plotting a move for Wolfsburg midfielder Julian Draxler, 22, less than a year after the German international joined them in a £25.5m switch from Bundesliga rivals Schalke. (Bild)Manchester United will explore the chances of signing Real Madrid defender Raphael Varane this summer. The Red Devils have splashed £25m on Eric Bailly from Villarreal but there are doubts over whether he is ready to be a first-team regular. (Daily Mirror)West Ham fear Dimitri Payet may become impossible to hold onto if he continues to light up Euro 2016. Payet has been the player of the tournament so far, further enhancing his reputation after a stunning debut season in the Premier League. Chelsea are monitoring Payet’s situation but it is the interest of Spanish giants Real Madrid that is likely to cause more alarm for Hammers chiefs. (Daily Mirror)West Ham United are weighing up a second bid of £8 million for Bournemouth winger Matt Ritchie. Slaven Bilic is ready to return with an improved offer for the Scotland international after a joint bid for Ritchie and striker Callum Wilson was rejected last month. (Daily Telegraph)Bournemouth’s Eddie Howe has dropped off the current shortlist of candidates to replace Ronald Koeman at Southampton, with former Lille and Roma manager Rudi Garcia also now under serious consideration. (Daily Telegraph)Juventus are worried they will not get to bring Juan Cuadrado back to Italy because new Chelsea boss Antonio Conte is prepared to hand him another chance in the Premier League. (Daily  Mail)Chelsea target Radja Nainggolan has “promised” he’ll stay at Roma this summer, says Luciano Spalletti. (Daily Mail)Liverpool hope to offload Kop flop Mario Balotelli to Besiktas. Balotelli, 25, has been looking for a new club since AC Milan opted not to sign him when his loan spell ended last month and the striker’s agent Mino Raiola says Besiktas are keen. (Daily Mirror)Leicester boss Claudio Ranieri is close to clinching the £12million signing of Nice midfielder Nampalys Mendy. (Daily Express)Robbie Brady is expected to leave Norwich following their relegation last season and is a possible transfer target for Hull, who sold the Irish winger last summer for £7m. (Hull Daily Mail)West Bromwich Albion have confirmed interest in Franco Vazquez, but denied the Italian international’s claim a bid had been made. (Birmingham Mail)Anthony Stokes has agreed to join Blackburn Rovers. The Ireland international will pen a three-year deal with Owen Coyle’s side after leaving Celtic. (Daily Express)Queens Park Rangers’ attempts to sell Sandro have been hit after the Brazilian midfielder failed a medical at Sporting Lisbon. Sandro had agreed a three year deal in Lisbon, after QPR had accepted a cut-price fee of £1.5m for a permanent transfer.  But a medical in Portugal last week revealed a problem with Sandro’s knee which saw the move collapse. (Independent)And here are the latest talkSPORT.com headlines…‘He wants to go to Manchester United!’ – Agent reveals Henrikh Mkhitaryan’s Red Devils dreamRangers transfer news: Gers close in on Clint Hill as former QPR defender set for Friday medicalChelsea and Manchester City battle for Switzerland defender Stephan LichtsteinerTottenham transfer news: Spurs face fight as Bundesliga side confirm talks with Vincent JanssenChelsea transfer news: Inter Milan rivalling Blues for Italian international Antonio CandrevaChelsea transfer news: Blues face battle with Carlo Ancelotti’s Bayern Munich for Kalidou KoulibalyManchester United transfer report: Breel Embolo offered stunning wage package but starlet’s MUM holding up deallast_img read more