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Presiding Bishop, House of Deputies president appoint triennial leaders

first_img Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Washington, DC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC By ENS staffPosted Oct 3, 2012 October 6, 2012 at 2:22 pm While I agree with Mr. Allison’s suggestion that much might be done to clean up and simplify the many layers to which he refers, I would tell a personal story that concerns “membership” in our church. I was born and raised Roman Catholic, baptized and confirmed in that church.When I chose to become an Episcopalian after many years of no attendance and no affiliation anywhere, the liturgy of reception into the Episcopal Church was tremendously moving to me. Echoing Abp Tutu’s marvelous description that “the Holy Spirit just picked me up by the scruff of the neck and set me down there”, after months of inquiry and study that only reinforced my choice, I welcomed and perhaps needed the formality that confirmed that choice. It was a Very Big Deal, and I delighted in publicly acknowledging the guidance of the Holy Spirit, and in celebrating with my new community. It would be a loss to deny that opportunity to other newcomers for the sake of “cleaning things up.”The bathwater may need changing or refreshing, but let’s make sure we hold onto that baby. An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS October 3, 2012 at 6:06 pm I find it peculiar that the committees, commissions, etc of the church have only two representatives from the wonderful Diocese of Alabama.There seems to be several folks serving in multiple positions. What happened to the breadth of the church in the appointments. MJ Fowler says: President of the House of Deputies, Rector Martinsville, VA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Tampa, FL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Presiding Bishop, House of Deputies president appoint triennial leaders Submit an Event Listing Rector Collierville, TN Rector Bath, NC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Tags Comments are closed. Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Albany, NY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Course Director Jerusalem, Israel center_img Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Press Release Service TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Featured Jobs & Calls Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Smithfield, NC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Comments (2) Rector Hopkinsville, KY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Submit a Press Release Rector Shreveport, LA [Episcopal News Service] Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori and President of the House of Deputies Gay Clark Jennings have announced new appointments to the church’s standing commissions and joint standing committees of General Convention and committees of the House of Deputies and House of Bishops.Jefferts Schori appointed 115 bishops to those commissions and committees, as well as to the Court of Review for the Trial of a Bishop, the Title IV Disciplinary Board and nine House of Bishops committees.Jennings was responsible for appointing 142 lay and clergy leaders to standing commissions, joint standing committees and the House of Deputies Committee on the State of the Church. Nearly 750 people were nominated for leadership during an online process that began in July.The two also appointed the members of their councils of advice for the 2013-2015 triennium.Appointments to the task force on church structure established by Resolution C095 of the 77th General Convention, which met this past July will come later in October, according to a press release.The resolution calls for them to create a special task force of up to 24 people who will gather ideas in the next two years from all levels of the church about possible reforms to its structures, governance and administration. Its work will culminate in a special gathering of people from every diocese to hear what recommendations the task force plans to make to the 78th General Convention. Its final report is due by November 2014.The groups to which Jefferts Schori and Jennings made their appointments account for the majority of the church’s committees, commission, agencies and board (CCABs) that receive resolutions from General Convention and set policies for their implementation during the three years until the next meeting of convention. CCABs report to General Convention via what is known as the Blue Book, which is released in the months preceding each meeting of convention and includes recommended resolutions and policy decisions.The presiding bishop and the president of the House of Deputies appoint people to those bodies whose members are not elected by convention.Thirty percent of the newly appointed lay and clergy leaders are age 40 and younger, and nearly half — 47 percent — are age 50 and younger, according to Jennings’ release.While the median age of all Episcopalians in 2010 was 57, according to the release, the median age of these appointees is 52.“Thanks to many younger Episcopalians who volunteered to serve, the councils of the church will have much better representation from Gen X and Millennial leaders in the coming years,” Jennings said in the release. “We need to devote more energy and attention to cultivating younger leaders. We also need to identify and reduce the barriers that keep younger people from seeking positions of church leadership.”Jennings said she will appoint a study committee of the House of Deputies to focus on young leadership in October.Twenty-eight percent of the new appointees designated by Jennings are people of color.“The leadership of the church needs to look more like the kingdom of God and less like a parish directory of the 1950s,” she said. “This group of new leaders will help ensure that the church’s recent progress in fostering diversity continues.”The groups recently appointed include Jennings’ Council of Advice which, for the first time in memory, will include a bishop.“Bishop Sean Rowe of the Diocese of Northwestern Pennsylvania has generously agreed to sit on my council and foster closer collaboration between the two houses of General Convention,” she said.The council will meet for the first time in early December in Seattle, home to the group’s youngest member, 29-year-old Bryan Krislock.Jennings noted in her release that she and Jefferts Schori met and consulted frequently as they were making their respective appointments and choosing appointees and nominees to committees of Executive Council.“I am grateful for the warm welcome and collegiality of the Presiding Bishop and members of her staff during the first few months of my tenure,” said Jennings. “I’m learning the ropes, and I need the support of both new and old colleagues.”A complete list of Jefferts Schori’s appointments is here. Jennings release did not contain a list of name. They can be seen for each group using the links available here.Appointments to committees of Executive Council will be announced after the Oct. 15-18 council meeting in New Brunswick, New Jersey, according to Jennings’ release.Jennings has also launched a new website at www.houseofdeputies.org with news and information about the House of Deputies. People interested in receiving a monthly e-mail newsletter from the House of Deputies can sign up on the website. Youth Minister Lorton, VA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit a Job Listing Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET General Convention, Featured Events Rector Belleville, IL Jeff Allison says: Bishop Diocesan Springfield, ILlast_img read more

