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Brazilian Defense Minister Warns about Multiple Perceptions in the Continent

first_img The creation of an Inter-American defense system is threatened by the existing “multiple perceptions” in the continent, Brazilian Minister of Defense Celso Amorim told AFP on October 8. The official added that cooperation must be based on “new premises.” “We can cooperate on issues of health, defense, and natural disasters, always with the intervention of civil authorities. However, the idea of an Inter-American defense system, first conceived after World War II, has no connection with today’s multi-polar world, threatened by several dangers, and where there is not even an homogeneous continent,” he indicated. “We think that we should move away from considering an Inter-American defense system, while we should approach defense cooperation mechanisms between countries in the Americas, for which there is an urgent need,” explained Amorim, who participated in discussions during the 10th Conference of Defense Ministers of the Americas on October 8, hours before returning to his country. The effectiveness of the Inter-American defense system was one of the main issues discussed at the conference – in which 29 out of 34 countries participated . Amorim highlighted that his country’s priorities are the Union of South American Nations (UNASUR) and the South American Defense Council. The official stated that Brazil’s and other regional countries’ main defense concerns have to do more with natural resources, such as the capacity for food production, and main water and energy reserves, than external threats from countries. However, he said, international terrorism, illegal immigration and the proliferation of weapons, are not an issue for the region. Brazil’s current defense minister and former minister of foreign relations said that he considered unlikely the approval of an initiative promoted by Chile and supported by the United States to create a coordination mechanism for humanitarian assistance in natural disasters. “There might be progress in understanding how to cooperate in natural disasters, without creating a unique and unified system,” he said. “We can also keep moving forward in peacekeeping cooperation alternatives, without forgetting that United Nations and the Security Council are the rightful institutions to approve the initiatives,” he concluded. It is important to consider that there are different perceptions, besides that it is very difficult to achieve similar perceptions. However, a great effort should be always done to get a general agreement, respecting the different and supreme countries’ interests. Hobert By Dialogo October 10, 2012last_img read more

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Honduran Military Students Develop Bomb-Dismantling Robot

first_imgBy Dialogo November 09, 2015 The example given to us by the Brazilian Army regarding the abundance of wildlife or jungle life that exists in Brazil is magnificent. We, the Hondurans, should learn about this experience to apply it, as appropriate, in our country, Honduras. Jorge Arturo Reina Idiáquez The military students’ work is helping the country meet modern-day security challenges. Students and military authorities will continue adjusting the robot before it’s used in the field. Before working on the robot, UDH’s military students developed drones, known as “weevils,” for reconnaissance and to record images authorities are using in forest areas to monitor the impact of climate change. A versatile device “These drones will enable us to monitor what is happening. They have a flight range of four to five kilometers, so they could also be used if there’s a fire,” said Rear Admiral Ramón Cristóbal Romero Burgos, UDH’s vice chancellor. In 2014, the students started designing the robot, which functions as a steel-armored vehicle, similar to a combat tank, but with an infrared camera system to record movements from up to 100 meters without difficulty, according to engineer León Rojas, chairman of UDH’s Technology Innovation Department. The prototype, which is about 1.5 meters wide by 2 meters long, will feature brushless motors with power regulators to give it the stability to traverse obstacles. Commander Mario Vázquez, chief of UDH’s Research and Development Department added: “The intent is for the Honduran Army, Navy, and Air Force to provide us with their projects or subjects to be developed to improve any instrument they have to halt the so-called new threats, thus benefiting the country’s security. It would also be a great experience to contact and have a scientific exchange with other international research universities to bolster our programs.” The UDH is renowned for its excellence in educating and training Military professionals and select civilians. Military mechatronic engineers educated there are professionals with a solid base of training and knowledge in basic military scientific technology and managing computer tools, as well as in the design and automation of mechatronic systems, control systems, industrial electronic systems, and the manufacturing of materials. A record of technological innovation “Honduras and its Armed Forces will reap benefits from this project,” Rojas said. “We expect a positive impact on deterrence of any sort of contingency or attempt to locate a bomb, knowing the Army, Navy, and Air Force have a response.” Twenty-four military students majoring in mechatronics engineering at Honduras’s Defense University (UDH) are designing a bomb-dismantling robot as part of a Ministry of National Defense’s effort that encourages them to develop technological innovations to modernize the Armed Forces’ equipment. In addition to improving public safety, the robot could become profitable. The Military is expected to use it as a reconnaissance vehicle; an automated greenhouse; to assist and aid victims of disasters, such as oil spills and earthquakes; and to control the operation of a conveyor belt or elevator. “This innovation could place the domestic industry in a good position to compete in the international market,” Rojas said in remarks reported by Infodefensa on September 1. “The goal is to sell it.” “Through the military majors of Honduras’s Defense University, the Ministry of Defense intends to provide bachelor’s, master’s, and specialist students in mechatronics with the knowledge they need to conduct research to update the equipment used by the country’s Armed Forces,” Rear Adm. Romero explained. “The goal is to create a wireless, remote-controlled robot to deactivate bombs so we do not expose people to the process of neutralizing an explosive,” said Captain Cobia Fugon, a member of UDH’s Research Department. “The students are working in a synchronized fashion. The specific tasks are divided among groups of three students.” “Honduras must be prepared to meet the threats facing the world today, such as chemical attacks, bombs, arson at refineries, possible anthrax incursions, and drug trafficking,” said Colonel Uriel Cantor Galeano, the National Port Protection Commission’s executive director. “There are many tests being conducted to build the mechanical part,” Capt. Fugon explained. “We have conducted three field tests and achieved the best possible results. There are two or three tests left before we reach our goal.” last_img read more

