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Gavin Lee, Chris McCarrell & More Are New Stars of B’way’s Les Miz

first_imgLook out for new feisty innkeepers, hopeless romantics, botched haircut victims and more! Beginning March 3, the Broadway revival of Les Miserables will welcome five new leads at the Imperial Theatre: Tony and Olivier Award nominee Gavin Lee as Thenardier, current ensemble member Chris McCarrell as Marius, Wallace Smith as Enjolras, Erika Henningsen as Fantine, Brennyn Lark as Eponine and Rachel Izen as Madame Thenardier. They will take over for Cliff Saunders, Andy Mientus, Kyle Scatliffe, Caissie Levy, Eponine understudy Brittney Johnson and Keala Settle respectively. Show Closed This production ended its run on Sept. 4, 2016 Related Shows Based on the classic novel by Victor Hugo, Les Miserables is written by Alain Boublil and Claude-Michel Schonberg, with lyrics by Herbert Kretzmer, original French text by Boublil and Jean-Marc Natel, an original adaptation by Trevor Nunn and John Caird, and additional material by James Fenton. The musical premiered on Broadway in 1987 and was revived previously in 2006. Lee received Tony and Olivier nods for his performance as Bert in Mary Poppins; he also appeared in the West End in Contact, Oklahoma!, Crazy For You and Me & My Girl. McCarrell was recently seen on screen as a Lost Boy in Peter Pan Live!; Les Miz marks his Broadway debut. Smith’s Broadway credits include Rocky, Godspell, American Idiot, The Lion King, Hair and Ragtime. Les Miz will mark the Broadway debuts for both Hennigsen and Lark. Izen returns to the Great White Way after appearing in Mary Poppins. She was seen on the London stage in Thoroughly Modern Millie, Lautrec and Annie.center_img Tony nominee Ramin Karimloo will continue in the role of Jean Valjean through the summer. The current cast also includes Tony nominee Will Swenson as Javert and Samantha Hill as Cosette. The role of Eponine is currently played by Erin Clemons, who steps in temporarily following Tony winner Nikki M. James’ departure earlier this month. Johnson begins performances as Eponine on February 10. Les Miserables View Commentslast_img read more

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Outdoor Updates: Cherokee Indians can once again harvest sochan + Poachers face death penalty

first_imgWildlife poachers in Kenya could soon face the death penalty Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians can once again harvest sochan in Great Smoky Mountains National Park A historic signing of an agreement at the Oconaluftee Visitor Center in Great Smoky Mountains National Park returns the right for the Cherokee to pick sochan on their ancestral lands inside of the park, as they had done for centuries. Sochan is a bitter spring green that has historically been a part of the Cherokee diet and culture but picking plants inside of a national park is illegal. In 2016, a new plant gathering rule relaxed the ban to allow for enrolled members of Indian tribes to petition to harvest plants for tribal purposes. The park has found no significant impact from the harvesting and will now allow a permit-based system of sochan collection in certain areas of the park. Up to 36 Eastern Band enrolled members each year will receive a permit, which they must carry with them while gathering sochan in official collection bags approved by the park. The sochan gathering season is March- May 31. Mountain Valley Pipeline developers sue two North Carolina landowners who are refusing access to their landcenter_img Kenya’s tourism and wildlife minister, Najib Balala, has reportedly announced that poachers will face the death penalty, promising to fast track the measure into law. Balala said that the current wildlife poaching deterrents, which include life sentences or a fine of $200,000 USD, are not sufficient. Kenya is home to lions, black rhinos, ostriches, hippos, buffalos, giraffe and zebra and many other treasured species. Last year, 69 elephants and 9 rhinos were killed. Kenya’s population of rhinos is under 1,000. Earlier this month, two black rhinos and a calf were poached at Meru National Park. The ivory tusks of elephants are sold in the global east as trinkets. Rhino horns are believed to have medicinal properties even though they are made of the same substance as human fingernails. Mountain Valley Pipeline is suing two landowners in Alamance County, NC who are denying company representatives access to their land. Pipeline representatives are requesting an injunction forcing the property owners to give them access. One of the landowners owns 50 acres of land, the other 11 acres. The company says it has sent dozens of letters to the landowners and has the power of eminent domain, but that the landowners have refused access to their property. Since it’s beginning, the pipeline has been controversial. In Virginia, the pipeline has been cited for violating environmental regulations over 300 times. Opponents of the pipeline say it will be a health and environmental hazard and that the pipeline potentially abuses property rights. A hearing of the lawsuit will take place on April 1.last_img read more

