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Ari Graynor, Stefania LaVie Owen & Justice Smith Set for Yen

first_img Show Closed This production ended its run on March 4, 2017 Ari Graynor(Photo: Tibrina Hobson/Getty Images) View Comments Stage and screen stars Ari Graynor, Stefania LaVie Owen and Justice Smith will join the previously announced Lucas Hedges in the American premiere of Yen. Directed by Trip Cullman and penned by Anna Jordan, the MCC production will begin performances on January 12, 2017 and officially open on January 30 at the Lucille Lortel Theatre. Tickets are now on sale.Graynor has been seen on Broadway in The Little Dog Laughed, Relatively Speaking, The Performers and Brooklyn Boy; screen credits include I’m Dying Up Here and Bad Teacher. Owen is best known for her starring role as Dorrit Bradshaw on The Carrie Diaries; additional credits include Chance, Krampus and The Lovely Bones. Smith currently stars on Netflix’s The Get Down.In Yen, Bobbie (Smith) and Hench (Hedges) are home alone. Days are filled by streaming porn, playing video games, watching the world go by. Their mom (Graynor) rarely visits these days, and it’s chaos when she does. But when animal-loving neighbor Jenny (Owen) takes an interest in their dog Taliban, the boys discover a world far beyond what they know. Yen explores a childhood lived without boundaries.The limited off-Broadway engagement is scheduled to run through February 19, 2017.center_img Yen Related Showslast_img read more

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Broadway Grosses: Sunday in the Park with George Gives the Hudson New Life

first_imgJake Gyllenhaal in ‘Sunday in the Park with George’ at New York City Center(Photo: Stephanie Berger) When making a work of art, first of all you need a good foundation, otherwise it’s risky from the start. Fortunately for the new Broadway revival of Sunday in the Park with George, they’re already off to a solid run. The Pulitzer Prize-winning musical by Stephen Sondheim and James Lapine reopened the historic Hudson Theatre on February 11, and in its first preview performance, the Jake Gyllenhaal and Annaleigh Ashford-led production played to a full capacity and grossed 93.51% of its potential. Meanwhile, another return of a Broadway classic celebrated opening night at the Palace Theatre: Sunset Boulevard. The production, starring Glenn Close, broke $1 million (coming in at $1,142,254). It was the highest-grossing of Andrew Lloyd Webber’s four musicals currently playing, with School of Rock, Cats and The Phantom of the Opera garnering figures in the mid $600,000s. Here’s a look at who was on top—and who was not—for the week ending February 12:FRONTRUNNERS (By Gross)1. Hamilton ($2,903,693)2. The Lion King ($1,553,274)3. Wicked ($1,306,187)4. The Book of Mormon ($1,264,107)5. Aladdin ($1,218,011)UNDERDOGS (By Gross)5. Chicago ($506,158)4. Jitney ($353,719)3. The Glass Menagerie ($312,736)*2. In Transit ($234,518)1. Sunday in the Park with George ($136,384)**FRONTRUNNERS (By Capacity)1. The Book of Mormon (101.71%)2. Hamilton (101.56%)3. Dear Evan Hansen (101.52%)4. Sunday in the Park with George (100.00%)**5. The Lion King (98.93%)UNDERDOGS (By Capacity)5. Paramour (65.49%)***4. School of Rock (64.06%)3. Kinky Boots (61.27%)2. The Phantom of the Opera (60.02%)1. On Your Feet! (54.94%)*Number based on five preview performances**Number based on one preview performance***Number based on seven regular performancesSource: The Broadway League View Commentslast_img read more

