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Australian Solar Installations Set Record in 2017

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Bloomberg:Australia, one of the world’s biggest users of rooftop solar panels, likely added the most new capacity on record last year as electricity users sought to ease escalating power bills.A preliminary estimate by Australia’s Clean Energy Regulator of 1.05 gigawatts installed last year would be a record for the country, the government body said in an emailed statement Friday. While subsidies and generous feed-in tariffs helped boost growth earlier this decade, last year’s gains were driven by users seeking to sidestep a surge in the cost of electricity and a push by vendors into the commercial sector, according to Bloomberg New Energy Finance.“We are on track to have had the biggest year yet for installed small-scale solar capacity” in 2017, according to the regulator statement. “What we have seen is that homeowners and businesses continue to embrace solar panel systems, which is driving increased levels of capacity across Australia.”The shift to solar may have quickened as power prices spiked last year on tight supplies of coal and gas, which fuel the bulk of generation capacity on the national electricity market. BNEF estimates the cost of solar systems for residential customers has declined 44 percent since 2012.“The payback period for residential solar is now as low as it was in 2012, when super-generous feed-in tariffs and subsidies drove a massive boom in installations,” said BNEF’s Sydney-based analyst Annabel Wilton.Rooftop solar will account for as much as 24 percent of Australia’s electricity by 2040, according to BNEF’s 2017 New Energy Outlook. When combined with small-scale batteries and demand response initiatives, up to 45 percent of the country’s total power capacity will be located on owners’ properties—known as behind-the-meter-capacity—by 2040.More: Surging Power Bills Spark Rush for Household Solar in Australia Australian Solar Installations Set Record in 2017last_img read more

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UK public sector funds back climate change policies

first_imgA trio of Local Government Pension Schemes (LGPS) have pledged to align their investment portfolios with the goals of the Paris Climate agreement.The pension funds for Merseyside, Islington, and the Environment Agency – which run more than £13.5bn (€15.4bn) between them – were joined by the Brunel Pension Partnership, one of the LGPS asset pools. The funds said they would work to increase their allocations to low-carbon investments such as sustainable infrastructure, and reduce their exposure to carbon-intensive assets.Paul Doughty, chair of Merseyside Pension Fund, said his scheme would shift a third of its passive UK and US equity allocation to low-carbon benchmarks by the end of the year. “We also plan to continue to increase our significant investment in infrastructure, with an expected £250m investment in renewables by 2020,” he added. Some investors are reducing their exposure to industries that produce carbon as a byproduct LGPS funds are aiming to put more money into renewable energyIslington Pension Fund chairman David Poyser said his scheme had cut its passive portfolio’s carbon footprint by 45% and would seek to carry out similar reductions in other areas.The Environment Agency Pension Fund has been a leading global advocate of sustainable investing for more than a decade, and Brunel has embraced this effort since setting up last year. Several former Environment Agency staff now hold senior positions at the pool. The investors worked with campaign group ShareAction on the announcement, which was made during Green GB week.ShareAction said the moves were “all the more urgent” given the findings of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, which reported last week that limiting global warming to 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels “would require rapid, far-reaching and unprecedented changes in all aspects of society” over the next 12 years. Claire PerryClaire Perry, UK minister for energy and clean growth, said: “The UK has led the world in cutting emissions whilst growing our economy, with clean growth driving incredible innovation and creating hundreds of thousands of high quality jobs.“Ten years on from the Climate Change Act, the first ever Green GB week is a time to build on our successes and explain the huge opportunities for business and young people of a cleaner economy. “I’m delighted to see how many more businesses and organisations such as ShareAction are seizing this multi-billion pound opportunity to energise their communities to tackle the very serious threat of climate change.” Brunel has been set up to run £28.9bn of assets on behalf of 10 LGPS funds, including the Environment Agency.last_img read more

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Fast reaction: 3 quick takeaways from Syracuse’s 59-44 loss to No. 2 Virginia

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Small groups of fans began to file out of the Carrier Dome as early as the nine-minute mark in the second half, after Tyus Battle missed back-to-back free throws. The almost-certain outcome had become clear to them at that point, as Syracuse’s offense sputtered to 27 points through 31 minutes. SU’s offensive woes have now spanned three games, as the Orange (15-8, 4-6 Atlantic Coast) lost to No.2-ranked Virginia (22-1, 11-0), 59-44, on Saturday afternoon inside the Carrier Dome.In front of the biggest on-campus crowd in college basketball this season (27,083), only two SU players reached double figures for a season-worst offensive performance against the best defense in the country. The Orange has beaten a Top 10 team every season since 2006-07 but has yet to do so this season as it embarks on the final month of the regular season with eight games to play.Here are three quick takeaways from Syracuse’s loss to the Cavaliers.It’s the name of the gameAfter a fairly strong first 12 minutes offensively — SU kept pace by moving well, finding gaps and scoring opportunities in the Cavaliers’ top-ranked defense — Syracuse struggled to score the basketball. At about the seven-minute mark in the first half, sophomore guard Tyus Battle knocked down a jumper to make it 20-18. The Orange didn’t score again for six-plus minutes, resembling a recurring theme for SU: a fledgling offense.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textThe Orange has scored 70 points just twice over the past month and a half, making it difficult for even the strongest of 2-3 zones to pick up the slack against quality opponents, such as No. 2 Virginia. It won’t get much easier, as SU plays at Louisville in 48 hours, before playing formidable opposition in North Carolina, Duke and Clemson in the next month.Saturday, SU shot 4-for-21 from deep. There were few open shots. When SU did get one, it came late in the possession. Only Battle and junior point guard Frank Howard, who didn’t come off the floor, reached double figures. The Orange shot 33.3 percent from the field.PressLess than two years ago, Syracuse implemented a full-court press to stun Virginia and become Final Four bound. This time, the Orange turned to its press much earlier in the second half, after SU’s first made basket. It produced an immediate corner trap, from which the ball was knocked out of bounds. UVA broke the press, though, with a few passes on the ensuing inbounds that led to a transition bucket. The Cavaliers worked the middle of the court to produce two-on-one situations at the other end.SU utilized the press only sparingly because it pressures the other team only after made baskets, which were infrequent on the low-scoring afternoon.Staying thinSyracuse head coach Jim Boeheim historically has not played much of a bench, especially in recent years.“You only need five,” he said last week after SU’s win over Pittsburgh. “You can get by.”The only player who came off the bench Saturday was redshirt freshman forward Matthew Moyer. Boeheim said after SU’s loss at Georgia Tech on Wednesday that former walk-on guard Braedon Bayer would get time against Virginia, but he did not play. With freshman guard Howard Washington out for the season and Bourama Sidibe battling tendinitis in his knee, only Moyer comes off the bench to provide a few moments for starters to rest. He came in for Chukwu or Marek Dolezaj. Virginia finished with 27 bench points to SU’s zero. Comments Published on February 3, 2018 at 5:56 pm Contact Matthew: mguti100@syr.edu | @MatthewGut21last_img read more