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RIP: The Very Rev. John Everitt Booty

first_img Diane Pearsall Ehrlich says: Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest April 23, 2013 at 10:14 pm I had the privilege of being a student at Sewanee with John Booty. he was a wonderful professor with a delightful sense of humor & a brilliant mind. my prayers are with Kitty Lou & the rest of his family April 23, 2013 at 5:12 pm John Booty was director of my curriculum conference — a class for first-year seminarians — at the Episcopal Divinity School, Cambridge in 1980-81. Although I was a “delayed vocation” student and a commuter, and thus not a part of the EDS community in the way that resident students were, John was as pastoral toward and supportive of me as he was of all his other students. I count it a great blessing to have known John and to have benefited from the other-directedness and compassion of this learned and wise, but also kind and deeply spiritual servant of God.. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Albany, NY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Press Release Service RIP: The Very Rev. John Everitt Booty Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Comments are closed. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis bob diaz says: Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit an Event Listing The Rev. Dr. Linda Lowry, F.O.C.D, Chaplain, Major USAF Retired says: Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Knoxville, TN (The Rev.) Ronald L. Reed says: Cathedral Dean Boise, ID January 13, 2014 at 3:57 pm Hi Diane. I randomly came across this posting while doing a Google search to check key words on my web site. Thanks for your kind words. I hope all is well with you and your family. Geoff Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT April 24, 2013 at 12:22 am Kitty lou we are sorry to hear about the passing of john.what a great man.my parents joe and jan send there condolinces to you and the family as well. Stephen Voysey says: Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Tags Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Posted Apr 23, 2013 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Featured Events Obituary, Rector Shreveport, LA The Rev. Sandra Boyd says: Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Pegram Johnson III, PHD says: Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Curate Diocese of Nebraska The Rev Sherrill Page says: Geoff Booty says: The Rev. Carlton T. Russell says: Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Collierville, TN The Very Rev. John Booty. Photo/Courtesy Duane Dale[Episcopal News Service] Scholar, teacher, poet, priest, beloved husband, father, and grandad, the Very Rev. John Booty died at age 87 April 17 at his home in Center Sandwich, New Hampshire. He goes joyfully to join his son Peter who died in 2010, and he leaves behind as witness to his love his wife of 62 years, Kitty Lou, his daughter Carol and her husband Ernie, his son Geoffrey and his wife Helen, Peter’s wife Diane, his daughter Jane and her husband Todd, nine grandchildren and four great grandchildren, all of whom gave him much happiness.John was born in Detroit, Michigan, on May 2, 1925,  earned a Bachelor of Divinity degree from Virginia Theological Seminary in Alexandria, Virginia, and began his life of service to the Episcopal Church as a curate at Christ Church, Dearborn, Michigan. After earning a Ph.D. from Princeton University, John joined the faculty at Virginia Seminary as Professor of Church History, taught at the Episcopal Divinity School in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and served as Dean of the Seminary at the University of the South in Sewanee, Tennessee. A life-long scholar, John was a Fellow of the Folger Shakespeare Library and the National Endowment for the Humanities, and he served as Historiographer of the Episcopal Church. He was awarded Honorary Doctor of Divinity degrees from Virginia Seminary and the University of the South. Also a gifted writer, John had numerous books published, including “The Church in History, Reflections on the Theology of Richard Hooker,” “John Jewel as Apologist of the Church of England, Meditating on Four Quartets,” and “The Christ We Know.” Secular scholars as well as ecclesiastics respected him, and all who were blessed to know him celebrated him.John Booty was a man of warmth and humor who loved reading, gardening, and tea on the porch. He struggled at times in life and shared himself freely through his writing and preaching as he brought countless disciples to the Gospel. His last days were populated by loving family, devoted “care angels,” lively memories of his past, and his abiding faith in life everlasting. We are grateful for his life with us, and we rejoice that he has gone to God.A celebration of John’s life will be held this summer at St. Andrew’s-in-the-Valley Episcopal Church, Tamworth, New Hampshire. Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Tampa, FL Submit a Press Release Rector Washington, DC Submit a Job Listing This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 April 23, 2013 at 8:18 pm John Booty was an inspiring professor and Senior Tutor. We were so blessed to spend time with him and his family at ETS. May he rest in peace…thanks be to God. July 10, 2013 at 10:01 am John Booty was my senior project / thesis advisor at Episcopal Divinity School in 1976-1977. What a special man in so many ways – intellectuallly, pastorally, liturgically – and most of all a deep soul with a warm and engaging spirit. God bless his family and many friends as we celebrate his life. People Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 April 25, 2013 at 11:30 pm Much saddened to hear of John’s death. In the early 1960s at Virginia Seminary we were inspired by John Booty, Charles Price, John Woolverton, Murray Newman, all young men getting started in their careers. These were balanced by senior professors Mollegen and Stanley. These were stimulating times, even for one who thought he knew it all already. I was wrong. I didn’t. The roster for a heavenly faculty is almost complete. June 30, 2013 at 11:19 am The Church has lost a great man! Dr. Booty was a wonderful inspiration to me and so many other seminarians while we were studying for the priesthood at Sewanee. He will be greatly missed! May he rest in peace and may light perpetual shine upon him. May God comfort all who mourn and give them the blessed assurance of everlasting life through Jesus Christ our Lord. Good-bye John+. You will be greatly missed. I hope to see you again in the Kingdom to come. Rector Hopkinsville, KY Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Bath, NC The Rev. Joan Grimm Fraser says: Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA June 25, 2013 at 7:37 pm I happened to see an article about the Rev. John Booty in this month’s issue of NH Episcopal News. I wondered how common a name Booty could be. So I just had to look up the obituary of Rev. Booty remembering that the father of one of my favorite “bosses” was an Episcopal Minster. There I found that Geoff Booty was indeed the son of the Rev. Booty….. I remember fondly the great leader that Geoff was. If you see this Geoff, I wish you and your family all well! Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Comments (11) April 24, 2013 at 5:48 pm I am another of those many privileged to have had John Booty as my academic mentor in 1977-8 at EDS in Cambridge. I’m also remembering fondly a visit to John and Kitty Lou sometime in the 1980s at their lovely home in Center Sandwich. My prayers are of thanksgiving and for comfort for Kitty Lou and John’s family in the assurance that John is in the loving arms of God. An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET April 23, 2013 at 5:54 pm I thank God for knowing John Booty and his family in Cambridge. He was a teacher, mentor and friend to me and many others. Above all, he was a good man. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Smithfield, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Belleville, ILlast_img read more