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Sunday in the Park’s Jake Gyllenhaal Gave Annaleigh Ashford Breast Pump Funnels

first_imgAnnaleigh Ashford What’s the best part about starring opposite Jake Gyllenhaal in Sunday in the Park with George on Broadway? Sharing a bathroom with Jake Gyllenhaal. OK, fine, that may not be the best part, but for Annaleigh Ashford, it sure is a perk. The Tony winner stopped by Late Night to chat with Seth Meyers about her dressing room situation with her leading man, the ever-so-thoughtful gift of breast pump funnels he got her, his impeccable singing voice and that time she peed on stage. Clearly, it wasn’t a career-ruining blunder. And for all you “Puppet Judy” fans out there, the star demonstrated her surreal Judy Garland tribute for Meyers. Check out the zany interview below, then catch Ashford, Gyllenhaal and company at the Hudson Theatre! Sunday in the Park With George View Commentscenter_img Show Closed This production ended its run on April 23, 2017 Related Showslast_img read more

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Emergency Food.

first_imgLogically, Amy Hopper doesn’t think the arrival of the newcentury is going to affect her family’s food supply. But the motherof two young children isn’t taking any chances.”Every time I go grocery shopping, I buy an extra bagof sugar, an extra bag of flour, a box of powdered milk and agallon of water,” Hopper said. “I don’t think we’llactually have to have it. But we can always use it.”University of Georgia food experts support Hopper’s logic.Storing Extra Food is a Smart Idea”We aren’t telling people to go out and stock their pantriesbecause of Y2K. But we are telling them it’s a smart idea to stockyour pantry for emergencies,” said Elizabeth Andress, anExtension Service food safety specialist with the UGA Collegeof Family and Consumer Sciences. “Every family should haveat least a three-day emergency food supply to fall back on.”Andress said having an emergency food supply cuts down on thestress level in emergencies and natural disasters.”Whether it’s a hurricane, tornado or snow storm, a naturaldisaster could prevent you from running to the grocery store topick up supplies for dinner,” Andress said.”Having an emergency food supply on hand will providepeace of mind for you and your family,” she said, “nomatter what disaster may come your way.”Select the Right Foods for Emergency ConditionsThesize of your emergency food supply depends on the size of yourfamily and home storage area. Stock only nonperishable foods.”Select foods that require no refrigeration, little orno cooking and little or no water,” Andress said. “Chancesare, if you’re in an emergency situation, you aren’t going tohave the luxuries of electricity and running water.”Stock your food supply with ready-to-eat canned meats, fruitsand vegetables. Remember to buy containers that can be used upin one meal or snack, since you will most likely be unable torefrigerate leftovers.Add canned juices and soups and canned or powdered milk. Includebottled water and extra water to mix with the powdered milk anddilute the soups.Supply enough fluids (milk, juice, water, etc.) so each familymember is allotted at least 2 quarts of fluids per day.Your supply should also include staple foods such as sugar,salt and pepper and high-energy foods like peanut butter, jelly,crackers, granola bars and trail mix.Remember the Extras”Don’t forget to throw in some comfort foods, too, likecookies, hard candy, sweetened cereals and instant coffee andtea,” Andress said.And don’t forget your vitamins. Be sure to include vitamin,mineral and protein supplements to assure proper nutrition.When stocking your emergency supply, keep in mind any specialneeds in your family. Have you included special foods for infantsor elderly family members?Don’t forget to include a hand-operated can opener, scissorsand knife for opening canned foods and foods in foil or plasticpouches. The last items in your food supply should be disposableplates, cups and utensils.Replenish Your Supply Yearly”Once you have your food supply together, make a listof dates when food items need to be inspected and possibly rotatedout. Then replace them with newly bought items,” Andresssaid. “Canned foods can last two years. But for best quality,use them within one year.”Powdered milk may be stored 12 to 24 months. Most of the otherfoods in your emergency supply should be used or rotated out withinone year. Over time, replace any food cans which may be rusty,leaky, dented or bulging.Now that your emergency food supply is intact, store it ina cool, dry place. Store dry supplies off the floor in a clean,dry, dark place away from any sources of moisture.(Photo by Sharon Omahen, University of Georgia College ofAgricultural and Environmental Sciences.)last_img read more

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Butterfly Food.