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August 1, 2004 Letters

first_img Gay Adoptions August 1, 2004 Regular News Let me preface this criticism by noting that the care of children should be foremost among the pressing concerns for any state. This requires an open and balanced debate on what constitutes the best policy for handling child welfare issues. It is with that need for a balanced approach in mind that I sat stunned after reading the July 15 article on the Family Law Section having voted to support gay adoptions.I have rarely encountered a more biased, politically correct valentine of an article. Regardless of whether one supports or opposes the ban on gay adoption, how can there be a balanced perspective on the issue when a supposedly objective article in the News clearly presents only one side of the debate — and in the most glowing and uncritical phraseology? While various sources were quoted throughout the article supporting gay adoption, such as an ACLU attorney, there was no reference to any opposition on lifting the ban. Moreover, there was no effort to depict grounds which reasonable people may have for supporting continuation of the ban. Does the reporter automatically presume that it’s an impossibility for reasonable people of goodwill to differ on this issue?If a genuine policy debate is to be promulgated by the News on any topic, then the publication should at minimum attempt to adopt an objective journalistic standard. Would it be too much to ask for reporters to seek additional sources of perhaps slightly differing opinion? Or to undertake basic investigation on major policy disputes? Mitchell A. Meyers Raleigh, NCGrievance Survey This is in response to the June 15 News story headlined “Commission gets grievance survey.”I am now winding up my third and final year as a public member of a grievance committee in the 13th Judicial Circuit. I agreed to serve on the committee because I was hopeful some of my prejudices about attorneys, accumulated over 35 years as a CPA in public practice, might be eased.During my service I have been impressed with the dedication and diligence of my committee, and am very satisfied we have fulfilled expectations a reasonable and informed public should accept. I responded to the survey myself, and contributed to the 97 percent approval rating returned by grievance committee members.I am, however, alarmed by the 14 percent satisfaction rating from complainants, which suggests, at least to this public member, that somehow the public is not convinced the grievance process really works and tends to believe “it is only a conspiracy by the lawyers to protect their own.” Further, I understand this circuit, alone, needs seven grievance committees, each with approximately the same caseload, to address the volume of public grievances.Unfair and unreasonable though public expectations may be, the gap between the admirable efforts of the grievance committee process and public perception of the legal profession, and its miscreants in particular, is damning, and a ticking time bomb at the very heart of the central mechanism of a stable society.It must be acknowledged some of the complaints our committee has considered had no merit, some were rooted in a client’s disappointment in the results of a meritless case, or perhaps personality conflicts, et al. However, the public perception, as evidenced in the 14 percent satisfaction rating, seems to be much different and suggests that perhaps some of the $10 million spent each year on the process needs to be directed to satisfying the public the process is working, and effectively so.I hope the survey will help the Bar’s Special Commission on Lawyer Regulation to narrow the gap between public satisfaction and the dedicated, diligent efforts of the various committees to render sound and equitable decisions. Richard D. Flemings LutzVirgil Hawkinscenter_img According to a letter in the June 15 News, “[a]s late as 1957, the Florida Supreme Court, by a 5-2 decision, ruled it would not order the University of Florida Law School to admit a qualified black man, Virgil Hawkins, even though the U.S. Supreme Court had ordered it to do so.” Unfortunately, the writer does not provide us with a citation to the alleged order from the U.S. Supreme Court.The Hawkins case made five appearances in the U.S. Supreme Court. On November 13, 1951, Mr. Hawkins’ “[p]etition for writ of certiorari to the Supreme Court of Florida [was] denied for want of a final judgment.” 342 U.S. 877.On May 24, 1954, “the case [was] remanded for consideration in light of the Segregation Cases decided May 17, 1954.” 347 U.S. 971. This is not a direct order to admit Mr. Hawkins. As ordered, the Florida Supreme Court proceeded to “consider” the matter. 83 So. 2d 20.On March 12, 1956, the U.S. Supreme Court acknowledged that its 1954 order cited the wrong case. The Segregation Cases, involving elementary school children, had no application to Mr. Hawkins, who was seeking admission to a law school. Mr. Hawkins’ case was governed by Sweatt v. Painter, 339 U.S. 629, Sipuel v. Board of Regents, 332 U.S. 631, and McLaurin v. Oklahoma State Regents, 339 U.S. 637, all of which predated the Brown decision. The U.S. Supreme Court declared that Mr. Hawkins “is entitled to prompt admission under the rules and regulations applicable to other qualified candidates.” This is not necessarily a direct order to admit Mr. Hawkins. The order is capable of being construed as merely a direction to consider his application for admission under the rules and regulations that apply to every other applicant. The Florida Supreme Court gave it the latter interpretation. 93 So. 2d 354.The U.S. Supreme Court’s 1956 order is poorly written for another reason. The first sentence is “[t]he petition for certiorari is denied.” Further along, the U.S. Supreme Court states that “[t]he petition for writ of certiorari is granted.” The last words of the 1956 order are “Certiorari denied.”The State of Florida moved for rehearing, which the U.S. Supreme Court denied without comment on April 23, 1956. 351 U.S. 915. Not surprisingly, the Florida Supreme Court made the most of the confusing 1956 opinion. 93 So. 2d 354.On October 14, 1957, the case made its fifth and final appearance in the U.S. Supreme Court. Mr. Hawkins’ “[p]etition for writ of certiorari to the Supreme Court of Florida [was] denied without prejudice to the petitioner seeking relief in an appropriate United States District Court.” 355 U.S. 839.In my view, this inept performance by the U.S. Supreme Court, and its failure to deal with the Florida Supreme Court in a forthright and peremptory manner, is at least equally responsible for the injustice that was perpetrated on Mr. Hawkins, and accordingly, the U.S. Supreme Court must bear at least an equal portion of the blame. John Paul Parks Phoenix August 1, 2004 Letterslast_img read more

