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Companies in VOSHA’s Green Mountain Voluntary Protection Programs perform better than national average

first_imgCompanies enrolled in the VOSHA Green Mountain Voluntary Protection Programs (GMVPP) have, once again, performed at a higher level than the national average of their peers in the area of reportable jobsite injuries and illnesses, as reported by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), Incidence rates of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses by industry and case types, 2008.In the latest 2008 BLS report, two important performance measures are tracked and compared to the North American Industrial Classification Code System (NAICS) for each industry type. The first is the industry Total Case Incident Rate (TCIR). This rate is a reflection of the worksite s total recordable cases in a calendar year. The second is the Days Away Restricted and/or Transferred rate (DART). This rate reflects the number of recordable cases in a calendar year that result in an employee missing time from work or having to perform duties which are not their normal jobsite duties due to the injury or illness. These rates are reflected in a percentage per 1000 employees in a particular NAICS industry type.For the 2009 calendar year all of the employers recognized by the GMVPP have outperformed the latest injury and illness statistics. The following are the performance numbers listed as a percentage below the related BLS average for their respective industries.Ben and Jerry s Homemade, Saint Albans Manufacturing FacilityTCIR 64% DART 52%United Water NACO, Saint Johnsbury Waste Water Treatment FacilityTCIR 100%, No recordable cases DART 100%, No recordable casesEnergizer Battery, Bennington Manufacturing FacilityTCIR 61% DART 88%Energizer Battery, Saint Albans Manufacturing FacilityTCIR 30% DART 16%G.E. Aviation, Rutland ManufacturingTCIR 31% DART 42%IBM, Essex JunctionTCIR 31% DART 17%Entergy Nuclear Vermont Yankee, VernonTCIR 60% DART 100%, No recordable casesVermont Agency of Transportation, District 7, Saint JohnsburyTCIR 58% DART 100%, No recordable casesThe GMVPP is a VOSHA partnership program that recognizes worksites with exemplary safety and health management systems in place. Those systems are based on four core values: 1) Management Commitment and Employee Involvement; 2) Worksite Hazard Assessment; 3) Hazard Prevention and Control; and 4) Employee Safety and Health Training.last_img read more

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Vast Renewable-Energy Potential Across U.S. Tribal Lands

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Abby Kessler for E&E:According to a report published by the Department of Energy, reservation lands have the potential to produce about 6 percent of the nation’s renewable energy, although reservations make up just 2 percent of total U.S. land.And despite the potential, Bob Gough, secretary of the Intertribal Council on Utility Policy, or ICOUP, said “next to nothing” is being harnessed.The resources aren’t being tapped due to many factors, including hefty upfront investments required, lack of knowledge about how to plan for such a project and connectivity issues to the nation’s power grid in rural areas.During a DOE presentation last month, John Steward, acting manager for the transmission business unit at the Western Area Power Administration, estimated a feasibility study for implementing renewables would cost an estimated $10,000. A system impact study and environmental assessment would also have to be conducted, preliminary steps that would push the price of potential projects even higher.Sean Esterly, project lead at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, said funding is “definitely the biggest issue” tribes face when transitioning to renewable energy.Various financing programs are available for federally recognized tribes that provide funds and assistance to nations interested in assessing the potential for renewables on their land. DOE said that between 2002 and 2014, the agency invested $48 million in 183 tribal clean energy projects valued at about $93 million.But, Gough said, the government’s investment in renewables on tribal land is markedly smaller when dispersed among more than 500 federally recognized tribes.Funding shortages may be a concern, but Esterly said connecting tribes to those grants is an important step that is frequently overlooked. He said the tribes aren’t always aware that grant dollars are available to invest in such projects.“Unfortunately, due to capacity of some of the tribes and lack of knowledge of which of the resources they can take advantage, a lot of the opportunities are falling through the cracks,” he said.Another issue is access to the grid. Reservations typically are not well connected to the power grid, making transportation of generated energy an expensive endeavor.U.S. utilities “are operating off of 19th-century organization, 20th-century technology and 21st-century needs,” Gough said of the nation’s grid, noting the aging infrastructure is stymying the entire country’s conversion to cleaner power sources.He said the Great Plains region offers immense wind potential, while the Southwest offers ample possibilities for solar.A recent study from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the University of Colorado, Boulder, said wind and sunshine could power most of the United States by 2030. Over large geographic regions, weather trends tend to average out, meaning spreading renewables over swaths of land could smooth highs and lows in electricity output (ClimateWire, Jan. 26).The issue is not intermittency, Gough said, rather the nation’s utility infrastructure.Full article: Renewables offer glimmer of hope for isolated reservations Vast Renewable-Energy Potential Across U.S. Tribal Landslast_img read more

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Racism still rife in South Africa despite the fall of apartheid

first_imgRace relations are a critical fault line in South Africa, with over 500 racism-related cases reported to the South African Human Rights Commission in the past year alone.The United Nations has recently warned that racism, intolerance and discrimination are increasing in many parts of the world. There has been a resurgence of overt racism in South Africa.The Nelson Mandela and Ahmed Kathrada Foundations – both with long histories of facilitating critical dialogue on issues of race relations – have partnered with other civil society organisations to respond to and better understand race relations in the country. Both organizations want to ensure that anti racism strategies are mainstreamed across all sectors of the country. The anti racism network’s ultimate vision is of a South Africa free of racism.last_img read more