first_imgButterfly Photo Gallery Black Swallowtail Queen Anne’s Lace, Rue Phlox, Lantana, Tithonia Butterfly Forage Attractor Pipevine Swallowtail Dutchmans pipe (Aristolochia) Lantana, Phlox, Buddleia Great Purple Hairstreak Mistletoe (Fruit) Asclepias Tiger Swallowtail Tulip Tree, Cherry, Birch Phlox, Lantana, Tithonia Monarch Milkweed Asclepias, Buddleia, Zinnia Painted Lady Hollyhock Aster, Cosmos, Echinacea Silver Spotted Skipper Robinia (Locust) legumes Lantana, Milkweed, Zinnia Cabbage Butterfly (White) Crucifers, Nasturtiums Verbena, Tithonia Gulf Frittilary Passiflora Lantana, Buddleia (American) Painted Lady Anaphalis Echinacea, Buddleia Spring (blue) Azure Dogwood, Viburnum Clover, Tradescantia Fiery Skipper Crabgrass Lantana, Echinacea Cloudless Sulfur Cassia, Clover, Apple Salvia, Verbena, Buddleia Crescentspot (Pearl) Aster Rudbeckia, Echinacea Morning Cloak Willow, Elm, Hackberry (Fruit) Zinnias Spicebush Swallowtail Sassafras, Persea, Lindera Phlox, Lantana, Tithonia Harvester Witchhazel (larvae eat aphids) Echinacea Questionmark Elm, Nettles, Hackberry (Fruit) (Sap) Orange Sulfur White Clover, Alfalfa Clover, Verbena Comma Elm, Nettles, Hops (Fruit) (Sap) Zebra Swallowtail Paw Paw Blueberry, Buddleia Dogface Butterfly Clovers Eupatorium, Clover, Verbena Viceroy Willow, Apple, Plums Echinacea, Zinnias Giant Swallowtail Citrus (Orange) Buddleia, Tithonia, Orange More on Butterfly Garden Plan a Butterfly Garden Best Butterfly Plants Red Spotted Purple Willow, Cherry Apple, Buddleia Common Sulfur Clover, Alfalfa, Vetch Clover, Bergena Ohio Buckeye Snapdragon, Plantain Coreopsis, Echinacea, Aster Place for Water, Rest Attracting Hummingbirds Gray Hairstreak (Common) Hibiscus, Beans, Clover, Oak Hibiscus, Asclepiaslast_img read more

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Worms Work Better.

first_imgChemicals are routinely tested on lab mice before they’re placedon the market. A new technique used in a University of Georgialab may reduce the number of mice needed for testing.Phil Williams, an environmental health scientist with the UGACollege of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, uses microscopicworms called nematodes to determine the toxicity of chemicals.Worms Cost Less and Work Better”When new chemicals are developed, at some point, animaltesting is required,” Williams said. Using animals in testingrequires proper facilities and a lot of money.”Plus, many people don’t like mice, or any animals withfur, being used for these tests,” he saidThe nematode Williams uses, Caenorhabditis, is foundnaturally in the soil. Its nervous system functions much likethat of humans. “It can’t show everything in relation tohumans, but there’s a lot we can learn from it,” Williamssaid.Mice and rats, most commonly used for laboratory testing, aren’talways the best choices. “The closer biologically an animalis to a human, the more likely we can predict human reactions,”he said.Won’t Replace Higher Animals Williams is finding nematodes very effective in early stagesof toxicity testing. But he doesn’t expect them to replace otheranimals entirely.”At some point, higher animals are always going to haveto be used,” he said. “There are some things you justcan’t learn without using higher animals.Nematodes’ effectiveness in testing for toxicity could reducethe number of new chemicals tested.”A company could make a thousand new chemicals and couldnever afford to screen them all using higher animals,” hesaid. “Using the nematode, we can easily and quickly determinewhich new chemicals to continue testing.”For chemical testing, nematodes are still in the developmentstages. But on the environmental side, they’re much closer tobeing used outside the lab.Quicker Soil Tests In Less Soil”Sinceit’s a soil organism, I’ve use it to predict environmental affectsof chemical exposures,” Williams said. He also uses themwhen testing soil samples for toxicity.Earthworms are used for soil tests, too, but they require alarger soil sampling, and results take up to 14 days. The nematodetest uses just 3 grams of soil and gives results in 24 hours.”Earthworms require about 400 grams of soil for testing,”Williams said. “When you’re working with hazardous soil,you’d much rather work with just 3 grams.”Analytical soil tests are so advanced they can detect minuteamounts of chemicals on a site. But detection isn’t enough.”The biological effects to humans and animals aren’t answeredby these tests,” he said. “You have to use organismsto see what the biological effect will be.”In December, the American Society for Testing Materials plansto vote on adopting the use of nematodes for soil testing.Used For Food Science Testing TooNematodes may have other uses, too. Williams is working withUGA food scientists to detect food-borne pathogens. Nematodesappear to have great potential in detecting clostridium botulinum,the organism that causes botulism.”Botulism affects the nervous system, which makes thenematode a perfect testing specimen,” he said.Williams also uses nematodes to test new medical imaging agentsfor a pharmaceutical company. “These agents are taken internallyfor medical diagnostics and then traced through the body,”he said. “The company can chemically make these productsfairly easily, but screening and approval is a long process.”Nematodes can greatly streamline the screening.In the future, Williams sees nematodes greatly reducing thenumber of mice and rats used in laboratory testing.”You could release a chemical into the environment for20 to 30 years and then look back and see what the effects were,but that’s not ethical,” Williams said. “You could exposehumans to the chemicals, but we would never do that. So we haveto use animal models to try to help us predict effects.”last_img read more