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Bill would enhance federal regulators’ cybersecurity programs

first_img continue reading » Protecting Americans’ financial and other personal information no matter what entity possesses it is of utmost importance to credit unions, CUNA wrote to House Financial Services Committee leadership Tuesday. The committee conducted a markup of several bill starting Tuesday, including the CUNA-supported Cybersecurity and Financial System Resilience Act (H.R. 4458).“America’s credit unions support efforts to ensure that the entire financial services sector has proper cyber safeguards in place and this effort should extend to the sectors’ regulators,” the letter reads. “H.R. 4458 would require the sectors’ regulators to each issue an annual report to Congress describing measures the respective agency has taken to strengthen cybersecurity with respect to its functions as a regulator, including the supervision and regulation of financial institutions and, where applicable, third-party service providers.”The Federal Information Security Modernization Act (FISMA) requires regulators to develop, document and implement an agency-wide program to provide information security for systems that support the operations and assets of the agency. ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Forced to choose between family members, Spencer mother works to expand son’s high school graduation ceremony

first_imgThis move falls in line with current State of New York restrictions limiting in-person graduation ceremonies to 150 people total. “There is no way to make that decision for us, I mean it’s an impossibility,” said Devlen. Devlen says this year, however, due to the coronavirus, the school’s graduation ceremony is split in two, and each child is only allowed three people in attendance. Tammy Devlen is a mother of three, with her middle child Charles expected to graduate from Spencer Van-Etten High School at the end of the week. The Devlen family, however, is a family of five, leaving them to decide which family member won’t be able to attend. Devlen has been working to voice her concerns to local government and Governor Andrew Cuomo’s office, in hopes of a change. “Please consider being what I would consider fair… just to allow families to be together, families are so important and to be able to spend such a precious moment together is invaluable.” 12 News reached out to the governor’s office about these concerns, but has not heard back. It’s a situation she says isn’t fair, and should be expanded, especially as places like retail stores and others are allowed so many people. SPENCER (WBNG) — A local mother is working to modify current high school graduation ceremony restrictions that have forced her family to choose which family members can attend her son’s big day. The graduation ceremonies for Spencer Van-Etten High School is set for Friday, June 26 and Saturday June 27.last_img read more