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Guidance offered for protecting vulnerable groups in flu pandemic

first_imgApr 16, 2008 (CIDRAP News) – Acting on the premise that “disasters discriminate,” the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials (ASTHO) and several partner groups yesterday released a lengthy set of proposed guidelines for protecting the most vulnerable people during an influenza pandemic.The 105-page document posted on the ASTHO Web site contains recommendations on how state, local, territorial, and tribal health agencies can prepare to help “at-risk” groups—such as people who can’t afford to stockpile food, don’t speak English, or need assistance with daily activities—get through a pandemic.”In the face of a pandemic we have to recognize that some of those services that serve them [vulnerable groups] today may be able to expand to meet the need, but some of them will break down,” ASTHO Executive Director Paul E. Jarris, MD, MBA, told CIDRAP News. “How will we provide basic services to people who are homebound, for example, making sure they have food and water and care? This won’t happen by accident.”The guidance document, called “At-Risk Populations and Pandemic Influenza: Planning Guidance for State, Territorial, Tribal, and Local Health Departments,” was developed with input from representatives of the groups the recommendations are intended to help. ASTHO and its partner organizations held public engagement meetings recently in Boston and Kansas City to gather those groups’ suggestions.”The At-Risk Populations Project is a ground-breaking endeavor for the nation,” Jarris said in a news release. “The process is being brought directly to the at-risk populations who will be affected, as well as to the public health planners and other experts who will have responsibility for implementing the policies. Their vital feedback will help to ensure that those facing the most danger during a pandemic are protected.”ASTHO’s partners in the project are the University of Minnesota Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy (CIDRAP), publisher of CIDRAP News; the National Association of County and City Health Officials (NACCHO); and The Keystone Center. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) proposed the project and funded it with a grant to ASTHO.ASTHO seeks public commentsASTHO is inviting the public to comment on the guidance document for 30 days. After that, plans call for editing the document and releasing the final version by May 31, according to Anna DeBlois, ASTHO’s senior director for immunization and infectious disease. The project has been on a tight schedule because of CDC budgetary considerations, said Jarris.The guidance consists of five chapters that discuss how to identify and collaborate with at-risk populations, communicate with and educate them about pandemic flu, provide clinical and non-clinical services to them, and how to test, exercise, measure, and improve their preparedness.At-risk groups are defined as those that have the highest risk of suffering severe consequences from a pandemic or from measures used to fight the pandemic, such as community mitigation strategies. Examples include those who can’t afford to stockpile food or stay home from work for even a short time; those who have no support network, such as homeless people and those who are socially or geographically isolated; and those who need help with daily activities because of physical disabilities, blindness, hearing impairment, medical conditions, or other factors.Each chapter offers detailed background information and a list of recommendations for public health agencies. For example, a section on communicating with at-risk groups discusses potential barriers to communication, the need to develop audience-appropriate messages, possible message content, and the need to find “trusted messengers.” The chapter suggests a wide variety of potential message vehicles, ranging from church bulletins and radio announcements to cars with loudspeakers and “telenovelas,” described as Spanish television mini-series that can be powerful health education vehicles.A few other examples of the many recommendations in the guidance:To identify at-risk groups, use data from transportation and mass-transit planners to find local groups who need help to use public transit.To build collaborations, reach out to community leaders without formal roles, such as elderly people or hairdressers.Offer mini-grants to community-based and faith-based organizations for pandemic preparedness planning, if budgets permit.Provide preparedness workshops for people who support at-risk individuals, including family, friends, and paid caregivers.Encourage community-based and faith-based organizations to develop contracts or memoranda of understanding to provide essential services and supplies during a pandemic.Consider the pros and cons of developing a community registry in which at-risk groups would describe the services and equipment they would need during a pandemic, and work with first responders to make sure the registry provides them useful information.Each chapter also includes a chart of existing tools and resources—most of them accessible online—that may be helpful in carrying out the recommendations.Developing federal guidance outside the governmentASTHO officials credit Toby Merlin, MD, deputy director of the CDC’s Influenza Coordinating Unit, for coming up with the idea for the At-Risk Populations Project, which they describe as unique because it is federal guidance developed by non-federal groups.”Toby Merlin came to us to