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No guns at Episcopal churches in Georgia, bishops say

first_img Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Gun Violence Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Tags Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Bruce Garner says: Rector Shreveport, LA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 April 29, 2014 at 5:41 pm Thanks be to God for bold bishops. Scott came from my diocese (NC) and I am proud of him. He also changed my thinking on same-sex blessings when he stood up in our diocese and said he had done a “same-sec blessing” for a couple who had been together for 36 years. How many weddings have we done that haven’t lasted a year? We (Episcopalians) bless boats, animals, homes, hunting hounds ~ you name it. Why not a committed couple? Thank you Scott for setting this old timer straight! You won’t remember me, but I sure as heck remember you. Deacon Tally Bandy, Diocese of North Carolina. Featured Jobs & Calls By ENS staffPosted Apr 29, 2014 Rector Pittsburgh, PA April 29, 2014 at 5:33 pm I am personally most disappointed not in the actions of our governor, but also the legislature for letting the bill even be introduced….and for those who chose to vote in favor as did my own representative……..I hope that this will open the eyes of the good people of the State of Georgia and asked that this be repealed……It is a very harmful law and has nothing to do with the right to bear arms as guaranteed by our constitution. Thank God for people like the Episcopal Bishops of Georgia…………. Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest April 30, 2014 at 11:54 pm http://anglicanink.com/article/bishops-gun-ban-misfires Rector Collierville, TN May 1, 2014 at 8:51 am Would this apply to church owned rectories? The letter says all church property. Submit a Press Release May 2, 2014 at 9:44 am My feeling is that if you feel the need to take a gun to church, you’re going to the wrong church. The Bishop is entirely within his rights to ban guns on church property within his diocese. We are a church governed by bishops, and he is the man. As a member of my parish vestry, I am under the direction of my bishop. The churches and other properties of the Episcopal Church belong to the diocese, not the individual parish. Read the canons. And since the members of the vestry are to serve as the spiritual leaders of the church, I can’t see any vestry choosing to approve a motion that would put any parishioner in danger.As far as this insane obsession with carrying firearms into public places, how exactly are we going to tell the difference between the armed “good guy” and the armed “bad guy”. Is everyone going to pull their gun out for a showdown in which I might be fought in the crossfire? This law is a threat to my safety, and my family and I will leave any public place when guns are carried by anyone!As for Jesus, guns were not around during his time on earth, so the argument about his tendency toward permission to carry in a house of worship is not appropriate. However, his instruction to love our neighbors as we love ourselves is. I’m pretty sure The Lord we serve would prefer we not shoot those we are instructed to love and serve. He might have cleared the money changers from the courtyard of the synagogue, but he did not act to save himself from one of the most violent deaths imaginable. And he did not choose to use violence against a regime that practiced daily violence and degedation against his own people. Both were within his power.In our service we greet each other by saying “Peace be with you. And also with you”. The same greeting Jesus used with his disciples . Every Sunday we are sent into to the world with the instruction to “Go forth to love and serve The Lord”. Jesus preached love, not violence. Thanks be to God. Youth Minister Lorton, VA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Comments (13) Press Release Service April 29, 2014 at 5:23 pm Thank God for our Georgia bishops taking a strong stand against this insane desire of many to introduce more guns into our society. – the Rev. Doug Carpenter, Birmingham This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Comments are closed. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group May 8, 2014 at 12:12 am Thanks be to God for our bishops. We who believe in Godhave to stand against this fear based obssession with guns. Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Talmage G. Bandy says: Submit an Event Listing Frank Logue says: Fr. Will McQueen says: Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL [Episcopal News Services] Firearms will not be permitted in buildings or on property of any Episcopal church anywhere in the state of Georgia, bishops of the two Georgia dioceses have said.Diocese of Atlanta Bishop Rob Wright and Diocese of Georgia Bishop Scott Benhase were responding to Gov. Nathan Deal’s April 24 signing of what is called the Safe Carry Protection Act of 2014. Each sent letters to clergy and lay leaders last week.The law, which expands broadly where guns may be carried, takes effect July 1. Places of worship may allow the carrying of weapons, but that permission must be granted by the ecclesiastical authority which, in the case of the Episcopal Church, is the diocesan bishop. Illegally bringing a gun into a house of worship will be considered a misdemeanor with a $100 fine. On-duty law enforcement officers will be exempt from the restriction.Wright said his “judgment and this policy are based on the normative understanding of the teachings of Jesus as The Episcopal Church has received them,” in his letter. “This matter and I hope this policy afford us yet another opportunity to live the words we pray each week.”Benhase wrote that in his judgment “firearms of any kind have no place in any of our church buildings.”“If I am requested by a congregation to grant them permission, as the laws provides but does not require, I will not grant such permission,” he wrote. “In my judgment, the only people who are appropriately allowed to carry firearms in any of our church buildings are law enforcement officers who are on duty at the time.”Benhase and Wright had previously issued a joint statement while the Georgia legislature was in session in March considering the bill decrying the measure and questioning the logic behind expanding gun-carry locations.More than 200 Georgia faith leaders spoke against having guns in houses of worship during the March session.— Diocese of Atlanta Director of Communication Nan Ross contributed to this article. Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Albany, NY May 2, 2014 at 11:33 pm Of course since the pistols are concealed, this entirely depends upon shall we say the integrity of those attending services, unless that is the Dioceses of Georgia and Atlanta intend to start “wanding” people as they come through the church doors. April 29, 2014 at 6:09 pm Our legislature can’t seem to pass anything beneficial to all Georgians, such as expanding Medicaid to cover those without insurance. But they can approve having guns carried anywhere one chooses, including bars and churches. Just what we need, a more lethal mixture of guns and alcohol. Yet, what should we expect from those who mandate drug testing for those getting food stamps and public assistance….forcing the least able to pay for establishing their own eligibility. It escapes me how people can claim to follow Jesus and do such un-Jesus-like things as these folks are doing. I suppose they forgot that Jesus told us that whatever we do or fail to do for these least of these His brothers and sisters, we do or fail to do for Him. I’m grateful the Episcopal Bishops in Georgia DO remember what Jesus said and taught! Greg Hopkins says: Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Washington, DC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Belleville, IL James Leagan says: Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA John Andrews says: TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit a Job Listing May 1, 2014 at 9:12 am Dear folks,I am not Episcopalian, but I’m alarmed by several things in your article and the comments.Are you aware that since 1950 ALL mass murders committed with firearms have been committed in “Gun Free Zones”? have you considered that your announce automatically paints a target on every church house? Please look at Carl Chinn’s site for an annual breakdown of violence committed in all houses of worship in the US. Then please read his book, “Evil Invades Sanctuary.”as for your traditions of pacifism laid down by your church, they are founded, I contend, in Biblical error. Neither Jesus nor the Bible forbids the legal use of force in appropriate situations. In fact God commands that we help the innocent, with deadly force if necessary. Pacifism was not even taught in the Church until 130-150 years after Jesus ascended. For the basis of my contention, please see my book, “A Time To Kill: The Myth of Christian Pacifism.” I think you should study the facts before pronouncements that could endanger your congregations. I have a lawyer for 24 years, have taught the Bible to adults for 40 years, am a nationally certified use-of-force trainer for civilians and police(formerly taught use-of-force law to the Huntsville, AL, police) and a court-certified expert witness in use-of-force and firearms. I also train armed church security teams here in AL.Wishing you safety,Greg Hopkins Rom.15:13 Director of Music Morristown, NJ Featured Events Catherine Meeks says: Ann Eubanks says: Rector Knoxville, TN Advocacy Peace & Justice, Rector Hopkinsville, KY No guns at Episcopal churches in Georgia, bishops say Chris Walchesky says: Rector Tampa, FL Associate Rector Columbus, GA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Smithfield, NC E.A. Garrett says: Greg Hopkins says: Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Bath, NC May 1, 2014 at 9:48 am While I can not speak to the Diocese of Atlanta, the statement of the Diocese of Georgia makes it clear that this applies to churches only and so would not extend to guns locked away in a car in the parking lot, or in the rectory, or elsewhere on church property. This is intentional. Bishop Benhase’ statement is clearly written to apply solely to our worship spaces and in those areas to limit firearms to only on duty law enforcement. As he is quoted in the article above, this applies to church buildings and is, in fact, merely keeping the previous status quo as permitted under the new law.The Rev. Canon Frank Logue, Canon to the OrdinaryEpiscopal Diocese of Georgia Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME May 1, 2014 at 9:13 am Sorry, all mass murders EXCEPT two. May 3, 2014 at 8:26 am It appears that some members of the Episcopal Church in Georgia have questions about the legitimacy of our Bishops’ decisions. I do not have the knowledge to speak to that, but I do have the knowledge to address the fact that when a bad or sick person with a gun decides to attack defenseless individuals, he (usually) chooses a target that is labeled “This is a gun free zone”. I believe that if Bishop Wright and Bishop Benhase choose to put up “This is a gun free zone” on their office doors or even on their Diocesan offices and personal residences, it is not a problem. But, they have chosen to put up these signs on every Episcopal church in Georgia.Every church member that goes onto our church property is wearing a sign, NO GUNS HERE! Does that make me feel better? No. And I suggest that this creates a tremendous moral and legal liability for our larger Church. The first time some crazy person enters an Episcopal Church and shoots somebody, the entire congregation will have the right to sue the persons responsible for creating the target on the property. The Bishops will be first in line and I will support the suit.Remember, when we repeat the Ten Commandments in church, we say, “You shall not murder.” The State of Georgia made guns at churches illegal to prevent black churches from mounting the credible defense of their churches and their members as they became politically active after the Civil War of the United States. Under The Bishops’ pronouncement, the Rector and Vestry cannot call upon their church members to protect their church with guns or knives or weapons, even if a credible threat becomes known to them. Only “On-duty law enforcement officers will be exempt from the restriction.” and can come upon church property with a weapon. The law going into effect on July 1 allows Licensed individuals to carry a weapon onto church grounds with the church’s permission. A Licensed individual has to submit to a fingerprint check as the state and national level, must have never been convicted of a felony and must be over the age of 21 or be a member of the armed forces of our country. This is a very small percentage of those in Georgia who own guns. This change removes a Jim Crow era restriction on gun control and allows law abiding individuals to protect themselves and their loved ones from danger. I support the intent and letter of the law. I reject the ignorance of our two Bishops. Douglas M. Carpenter says: Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJlast_img read more