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Study refines view of H5N1 virus’s binding preferences

first_imgJan 14, 2008 (CIDRAP News) – A research report published last week says that the factors governing whether H5N1 avian influenza viruses can invade human cells are more complex than previously thought and have to do with the particular shape of the cell-surface sugar molecules to which viruses attach.The conventional wisdom has been that avian flu viruses, including H5N1, prefer to attach to receptor molecules known as alpha 2-3 glycans, whereas human flu viruses, such as H1N1 and H3N2, prefer to bind to receptors called alpha 2-6. The terms refer to the nature of the link between sialic acid, which forms the tip of the receptor molecule, and galactose, an adjoining sugar unit.Alpha 2-6 glycans are said to be abundant in the human upper respiratory tract. The accepted view has been that a change in the H5N1 virus’s binding preference from alpha 2-3 to alpha 2-6 would be a key step toward its transformation into a human pandemic strain.But the new study, published in Nature Biotechnology, suggests that the difference in binding preference between human and avian flu viruses is more complicated than just alpha 2-6 versus alpha 2-3. Rather, it is an affinity for a particular topology, or shape, of alpha 2-6 glycan receptor that characterizes human flu viruses, says the report, written by a team from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.Why shape mattersSpecifically, the researchers report that human flu viruses prefer long alpha 2-6 receptors that occupy an umbrella-shaped space, as opposed to those, including alpha 2-3 and some alpha 2-6 receptors, that occupy a cone-shaped space.”The efficient human adaptation of these viruses is . . . correlated with HA binding to sialylated glycans of a characteristic umbrella-like topology, going beyond the specific alpha 2-3 or alpha 2-6 linkage,” write the researchers, led by Aarthi Chandrasekaran of MIT. They say their findings will improve scientists’ ability to monitor the evolution of human adaptation of avian flu viruses.The authors used a combination of several techniques to gather and interpret their data. First, they used a staining technique and mass spectrometry on sections of human tracheal epithelial tissue to examine the distribution of alpha 2-6 glycans in the tissues. The results showed that these receptors were predominant in the upper respiratory tract lining and that they showed “substantial diversity” in length and composition.Data gathered from the first analysis were then used to determine the “conformational features” of the alpha 2-3 and alpha 2-6 glycans. The analysis led to the conclusion that alpha 2-3 and short alpha 2-6 receptors occupy a cone-shaped space, whereas the umbrella shape is unique to alpha 2-6 glycans and is typically assumed by longer versions of these molecules.Further, in part by using existing data on the structure of hemagglutinin (HA) in different flu viruses—the viral surface protein that links up with host cell receptors—the authors determined that the HAs in human flu viruses “have mutated from their presumed avian counterparts to gain additional contacts with alpha 2-6 in the umbrella-like topology.”The researchers sought further evidence in the extensive existing data from studies of glycan arrays, in which many different glycans are laid out on slides and then exposed to HAs from different flu viruses to see which ones bind to which glycans. Seeking correlations between the features of different glycans and the various HAs, the authors found more evidence that H5N1 HAs prefer to bind to alpha 2-3 and short alpha 2-6 glycans but not to long alpha 2-6 glycans.Finally, the scientists treated preserved sections of human tracheobronchial tissue with different concentrations of HAs from H1 and H3 human flu viruses and observed the resulting binding patterns. This work further demonstrated the “high-affinity binding” between these HAs and the long alpha 2-6 glycans. The researchers also found that two H5N1 viruses, used in high concentrations, showed some affinity for alpha 2-6 gylcans, but this was minimal compared with their affinity for alpha 2-3 glycans.”Taken together, the above findings show that the human-adapted HAs bind specifically to the long alpha 2-6 [glycans] (in the umbrella-like topology), which are predominantly expressed in the human upper respiratory tract,” the researchers state.They write that other flu virus genes may play a role in H5N1 transmission, but that mutations permitting the virus to bind to long alpha 2-6 receptors will be a necessary condition for it to fully adapt to humans.The authors recommend the use of glycan arrays containing long alpha 2-6 units to monitor the evolution and human adaptation of influenza A viruses. They call for the development of arrays to permit rapid dose-dependent analyses of HA binding patterns.Caveats citedDr. John Nicholls, an associate professor in the pathology department of Hong Kong University who has done research on how human and avian flu viruses bind to host cells, said the study sheds important light on how avian viruses may adapt to humans, but he also added some caveats.”This study was what was needed to put together what type of sialic acids the influenza viruses bind to and what was really available for binding within the respiratory tract,” Nicholls told CIDRAP News via e-mail. “As a note of caution, the analysis of what glycans are present in the respiratory tract has been done on cells grown in culture . . . and the question arises to what extent these represent normal human adult and paediatric trachea and bronchi, so clearly we need to move from this in vitro model to the in vivo setting.”He added that efficient human-to-human transmission of viruses may depend on viral replication not only in the bronchi, but also in the nasopharynx. Studies of H5N1-infected patients in Vietnam have shown that replication does occur in the nasopharynx, he said.In addition, Nicholls said, “It is not just binding that is a requirement for human adaptation (and more importantly what determines human to human transmission), but also, as the authors mention, factors such as neuraminidase and other viral gene products.” For example, studies by Kawaoka and colleagues have shown that changes in the PB2 gene allow the virus to replicate at different temperatures in the respiratory tract.”However,” Nicholls concluded, “the importance of this article is that it does shed more light on the finer details of this first step in viral adaptation to humans—binding. Importantly, the simple alpha 2-3 versus alpha 2-6 paradigm as a determinant of host specificity of influenza viruses appears to be a great over-simplification.”Chandrasekaran A, Srinivasan A, Raman R, et al. Glycan topology determines human adaptation of avian H5N1 virus hemagglutinin. Nature Biotech 2008 (advance online publication) [Abstract]last_img read more