ask ASTHO to organize, with CIDRAP and Keystone, a process for developing guidance outside the federal government, and also including the very important component of community engagement,” said Jarris. “We’ve had community engagements around pandemic community mitigation measures and vaccine prioritization before, but what was really new was moving the engagement outside the federal government.”ASTHO set up an advisory panel of experts to guide the project and organized five working groups consisting of about 70 people, including academicians and public health practitioners, from around the country to develop the chapters. To get at-risk groups involved, public engagement meetings were held Mar 8 in Boston and Mar 15 in Kansas City, drawing a total of more than 100 people. In addition, a stakeholders meeting was held Mar 20 in Washington, DC, to gather input from groups ranging from the CDC to volunteer organizations that serve vulnerable people.Comments gathered at the meetings led to various additions and adjustments to the guidance, according to Caroline Barnhill, MPH, ASTHO’s senior analyst for infectious diseases. One important point influenced by the feedback was the definition of at-risk groups.”We asked if the groups we had identified were sufficient, and they had some thoughts on the words we used,” Barnhill said. “We took that information into consideration and changed some of the wording to reflect their feedback. It was very helpful.”Overall, the comments didn’t prompt any big changes in direction, but they “enhanced what we were already doing,” Barnhill said. “We got a lot of good anecdotes and points that we hadn’t thought of.”Public engagementOne of those who attended the Boston public meeting is David Mortimer, a Sudbury, Mass., resident who has been in a wheelchair since he was injured in a car accident in 1993. He chairs the city’s disability commission and represents that group on the city emergency planning committee.”My intent [in attending the meeting] was hoping I would find people similar to myself and find out what success they were having in convincing commissions to be more inclusive in their emergency planning,” Mortimer told CIDRAP News.He said the Boston meeting, held at Boston University, drew at least 50 people, consisting mostly of people with limited mobility, those with hearing impairments, and people working with the homeless and those with mental health problems.After being briefed on the project, those attending broke into subgroups and, with the help of facilitators, came up with the suggestions for things to include in the guidance. “There was something in the neighborhood of 15 recommendations that were brought to the full group for comment and feedback,” Mortimer said.He said he was impressed by “the willingness to work from the ground up, not coming in and dictating what people need but going out and asking the affected groups what are their major needs regarding treatment in a pandemic. The process is remarkable and hopefully will be a model.”Mortimer also attended the Washington stakeholders meeting after he was asked to report there on the Boston meeting. In the wake of the meetings, he said, “I think I’ll be bringing a lot more focus to our local emergency planning people about pandemic flu.”He said it was hard to tell how well local planners would heed concerns about pandemic preparedness, since Sudbury is small and has no public health department. “It’ll get added to the many things that I’m a voice crying in the wilderness about,” he said.Filling a needVarious groups have recognized a need for guidance to help protect vulnerable people during a pandemic and have worked on aspects of the problem, but there has been no comprehensive effort until now, according to Jarris and DeBlois.”There’s a recognition that there’s a huge need, but there’s been a real gap in planning guidance for state and local agencies,” said DeBlois. “This project really fills that gap and provides consistent guidance to all the states as to what the best practices and key recommendations are.”The large number and variety of groups that serve vulnerable people made development of the guidance a complex challenge, said DeBlois.”There’s such a huge network of organizations and individuals that serve at-risk populations that it all works together right now like a web of different agencies that are truly the most connected to these folks,” she said. “Understanding how that works and what would need to happen to ensure that at-risk populations continue to be served in such an intense public health emergency was really challenging.”Jarris said he couldn’t predict to what extent public health agencies will use the guidance, but he expressed hope that it would induce them to build relationships with vulnerable groups.”I think there are people who are very hungry for guidance around this [issue],” he said. “So much of this work is building relationships with people in the community and those who are serving them that guidance is only the beginning. . . . There’s no substitute for getting out there and building those relationships.”See also: Full text of “At-Risk Populations and Pandemic Influenza: Planning Guidance for State, Territorial, Tribal and Local Health Departments”http://www.astho.org/Programs/Infectious-Disease/At-Risk-Populations/At-Risk-Pop-and-Pandemic-Influenza-Planning-Guidance-Executive-Summary/ASTHO’s At-Risk Populations Project sitehttp://www.astho.org/Programs/Infectious-Disease/At-Risk-Populations/At-Risk-Populations-Project-Methods,-Timeline,-Advisory-Panel-Members,-and-Project-Staff/last_img read more