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South Carolina: Bishop permits blessings of same-sex relationships

first_img Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group South Carolina Rector Belleville, IL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Featured Jobs & Calls Press Release Service In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Human Sexuality, Rector Collierville, TN AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA [Episcopal Church in South Carolina] The Right Reverend Charles G. vonRosenberg on July 8 granted permission for priests to bless the committed relationships of same-sex couples in The Episcopal Church in South Carolina.In authorizing the use of “The Witnessing and Blessing of a Lifelong Covenant,” vonRosenberg gave permission for priests to respond pastorally to couples who are in committed relationships, including those who have been married in states where same-sex marriage is allowed. South Carolina law does not permit marriage for same-sex couples, and the blessings performed here will not constitute a “marriage.”In his letter to clergy today, the bishop states that no priest is required to offer the blessing. “I do want to be clear that this permission does not define an expectation for clergy,” he wrote. “In your own life of prayer and within community, you will decide how to respond to this statement of permission.”Priests who wish to perform a blessing will not have to receive any further authorization from the bishop. However, before a priest can perform the ceremony in a church building, the vestry or mission committee of that church must have given its approval for such liturgies to be conducted there.To assist congregations in considering that decision, the bishop’s office has provided theological resources, recommended reading, and a model outline for conversations on the topic. Those resources are available on the diocesan website, episcopalchurchsc.org.Following the guidelines established by General Convention, one member of the couple must be a baptized Christian.Same-sex blessings were authorized for provisional use by The Episcopal Church in 2012 in a resolution at the 77th General Convention, A049, so that bishops “may provide generous pastoral response to meet the needs of members of this Church”.  Since then, more than 60 of the 110 dioceses of The Episcopal Church have allowed some form of liturgy for blessings of same-sex relationships.Regionally, 15 out of the 20 dioceses of Province IV – an area covering nine southeastern states – now permit the blessings. In the Diocese of Upper South Carolina, Bishop Andrew Waldo announced May 8 that he would permit the blessings.The liturgy was approved for “provisional” use by General Convention in 2012, and is expected to be revisited at the next General Convention in 2015. For that reason, vonRosenberg’s letter requests that priests performing the blessings report each ceremony to the Bishop’s Office. This documentation will be added to the experiences shared from around the church at General Convention.The Standing Committee of diocese, acting as a council of advice for the Bishop, began considering same-sex blessings in 2013 and spent several months reviewing the materials approved by General Convention. In September 2013 the Standing Committee voted unanimously to advise the Bishop to move forward with developing and authorizing a liturgy. A Diocesan Committee on Blessings, with clergy and lay members from around the diocese, worked with the bishop to adapt the materials approved by General Convention into a liturgy for local use. The resulting document, “The Witnessing and Blessing of a Lifelong Covenant,” is available online at episcopalchurchsc.org. Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Featured Events Rector Bath, NC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit a Job Listing Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Same-Sex Blessings, Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Albany, NY Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Martinsville, VA Submit a Press Release By diocesan staffPosted Jul 8, 2014 Director of Music Morristown, NJ Youth Minister Lorton, VA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Tags Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Washington, DC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Knoxville, TN Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT South Carolina: Bishop permits blessings of same-sex relationships Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Hopkinsville, KY An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Tampa, FL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA last_img read more

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Juan David Alvarado elected bishop of El Salvador

first_img Rector Belleville, IL Rector Tampa, FL Comments (2) Youth Minister Lorton, VA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Curate Diocese of Nebraska TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA August 26, 2014 at 1:01 am A fifteen-minute election presupposes a single ballot. That’s very often a sign of the very powerful action of the Holy Spirit. It’s also the sign of a church dispatching its business in record time. All blessings to Bishop-elect Alvarado! In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Knoxville, TN Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Comments are closed. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Featured Events Anglican Communion, Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Lisa Fox says: Rector Bath, NC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York People, Bishop Elections, The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Associate Rector Columbus, GA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Fr. Gaylord Hitchcock says: Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Featured Jobs & Calls Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Martinsville, VA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Collierville, TN Province IX Rector Washington, DC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET August 26, 2014 at 12:36 am I give thanks for all those who stood for this election. May God richly bless the church in El Salvador. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Shreveport, LA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Hopkinsville, KY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Albany, NY Submit a Job Listing Bishop-elect of El Salvador Juan David Alvarado will in January of 2015 replace Bishop of El Salvador Martin Barahona who will retire. Photo: Anglican-Episcopal Church of El Salvador.[Episcopal News Service] The Rev. Juan David Alvarado was elected bishop of the Anglican-Episcopal Church in El Salvador on Aug. 23 at St. John the Evangelist Church in San Salvador.His consecration/installation is scheduled for Jan. 24, 2015.Alvarado, 52, will succeed the Rt. Rev. Martín Barahona who is retiring.Elected in 1992, Barahona became the first Salvadoran to serve as bishop. Prior to Barahona’s election and the end of El Salvador’s 1980-1992 civil war, then-Bishop of Panama James H. Ottley oversaw the church in El Salvador from Panama.Alvarado was elected from a slate of five candidates, including two North Americans.The other candidates were: The Rev. Ricardo Bernal, Diocese of El Salvador;The Rev. Juan Antonio Méndez, Diocese of El Salvador;The Rev. Vidal Rivas, senior priest, St. Matthew’s/San Mateo Parish, Hyattsville, Maryland, Diocese of Washington; andThe Rev. Lee Alison Crawford, vicar, Church of Our Saviour at Mission Farm and canon missioner to El Salvador, Diocese of Vermont.Alvarado was elected on the second ballot with 35 of 50 lay votes and 8 of 14 clergy votes.The bishop-elect is married to the Rev. Irma Alvarado; the couple has two children.The Anglican-Episcopal Church of El Salvador, along with the Anglican and Episcopal Churches in Costa Rica, Guatemala, Panama and Nicaragua, make of the Anglican Church in Central America, or IARCA, as it is know by its Spanish Acronym. Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Latin America, Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Tags Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Press Release Service By ENS staffPosted Aug 25, 2014 Submit a Press Release Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Juan David Alvarado elected bishop of El Salvadorlast_img read more