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Safer shellfish

first_imgResearching parasites in foodAt UGA, Ortega’s research focuses on detecting parasites in food products and environmental samples that cause diseases in humans and animals. As part of these efforts, she is working to develop new detection methods.”I’m also studying the risk factors associated with parasitic foodborne transmission,” she said. “Our Center’s goal is to help the industry develop safer produce and food products and provide the industry with testing, development and evaluation methods to inactivate parasites on our food.”In 1993, Ortega was part of a team of scientists that first identified Cyclospora, a parasite linked to outbreaks in raspberries, basil and lettuce.The parasite was falsely linked to strawberries in a 1995 Texas outbreak. “The strawberries were blamed,” Ortega said, “and strawberry growers lost $20 million in one week. $500,000 USDA grantOrtega has been awarded a $500,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture. She will conduct the three-year project along with UGA food scientist Yao-Wen Huang and researchers from the USDA and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.”First we will go to the areas where shellfish are normally harvested,” she said, “along the Georgia coast, the Gulf of Mexico and the East Coast. Then we will examine the specimens for the presence of parasites. We will also be evaluating methods to inactivate parasites in shellfish.”Foodborne illnesses linked to parasites can take up to a week to strike, Ortega said. Illnesses caused by foodborne pathogens result in symptoms much sooner. By Sharon OmahenUniversity of GeorgiaUniversity of Georgia parasitologist Ynes Ortega will lead a research team looking into whether parasites that are filtered from the water into oysters and other shellfish are infectious to humans.”This is an unknown area, and that’s why this research is so crucial,” said Ortega, a scientist with the UGA Center for Food Safety in Griffin, Ga. “We need to know if this is an area of concern for the public’s health.”last_img read more