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GOP tax plan will hurt all but rich

first_imgWhat we are seeing instead is the elimination of tax Schedule A, Itemized Deductions. This has always been a middle-class benefit which helps young adults afford a home by offsetting the costs of mortgage interest, school, state and local taxes, unexpected high medical costs, and job and educational expenses. Not having this support available will kill the hope of homeownership for our middle-class children.The children of the rich have their educations provided by their parents and already have the benefit of receiving up to $5 million of tax-free inheritance.The GOP tax plans now propose to eliminate the tax on inheritance all together. Reducing corporate taxes only benefits the investors and the CEOs, COOs and CFOs that already are receiving ridiculous salaries and bonuses.Further, how specifically are small, family-owned businesses being helped? The GOP tax plan is going to increase by over a trillion dollars the national debt, which already has reached critical proportions do to the cost of 16 years of GOP sanction wars.Bill SmithMechanicvilleMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationPolice: Schenectady woman tried to take car in Clifton Park hours after arrest, release in prior the…EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homes Categories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionThe Republican Party has consistently stated that cutting taxes and reducing the national debt are high priorities.We are now getting a clear picture of what the party of the rich really intends to accomplish now that they have the full power of our government. Republican tax plans make no mention of closing any loopholes that the rich have been using to become ever-more affluent and powerful.last_img read more