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Virginia Theological Seminary celebrates a chapel raised from ashes

first_img Submit an Event Listing Rector Albany, NY Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Director of Music Morristown, NJ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Rector Columbus, GA Virginia Theological Seminary celebrates a chapel raised from ashes Daylong festivities of dedication, consecration point to the future Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Curate Diocese of Nebraska Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Shreveport, LA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Submit a Press Release Virginia Theological Seminary’s new Immanuel Chapel, dedicated and consecrated Oct. 13, stands beyond the ruins of the 1881 building that was destroyed in a fire Oct. 22, 2010. The ruins are now a memorial garden. Photo: Peter Aaron Otto/Robert A.M. Stern Architects[Episcopal News Service] With three knocks on the door from Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori, Virginia Theological Seminary began a year-long celebration its new Immanuel Chapel Oct. 13, just short of five years after its predecessor was destroyed by fire.“In 2010 to the glory of God this chapel burned and was rebuilt 2015,” Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby said, beginning his sermon by paraphrasing a sign in Coventry Cathedral in England, which burned in 1940 and was rebuilt in 1962. “Is it possible? Can such an event ever be seen to glory of God? Why yes, because in death and resurrection we are drawn back into the presence of the living God who raised Jesus Christ from the dead.”Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori knocks three times on the door to Virginia Theological Seminary’s new Immanuel Chapel at the beginning of the building’s dedication and consecration Oct. 13. Photo: Virginia Theological SeminaryJefferts Schori stood outside the chapel and used her pastoral staff to knock three times on the chapel door and declared, “Let the doors be opened.” She then marked a sign of the cross on the threshold with the staff. “Peace be to this house and to all who enter here,” she said.Following the order in the Book of Common Prayer, the episcopal participants blessed in turn the baptismal font (retired Diocese of Utah Bishop Carolyn Tanner Irish, honorary co-chair of the capital campaign for the chapel), the processional cross and torches (retired Diocese of Easton Bishop James Shand, VTS board of trustees chair), the organ (Presiding Bishop-elect Michael Curry) and the ambo/pulpit  (25th Presiding Bishop Frank Griswold, co-chair of the capital campaign for the chapel).Jefferts Schori blessed the altar prior to it being vested and set for the Great Thanksgiving. Virginia Bishop Shannon Johnston blessed the ambry after communion.The sequence hymn, written for the service by the Rev. Carl P. Daw Jr. as a gift from the Class of 2015, included the request that God “build us a faithful household set upon a holy hill.” The seminary commissioned its professor of church music, the Rev. William Bradley Roberts, to write “A Festal Gloria,” which was sung after the altar was vested and set, and before the peace.All of it was in celebration of the new chapel building. Welby warned during his sermon that church buildings can be both blessings and burdens: “Sometimes they are the servants of the church,” he said, and sometimes they are the church’s tyrant with their “demands and instructions.”Church buildings are only brick and mortar but, buildings such as the new Immanuel Chapel’s “astonishing and wonderful and beautiful space” welcome pilgrims and give them a sense of “exultation and beauty.”People drawn together to worship come with untidy hearts filled with joy, sorrow, worry, undiscerned callings and shame of sin, and emerge transformed and reoriented towards service, he said. “Holiness is not neat and clean, abiding by rules,” he said. “It is fire and flame, consuming the dark and the dirt. It is beauty and fear, causing us to fall on our faces, appalled by our sin, drawn by its radiant light and healing heat. But holiness is never tidy.”And, while worship can transform and reorient participants, it should never seek to make people conformists, he said. “Let this never be a place that seeks to tidy people up,” Welby said.The archbishop called for the chapel to “orientate and shape those who will carry the torch of unity.” Saying his heart breaks when he contemplates the divisions in the world, Welby prayed, “O God, we needed a united church.”Welby also cited the Anglican Communion’s divisions, “in which I am personally, deeply implicated.” He called on the congregation to “recognize, contemplate and mourn” the fact that “we too turn from God and lose sight of God’s mission.”The church must be built on the rock of obedience to Jesus’ word, the archbishop said.“There is no compromise with that message. Without it, this is a museum, an interesting social anthropology,” he said. “With Jesus as its focus and center, it is a channel of the breaking in of the kingdom of God. For Immanuel Chapel to live up to the beauty of its architecture it must a place not of tidiness or conformity but of transformation and daily conversion, as St. Benedict would have it. It is to be a place where the encounter with God turns a traveling crowd of pilgrims into the people who meet God in Christ.”And, having met God in Christ, the pilgrims who come in as sinners, Welby said, “find forgiveness and go out with new heart and hope to transform a world in which otherwise darkness seems to extinguish light, fear surrounds and despair-filled suffering encompasses the weakest and the poorest.”The text of Welby’s sermon is here.Diocese of Virginia Bishop Shannon Johnston, Virginia Theological Seminary Dean Ian Markham, Deacon Susan Ackley Lukens, Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori, Presiding Bishop-Elect Michael Curry and Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby sing Oct. 13 at the altar in Immanuel Chapel during the building’s dedication and consecration Eucharist. Photo: Richard SchoriThe service’s offertory was dedicated to the effort to rebuild the Episcopal Diocese of Haiti’s Holy Trinity Cathedral in Port-au-Prince, which was destroyed by an earthquake in January 2010.“As a community we are very conscious that our loss coincided with the earthquake in Haiti that destroyed the cathedral,” said the Very Rev. Ian S. Markham, dean and president of VTS, in his welcome. “As we celebrate, we want to do our part in bringing close to the moment that our sisters and brothers in Haiti will celebrate in their new cathedral.”