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Freeze risk

first_imgBy David Emory StooksburyUniversity ofGeorgiaAthens, Ga. — Compared to recentwinters, the probability of a damaging freeze is higher in early2004 across most of Georgia. This higher freeze risk is becauseof current and expected atmospheric-oceanic patterns.Atmospheric-oceanic patterns have a major influence on the typeof winter we have in the Southeast. The best known large-scaleatmospheric-oceanic pattern is El Nino. Under the El Ninopattern, much of Georgia has a wetter-than-normal winter.The opposite pattern is called La Nina. During a La Nina winter,much of the Southeast is drier than normal.Both El Nino and La Nina patterns tend to keep extremely cold airfrom making it from Canada into the deep South. Thus, damagingfreezes are less likely during El Nino and La Nina winters.No protectionThis winter, though, the atmospheric-oceanic system is in theneutral pattern. It’s neither El Nino nor La Nina. During winterswith the neutral pattern, extremely cold air from Canada isusually able to invade the Southeast.This extremely cold air can cause significant freeze-relateddamage. Between periods of very cold air, the Southeast shouldhave periods of relatively warm air.Across extremely south and coastal Georgia, the likelihood oftemperatures below 20 degrees this winter is at least one andhalf times greater than we would expect during an El Nino or LaNina winter.Across much of Georgia, the probability of temperatures below 14degrees is at least one and half times greater than we wouldexpect during an El Nino on La Nina winter. Temperatures around14 and below can cause extreme damage to Georgia winter crops,especially onions.Maps and detailed expectations concerning the extreme freezeprobabilities may be found on the Web at www.coaps.fsu.edu/climate_center/frz04.html.The extreme freeze probability analysis and maps were produced bythe Southeast Climate Consortium. The consortium is an outreachand research cooperative between the University of Georgia,Florida State University, University of Florida, University ofMiami and the University of Alabama at Huntsville.(David Emory Stooksbury is the State Climatologist of Georgia anda professor of engineering and atmospheric sciences in theUniversity of Georgia College of Agricultural and EnvironmentalSciences.)last_img read more

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Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

first_imgUnmanned aerial vehicles could soon be a soaring success for Georgia farmers.University of Georgia cotton and peanut researchers in Tifton are excited about the prospect.“You’ve really got to be able to keep up with the technology to stay in business,” said Glen Harris, a UGA Cooperative Extension soil scientist who studies cotton,peanuts and other crops. “We have less growers running more acres. They’re really utilizing all kinds of technology to keep up.”The next stage in technological advancement may lie with unmanned vehicles. Unmanned aerial helicopters used to take images of cotton and peanut research were featured at the Sunbelt Expo grounds in Moultrie on Aug. 20. Harris and fellow UGA peanut team members John Beasley and Scott Tubbs attended to discuss the possible use of unmanned aerial vehicles in agriculture. Although this technology will not be available for commercial use until 2015, the idea of taking aerial photographs of various research plots is an exciting proposition for Harris. “It’s amazing how much in the last 20 years technology has changed. A lot of people think we’re farming like we did 100 years ago. That’s far from the truth,” Harris said. “You think about having this technology to fly over your cotton field to pick up early nitrogen deficiency and low potassium deficiency, and even if we can’t tell the difference between the two, we can go out there and figure out which one it is. The earlier you can detect it, the better chance you have of fixing it.”Harris said the technology would have been especially helpful in diagnosing problems in this year’s cotton crop. “We had a lot of cotton this year that, by the time we realized what (problems) were going on, it was probably too late to fix,” he said. Unmanned aerial vehicles would allow farmers to see early images of their crops and detect any stand issues that might arise early in the planting season. Producers could also look at issues like inoculant failure or why a section of a field might look more yellow than others. If a picture shows additional green images between rows, the farmer can determine whether it’s a sign of weed problems, which can be addressed early in the planting season.When Beasley became a scientist in 1985, he says “precision agriculture” wasn’t even a concept. “These technologies are amazing. Take this imagery with this ability for unmanned flight, combined together, that’s what I think is exciting,” Beasley said.Unmanned aerial vehicles would allow farmers to detect diseases and identify low stand counts at a much quicker rate. The vehicles are a much more precise way to discover issues with a crop, Harris said.“You can’t cover every foot of (a field) walking through it,” Harris said. “I’ve worked cotton 20 years, but I probably could miss something out there without (the overhead camera).”Harris said he can see corn farmers benefiting from an overhead view, too. “Once the corn gets over your head, it’s really hard to see. We can pick up late fungicide problems that are really hard to pick up from the ground once the corn gets tall. It just gives you a lot better perspective,” he said.The project has been researched at the Sunbelt Expo grounds in Moultrie this year, with five acres devoted to peanuts and cotton, each.last_img read more