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Talk of the towns

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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BRSG: DC plans to strengthen German system, says WTW

first_imgAt a recent conference the German supervisor BaFin called on companies and unions to get in touch about how to set up the new vehicles and plans.However, Jasper pointed out it will take time for the first plans to be up and running: “We do not think any new vehicles will be set up before autumn 2018 by the social partners.”This is largely because in the last quarter of each year, the so-called Tarifverträge (collective bargaining agreements), are negotiated between social partners of employers and workers’ unions. Only companies having signed on to these agreements will be allowed to set up pure DC plans under the new legal framework.“It would be good if companies would be allowed to introduce these features on an individual basis in a works agreement, even if they are not part of a collective bargaining agreement,” Jasper noted.Similarly, members can only be auto-enrolled into DC pension plans set up as part of a collective bargaining agreement.Jasper said this limitation was “regrettable” but he added it was “very positive that auto-enrolment was mentioned in the law”.According to a survey held by WTW among German employees last year, the vast majority (72%) said they would be content to be enrolled into a pension plan with the possibility to opt out.The BRSG also requires employers to pass on any savings they make on social contributions by paying parts of the wages directly into pension plans.Employers who have outsourced such deferred compensation plans (Entgeltumwandlung) to a Pensionskassse, Pensionsfonds or Direktversicherung vehicle will have to make a 15% contribution. This applies to new plans from 2019 and to all plans from 2022.According to Willis Towers Watson’s Jasper, some companies were already passing on these savings via special arrangements, but he called on all companies to review their pension plans to check for any necessary changes.“We expect this new legal requirement to create a new standard that would put pressure on all employers to pass on savings they make on social contributions when paying into pension plans rather than employees’ current accounts,” he said.This would also mean employers that have set up the Entgeltumwandlung internally, including via book reserves, would have to make additional contributions to these plans. New defined contribution (DC) plans will strengthen funded pensions in Germany if they are widely accepted by employers and workers, according to Willis Towers Watson.Talking to IPE, Thomas Jasper, head of occupational pensions at Willis Towers Watson for Western Europe, said the adoption of changes brought in under the Betriebsrentenstärkungsgesetz (BRSG) could change the country’s occupational pension landscape significantly. The law introducing DC plans will come into effect next year.“If the new pension plans without guarantees get widely accepted, companies will have to set them up via funded vehicles,” Jasper said.Direktzusagen pensions – in which benefits are paid directly from a company’s balance sheet rather than backed by financial assets – will in future only be allowed if employers grant a 0% guarantee.last_img read more

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PUMA Pounces on Rotterdam Offshore Center

first_imgThe Port of Rotterdam Authority and PUMA, a joint venture between Royal Boskalis Westminster NV and Van Oord NV, signed a contract for the construction of the site of the Rotterdam Offshore Center Maasvlakte 2.PUMA, or Projectorganisatie Uitbreiding Maasvlakte, Project Organisation Expansion Maasvlakte, is responsible for the first phase of construction works on the site.The joint venture will officially start rainbowing on the site on 1 August. A total of some 7 million m³ of sand required for this undertaking will be extracted from offshore sites and port basins, the Port Authority said.The 70 ha Offshore Center will be built at Prinses Alexiahaven along Maasvlakte 2’s inland basin, and is scheduled to become operational within two years from the start of construction works. The activities at the Offshore Center will be related to construction, assembly, logistics and heavy lift operations for offshore wind. The center will also cover decommissioning of the oil and gas platforms, as well as the oil and gas market.Rotterdam Offshore Center Maasvlakte 2 is the very first offshore center in Europe, the Port Authority said. The realisation of the center is said to allow the companies to cluster their activities and benefit from each other’s proximity.When fully developed, the center will have 1,600 metres of deepsea quays specially built for offshore requirements.last_img read more