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European Parliament calls for comment on financial reporting standards

first_imgThe deadline for comments is 5 February. Sven Giegold, the Green Party’s spokesman on economic affairs in the European Parliament, has issued a public call for comments on a draft Economic and Monetary Affairs Committee (ECON) report into International Financial Reporting Standards.Giegold said: “The initiative report of the European Parliament is a welcome occasion to hint to major problems and to make proposals for corrections.”The ECON committee released a draft of its report dealing with the so-called IAS Regulation on 12 January (see related story).Among its proposals is a call for the European Commission to examine whether the European Securities and Markets Authority has sufficient powers to fulfil its remit.last_img

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Investors must guard against pay inflation at UK firms, report warns

first_imgOther recommendations were for company boards as a whole to be “appropriately engaged” with any remuneration policy drawn up by committees, while allowing committees greater leeway to tailor pay packages, and for committees to guard against industry-wide benchmarking, which would drive up pay unnecessarily.“A small number of consultees highlighted recent cases of remuneration consultants providing information to executive directors, to show that the directors were paid ‘behind the median’,” the report noted.It added that such practices, which it deemed a violation of existing codes of conduct on pay, should be addressed by remuneration committees.The Financial Reporting Council, the UK regulator responsible for the Stewardship Code, welcomed the proposals and emphasised the importance of linking a firm’s culture and values to any proposed pay package.It warned, however, that while the UK largely had a strong reputation for good corporate governance, it was vital to guard against confidence “being tarnished by the actions of those companies doing too little” on remuneration.The Investment Association, the industry group for UK asset managers, said recent comments by Theresa May, the new UK prime minister, showed investors and companies needed to work together to tackle pay.Its director of corporate governance and engagement, Andrew Ninian, added: “We will now look to amend our Principles of Remuneration so the asset managers that look after the financial interests of millions of savers and investors can play their part in delivering the change that is sorely needed.” Companies must guard against using industry benchmarks to justify executive pay increases, a sweeping report on remuneration at UK-listed firms has argued.The independent executive remuneration working group, chaired by the chief executive of Legal & General Nigel Wilson, argued its recommendations would help simplify pay structures.Wilson said it was time to “restore public confidence” in pay, with one of the report’s recommendations to ensure that members of remuneration committees sit on the committee for at least a year before being asked to chair them.“Our report shows shareholders, boards and executives agree that the current approach is not working and want constructive collaboration to get it right,” Wilson said.last_img read more