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Sod Survey

first_imgIf your spring landscape plans include installing sodded turfgrass, you can expect to pay more this year, according to a University of Georgia and Georgia Urban Ag Council survey.Thirty-five Georgia sod producers participated in the 2013 telephone survey. The growers represented farms ranging from less than 300 acres to more than 900 acres, but the majority of the survey participants manage less than 300 acres.Inventory and prices“The purpose of the annual survey is the determine inventory levels and projected price changes,” said Clint Waltz, turfgrass specialist with UGA Extension. “We found that delivered prices for the bermudagrass, centipedegrass and St. Augustine are expected to increase by more than 13 percent. Bermudagrass and centipedegrass prices should be at historic levels.”Waltz attributes the price increase to unfavorable environmental conditions during the regrowth period this past summer and fall sod sales. Both large and small scale sod producers were affected by the lack of sunlight during the 2013 growing season and were unable to regrow enough grass to meet expected demands, Waltz said.“Several growers have told me that strong fall sales have dropped their inventories of warm-season grasses down to levels lower than they commonly experience in the first five months of the year,” he said. Fifty-two percent of the bermudagrass growers rated their fall inventory as adequate to excellent. But nearly half the bermudagrass growers (48 percent) surveyed projected having less than adequate supplies this spring. “The supply of bermudagrass is low, regardless of the farm size,” Waltz said.The number of growers producing zoysiagrass grew with 60 percent of those surveyed growing the grass. Forty-eight percent of these growers project a shortage this year.Of the producers surveyed, 57 percent grow centipedegrass. Thirty-five percent of these anticipate a 2014 inventory shortage. Sixty percent of the St. Augustinegrass growers reported adequate supplies. All tall fescue producers reported an adequate inventory, which continues a 10-year trend. Eighty-six percent of the tall fescue growers surveyed reported excellent to adequate inventories. Prices up for all varietiesThe delivered price is expected to increase for all grasses in the survey. A truckload of bermudagrass delivered to the Atlanta area, or within 100 miles of the farm, is expected to rise 14 percent. The delivered price of zoysiagrass is expected to rise 1.4 percent to 35.8 cents per square foot. “Considering expected price increases for 2014 and consumer demand, spring and summer prices for zoysiagrass are likely to exceed these survey prices,” Waltz said.The price of delivered centipedegrass is also expected to rise to an average of 23.5 cents. “Interestingly, it has taken seven years for centipedegrass to match or exceed its 2007 price (21.3 cents),” Waltz said.Tall fescue’s delivered price is expected to rise 1.7 percent to an average of 24 cents per square foot. The average price should fall between 20 and 30 cents.St. Augustine’s delivered price should be up by 17.3 percent to an average of 34.6 cents per square foot.“This year’s gain brings St. Augustinegrass back in line with 2006 and 2007 prices,” Waltz said. “Since it was added to the survey in 2005, St. Augustinegrass prices have varied wildly compared to other species. Last year there was a 13 percent decrease from the previous year, and this year the prices are expected to rise 17 percent.”You get what you pay forBuyers who prefer certified sod should expect to pay an additional 2 to 3 cents per square foot. This year marks a seven-year price increase for certified grass. “This translates to between $10 and $15 extra on a 500 square foot pallet,” Waltz said. “Consumers should consider this a nominal cost to insure varietal purity of a perennial species.”The survey revealed that most Georgia-grown sod is sold to landscape contractors (39 percent) with homeowners following as the second largest purchasers (14 percent). The remainder of the supply is bought for sports/athletic fields, golf courses, garden centers, brokers, developers and landscape designers.None of the sod growers surveyed expect to reduce the number of acres they produce in 2014. Eighteen of the 35 producers plan to add more acres this year. “These additional acres would not affect the market until 2015 or 2016,” Waltz said.The UGA Farm Gate Value Report estimated the 2012 farm gate value of Georgia turfgrass at $83.7 million and reported 21,728 acres devoted to turfgrass. The top five turfgrass producing counties in Georgia are Macon, Cook, Bulloch, Bartow and Sumter. To view the complete survey, go to www.GeorgiaTurf.com.last_img read more