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Happy 1st birthday! Now it’s time to leave the nest

first_imgMercatorNet 17 Sep 2013….Daycare for young children is taken for granted in Sweden. Children are generally between 13 and 18 months old when they start. To put your child in daycare at two years old is universally considered late – a deviation from the norm.….The most outspoken critic of this system, Jonas Himmelstrand, is currently living in exile with his family on a Finnish island because he and his wife also insist on homeschooling their children, which is illegal in Sweden. But that has not stopped him from talking about the flaws in the Swedish system. Earlier this year he was speaking in Britain, where he described how academic performance in Swedish schools has plummeted since the 1980’s from among the best down to below average in, for instance, math. Discipline problems are now also among the worst in Europe. He ascribes this to early daycare because it fosters peer-orientation, which is detrimental to psychological maturation and learning. As a matter of fact, psychological problems among schoolgirls have tripled in the last 30 years. Could there be a connection?http://www.mercatornet.com/family_edge/view/12772last_img read more

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First Day Hike coming to state parks

first_imgBATESVILLE, Ind. — As people across the state are thinking about Christmas Parties and New Year’s Celebrations, the Indiana DNR is planning to kick off 2017 with its First Day Hikes and Horse Rides at Indiana’s State Parks on January 1.The DNR says that First Day Hikes are a healthy way to start 2017 and a chance to get outside, exercise, enjoy nature, and connect with friends.There will be 32 First Day events throughout the state.Brookville Lake, 4 p.m.: Meet at the Mounds State Recreation Area campground shelter house for an easy 0.7-mile hike on the Wildlife Wander Loop Trail. The hike should last about 45 minutes. Hot cocoa and a fire will be available afterward.Brown County State Park, 11 a.m.: Meet in front of Abe Martin Lodge for a “Hills ’n’ Hollers” hike. The 1.5- to 2-mile hike will last about an hour. After the hike, a hot chocolate bar will be available at the lodge.Charlestown State Park, 10 a.m.: Meet at the Trail 3 parking lot for a Rose Island History Hike. At 2.4-miles long, the leisurely hike should last about two-and-a-half hours. Hikers will see the remains of an amusement park and new exhibits interpreting them. Hot cocoa will be provided.Clifty Falls State Park, 2 p.m.: Meet at Lookout Point for a First Day Waterfall Walk. The moderately rugged hike is 1 mile long and should last about an hour. Bring sturdy hiking shoes and a camera.Falls of the Ohio State Park, 1 p.m.: Meet at the interpretive center for a Falls River Greenway Hike. The 3-mile, easy hike will last about two hours as visitors hike to the George Rogers Clark home site on the Ohio River Greenway.Hardy Lake, 1 p.m.: Meet at the main office for a 1.5-mile-long Wildlife in the Winter Hike. The hike is moderately rugged and will last about an hour.McCormick’s Creek State Park, 2 p.m.: Meet at Canyon Inn for a Canyon Hike and Photo Contest. The roughly 3/4-mile hike is easy to moderate. Hikers can bring cameras or smart phones to snap photos for an optional contest. Refreshments will be available at the end of the hike.Monroe Lake: Monroe Lake will host the fourth annual First Day Trail Run/Walk at Fairfax State Recreation Area. Registration/check-in runs from 2:15 to 3:15 p.m. at Bayview Shelter. The run/walk starts at 3:30 p.m. The event is untimed. Participants can choose from a 3.5- to -4.5-mile course or a 1.5- to 2-mile course. Registering in advance costs $15. The advance registration deadline is Dec. 30.Those who register in advance will have access to a post-event hors d’oeuvres buffet at Fourwinds Lakeside Inn. The first 300 people to register in advance will receive a commemorative patch and a $15 gift certificate for the restaurants at the Fourwinds Lakeside Inn.Same-day registration is also $15. More information and online registration is at mag7raceseries.comO’Bannon Woods State Park, 1 p.m.: Meet at the nature center to walk with the park’s oxen, Forest and Gump, and its donkeys, Garth and Gracie. The walk will be on a roadway for about 1 mile. Enjoy refreshments upon return to the nature center. The event is contingent on weather and road conditions.Spring Mill State Park, 10 a.m.: Meet at the Lakeview Activity Center for a two-hour, 2.5-mile hike. Hot chocolate and coffee in the Lakeview Activity Center will be available after the hike, courtesy of Spring Mill Inn.Summit Lake State Park: An indoor activity for kids starts at 11:30 a.m. At noon, hikers should meet at the park office for a “Hike in the Hidden Prairie.” The hike will be 3/4-mile long along a mowed path and will last about an hour. Coffee, hot chocolate and donuts will be available.Versailles State Park, 2 p.m.: Meet at the pool parking lot in front of the mountain bike trailhead for a 4-mile hike. The hike will last about two hours. Sturdy hiking boots, water and hiking sticks are recommended. Well-behaved dogs on leash are welcome.Whitewater Memorial State Park, 11 a.m.: Meet at the Poplar Grove Shelter for a moderate, 2.5-mile hike on the Memorial Loop Trail. The hike will take approximately 90 minutes. Participants can drink hot cocoa around a fire afterward.last_img read more