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Ben Carson Defends Biblical Definition of Marriage

first_imgThe Blaze 20 June 2014Retired pediatric neurosurgeon Ben Carson has freely shared his theological views since his bold 2013 National Prayer Breakfast speech catapulted him onto the national stage — and in a recent interview he affirmed his support for the biblical definition of marriage, encouraging Christians to stand up against “intolerance.”When asked how Christians can “show God’s love to the gay community without compromising God’s word,” Carson, an outspoken Christian, told Charisma News that he believes consenting adults should be able to do whatever they want, but that the definition of marriage shouldn’t change.“If they want to have [a] legal relationship so that they can have visitation rights and property transfer, I don’t have a problem with that,” he said. “What I do have a problem with is changing the definition of marriage. This is established by human history of thousands of years.”Carson went on to note that, in the Bible, God compares marriage to the relationship that the Almighty has with the church, arguing that the definition of matrimony is extremely important and shouldn’t be amended so lightly.“They can call whatever they’re doing whatever they want to call it, but they don’t know if you change it for all of society. If you change it for one group, you have to change it for all groups,” he continued. “I’ve explained that to people. We have to be willing to stand up and say that, not just capitulate.”http://www.theblaze.com/stories/2014/06/20/they-are-being-totally-intolerant-ben-carson-defends-biblical-definition-of-marriage/last_img read more

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Argonauts Clinch GSC East #2 Seed in Sunday Sweep

first_img Share Argonauts Clinch GSC East #2 Seed in Sunday Sweep April 29, 2007Box Score HUNTSVILLE, Ala. – West Florida completed their April comeback on Sunday afternoon at the Charger Softball Complex. With their 5-1 win over 10th ranked Alabama-Huntsville, West Florida earned the Gulf South Conference East number two seed for next weekend’s conference tournament. It was also a historic day for the Argonauts as West Florida (34-23, 14-10 GSC) completed their first double header sweep over the Chargers in Huntsville. Alabama-Huntsville (40-16, 13-10) will be the GSC East third seed for the GSC Tournament.”I firmly believe that we are finally playing to our potential,” said head coach Tami Cyr. “Our backs were against the wall and we came through this weekend.”After standing in next-to-last place on Apr. 11, West Florida is the GSC East Division second seed for next weekend’s GSC Tournament. West Florida will face the GSC West third seed Henderson State (26-13) on Friday at 11:45 a.m. CST. The tournament will be held at the Greenbrook Softball Complex in Southaven, Miss. Last season, the Argonauts went 2-2 at the tournament and were eliminated by Henderson State in the quarterfinals.Alabama-Huntsville took an early lead in the bottom of the second inning on a two out, RBI single by Megan Blanchard. But West Florida answered with a run in the top of the third inning. Kat Sheppard (Gulf Breeze, Fla./Milton HS) led off with a single, and pinch-runner Franny Bell (Navarre, Fla./Navarre HS) advanced to second on Melissa Chastang’s (Saraland, Ala./Satsuma HS) sacrifice bunt. Bell came around to score on Whitney Gay’s (Cantonment, Fla./Tate HS) two out, RBI single.West Florida took their first lead of the game on Nicky VanCamp’s (Davenport, Iowa/Kirkwood CC) lead off home run in the top of the fourth inning. It was VanCamp’s team-leading seventh home run of the season. Alabama-Huntsville put runners at second and third with one out in the bottom half of the inning, but West Florida starting pitcher Taren Walton (Pensacola, Fla./Daytona Beach CC) ended the inning with two groundouts.”I knew they (Alabama-Huntsville) were a great offensive team,” said Walton. “I wanted to shut down their power hitters while limiting their offensive potential.”West Florida increased their lead with three runs over the last two innings. Van Camp doubled to lead off the top of the sixth inning, and pinch-hitter Dawnyele Stapleton (Navarre, Fla./Navarre HS) was sacrificed to third by Valerie Staub (East Brunswick, N.J./Wallace-Dothan CC). With two outs, Heather Bell (Bradenton, Fla./Bayshore HS) reached on a two-base error, allowing Stapleton to score. Bell eventually advanced to third and scored on Chastang’s RBI single. West Florida completed the scoring in the top of the seventh inning on Staub’s RBI single down the left field line.Walton (17-8) won her sixth consecutive start after limiting Alabama-Huntsville to one run on six hits with a walk and three strikeouts. Courtney Hudson (5-4) suffered the loss after allowing five runs (three earned) on 12 hits with four strikeouts. VanCamp led West Florida with three hits.”I am so proud of this team,” said Cyr. “This team is made up of great people, and I have always believed in them. “They are a group of winners that never gave up.””Live Stats” and live broadcasts will be available for all of the Argonauts games at the GSC Tournament. Go to the softball page at www.goargos.com to follow all of the action at the tournamentPrint Friendly Versionlast_img read more