“This seminary is determined to continue to serve The Episcopal Church and the wider Anglican Communion through this chapel,” Markham said. “We take to heart what we heard from the archbishop of Canterbury. We still strive to seek to serve God and, in all things, to God be the glory.”The post-communion hymn, “Great is Thy Faithfulness,” echoed the day the previous chapel was destroyed. It had been sung by those whom Markham called together for prayer as the 1881 Immanuel Chapel was burning.Later on Oct. 13, Welby officiated at a choral evensong that began with 25th Presiding Bishop Griswold standing high up in the bell tower, blessing the chapel’s new bells. A microphone malfunction required Griswold to begin the service three times. Finally blessed without benefit of a working microphone, the bells pealed as Griswold left the tower to return to the narthex for the procession.The chapel’s tower features eight change ringing bells. Cast by Whitechapel Foundry in London, the bells were lifted into place in late 2014. Whitechapel Foundry, the oldest manufacturing company in Britain, also cast the original Liberty Bell and Big Ben, the hour bell in the clock at Westminster. In change ringing no attempt is made to produce a conventional melody; the bells are rung in a set of permutations.Evensong also included dedication of two works of art. One, “Icon of the Incarnation”, was commissioned of Olga Shalamova. The other was a sculpture, “Mary as Prophet.” Commissioned of Margaret Adams Parker, the sculpture placed outside the chapel depicts Mary as a young teenager who carries the Eternal Word and is prompted to share the world-changing message.Presiding Bishop-Elect Michael Curry, Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori, Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby, former Presiding Bishop Frank Griswold and Virginia Theological Seminary Dean Ian Markham gather Oct. 13 before the seminary’s consecration and dedication of Immanuel Chapel. Photo: Matt Rhodes/VTS via FacebookFollowing evensong, Robert A.M. Stern, founder and senior partner of the New York architectural firm that designed chapel, addressed the congregation. Stern said he was grateful to be able to contribute to the seminary’s mission. “The design of a sacred space is one of the great privileges that an architect could wish for,” he said.After thanking his staff, colleagues and the actual builders, Stern also thanked the seminary community and its vision “Architects are only as good as their clients let them be,” he said, to some laughter and applause.In introducing Stern, Markham said the school wanted a building that looked like it had always been a part of the existing “village of buildings” on campus and also one that offered new possibilities for worship.“As you look around the new Immanuel Chapel I hope you will judge that we have found our way, that we have found something fresh to say amidst our troubled present,” Stern said. “And as we move into the unknowable future I hope our intent to build for the ages will be rewarded.”The architect said rather than be simply replicate the 1881 building, or design one that was only innovative, his firm wanted to embrace the seminary’s past as well as its vision for the future. “We did not set out to build a 19th century church,” he said.The firm, whose clients range from universities to Disneyland and the New York theater district, designed a building with the flexibility to accomplish the seminary’s mission to teach future clergy to lead worship while serving “as an understated backdrop to a range of liturgical purposes from large-scale celebrations to intimate services.” The seminary’s chapel also has been home to the parish now known as Immanuel Church-on-the-Hill since the mid-19th century.The day’s celebrations kicked off a “dedicatory year” of events at the seminary to celebrate the new chapel.The Oct. 22, 2010, fire that destroyed the 1881 chapel building at Virginia Theological Seminary was ruled accidental by the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives. Photo: U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives and the Alexandria Fire Department.The U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) investigated the 2010 fire and ruled six days after the blaze that it had been an accident. The federal response is routine when a fire of that size occurs in a house of worship, the seminary and the ATF said at the time. The fire began in a trashcan left near a heater in the sacristy.The late Victorian wooden structure had no smoke detector or sprinkler system, and the fire spread quickly. Damage to the chapel, consecrated in 1881, was estimated at $2.5 million, the ATF said.The school’s trustees agreed in November 2011 to build a new chapel to replace the one that was destroyed. The remnants of the 1881 building were preserved as a memorial garden.Ground was broken in September 2013 and the first Eucharist was celebrated in the new chapel on Feb. 12, 2015.The new Immanuel Chapel is part of a “Worship and Welcome” quad, which includes an improved welcome center and a new motor court, creating a new gateway from Seminary Road to the campus.The school’s “Chapel for the Ages” capital campaign raised more than $14.3 million for the project. The campaign was chaired by Cynthia C. (Cece) Fowler, the Rev. J. Barney Hawkins IV (VTS vice president of institutional advancement) and 25th Presiding Bishop Griswold. Retired Utah Bishop Tanner Irish was honorary co-chair.The order of service for the dedication and consecration Eucharist is here.The order of service for evensong is here.Both services were live streamed. The Eucharist is available for viewing here. Evensong is available for viewing here.– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Theological Education Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Youth Minister Lorton, VA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit a Job Listing Tags Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Martinsville, VA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Smithfield, NC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Oct 14, 2015 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Tampa, FL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Bath, NC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Knoxville, TN Press Release Service Rector Belleville, IL Rector Hopkinsville, KY In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Featured Events Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DClast_img read more