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Domagala stampedes to IMCA Modified checkers at 45th annual Jamestown special

first_imgTracy Domagala won the Xtreme Motor Sports IMCA Modified main event at Jamestown Speedway’s 45th annual Stampede. (Photo by Cody Papke)JAMESTOWN, N.D. (Oct. 15) – Tracy Domagala won’t just return to Jamestown Speedway next fall to defend his Xtreme Motor Sports IMCA Modified Stampede title.He’ll come back to buy a souvenir sweatshirt … the one with his name listed among the winners of the prestigious event.Domagala earned $2,000 along with a spot on the ballot for the 2017 Fast Shafts All-Star Invitational.“This has to be one of the biggest events in the three-state area,” Domagala said. “The trophy and the money are great but having your name on the sweatshirt for the rest of your life is really special.”Fifty-two IMCA Modified drivers vied at the 45th annual Stampede. Domagala, whose best finish in three starts this season at Jamestown was 11th, started ninth in the main event.“We knew we had a pretty tough row to hoe but we’ve been figuring some stuff out with this new Taylor Chassis,” he said. “I thought if I stuck on the bottom that maybe it would come in. Around lap 15 I got next to the leader (Tyler Hall) and ran with him side-by-side for a few laps.”“After I cleared him, with about 10 laps left, I stayed on the bottom,” Domagala continued. “From where I started I had thought a top five finish would be a good goal. Winning this race is a pretty big deal.”Hall, 15th starting Jason Wolla, Mike Greseth and Mark Dahl rounded out the top five.The Stampede was rescheduled from the final weekend of the point season due to inclement weather. Ryan Schroeder topped the $500 to win race for non-feature qualifiers.Feature results – 1. Tracy Domagala; 2. Tyler Hall; 3. Jason Wolla; 4. Mike Greseth; 5. Mark Dahl; 6. John Corell; 7. Ryan Mikkelson; 8. Josh Eberhardt; 9. Jarrett Carter; 10. Mark Trautner; 11. Dave Shipley; 12. Rich Pavlicek; 13. Marlyn Seidler; 14. John Nord; 15. Tyler Peterson; 16. Andrew Michel; 17. Eric Edwards; 18. Hank Berry; 19. Shawn Nostdahl; 20. Troy Heupel; 21. Marcus Tomlinson; 22. Jordan Huettl; 23. Greg Friestad; 24. Randy Kollman.Non-qualifier feature results – 1. Ryan Schroeder; 2. Travis Olheiser; 3. Dan Aune; 4. Mike Johnson; 5. Wayne Johnson; 6. Bob Banish Jr.; 7. Jordan Zillmer; 8. Quentin Kinzley; 9. Rusty Kollman; 10. Ben Mickelson; 11. Adam Fischer; 12. Kelly Hagel; 13. Dwight Wegner; 14. Kit Baumann; 15. Jerry Martin; 16. Travis Ulmer; 17. Josh Jones; 18. Jeremy Keller; 19. Chad Bush; 20. Myles Tomlinson; 21. Randy Klein; 22. Josh Anderson; 23. Jerry Lamb; 24. Tony Marsh; 25. Chad Hausauer; 26. Allan Fetzer; 27. Trent Grager; 28. Travis Hagen.last_img read more