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Dangerous ‘horror’ location transformed into refugee welcome center

first_img Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Washington, DC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Knoxville, TN Tags Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Dangerous ‘horror’ location transformed into refugee welcome center Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET A night time rescue of refugees on the Greek island of Lesbos.Photo: United Society[Anglican Communion News Service] A dangerous “horror” location on the Greek island of Lesbos has been turned into a 24-hour reception center offering shelter, food and medical care to vulnerable refugees. The work has been carried out by the church-based Lighthouse Refugee Relief (LRR) agency using funds provided through the Anglican mission agency United Society’s Rapid Response Appeal.The center is located in the Korakas area of north-east Lesbos, where hundreds of refugees are arriving daily by boat, tired, hungry and often traumatized.The LRR is running the center at night while other organization operate it during the day. “The immediate effect of providing help to those arriving at night was obvious,” LRR volunteer coordinator Henry Hartley said. “Our presence meant security in the area was tighter, and slowly all the ‘opportunists’ left the area.“Also, because of our night time presence, the teams during the day could start building infrastructure knowing that theft is no longer a problem. At present, the Korakas area is being looked after by LRR at night – with both medical and non-medical volunteers – and by CK Team and Migrant Aid Europe during the days.”Hartley said that in the eight weeks since they arrived, “the Korakas area has been transformed from a horror story for anyone landing there to being welcomed and received by a dedicated team of volunteers and medics.”The United Society used its donations to purchase a 4×4 vehicle for transporting refugees on rapidly deteriorating dirt roads, including emergency trips to hospital; as well as safety equipment, lighting and tents. They were also able to construct huts and a kitchen as well as daily running costs for things like petrol, firewood and food.“There are huge needs, particularly concerning unaccompanied minors, pregnant women and the most vulnerable among the refugees,” the Church of England’s Suffragan Bishop in Europe, David Hamid, said. “Your generous donations to United Society will be put to excellent use.”Hartley added: “In summary, the funding from United Society has been directly responsible for saving lives.”The United Society partnered with the Diocese of Europe last year to establish the Rapid Response Fund as it worked ecumenically to reach out to refugees during the current crisis. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Tampa, FL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Bath, NC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Curate Diocese of Nebraska Featured Jobs & Calls Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJcenter_img Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit an Event Listing Anglican Communion, Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Collierville, TN Rector Martinsville, VA Submit a Job Listing Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Press Release Service Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Posted Jan 19, 2016 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Albany, NY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Refugees Migration & Resettlement Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Featured Events Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Belleville, IL last_img read more

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Anglican leaders in Ireland react to death of Irish politician…

first_img Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Posted Mar 21, 2017 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Albany, NY In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Featured Events Submit an Event Listing Rector Knoxville, TN Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis [Anglican Communion News Service] The Anglican leaders of the Church in Ireland have issued statements on the death of Martin McGuinness, the ex-IRA leader-turned-politician who has died aged 66. McGuinness worked at the heart of the power-sharing government following the 1998 peace settlement.Full article. Rector Hopkinsville, KY The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Anglican leaders in Ireland react to death of Irish politician Martin McGuinness Anglican Communion, Tags Faith & Politics Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Washington, DC Rector Belleville, IL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit a Job Listing Featured Jobs & Calls New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME center_img Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Rector Columbus, GA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Tampa, FL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit a Press Release Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Youth Minister Lorton, VA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Collierville, TN Rector Bath, NClast_img read more

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Teaching bishops to be bishops

first_img Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ June 23, 2017 at 3:50 pm If, as the Catechism says, there are 4 orders of ministry in the Epis. Church, it seems logical thatthe Board for the training of Bishops should have similar membership. A weighting towardsa greater number of bishops would be acceptable. But all orders should be present ( at leasttwo in each order). AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Director of Music Morristown, NJ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS House of Bishops June 24, 2017 at 1:01 pm I think teaching Bishops to be Disciples of Jesus would be better service to the Church. An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET June 23, 2017 at 3:38 pm There is an ELCA program to help “baby” bishops learn how to be bishops in the fullest sense.Glad to learn of the Episcopal churches program as well. r h lewis (VTS 1963) says: June 28, 2017 at 2:15 pm Spirituality is the Key. Spirituality can not be attained in training/workshop for “baby bishops” regardless of who is leading this group… Spirituality is a virtue and cultivated and nourished throughout one’s early years and expanded/renewed in the growth of this Spirituality a constant throughout one’s life, fullfillment neverending… Spirituality has been described as a sacred virtue of the soul. And I must add that as an almost “cradle to grave” Episcopalian of the core Holy Trinity. I have been so blessed with those bishops/clergy who are inspired as briefly described above…Thus when one does “encounter” bishops/clergy who do not reflect this spirituality in voice/action this moment in time is astounding, reverberating–as those bishops/clergy have the position of great disservice to parishioners and the greater community which they are inherently obligated to serve… For those who have not experienced this firsthand may not be able to imagine such in our great Episcopal tradition, but to those who can relate/connect, this can be a voice of resonance of our long tradition of our Baptismal Covenant and following the Ministry of our Dear Saviour and Redeemer our Dear Lord Jesus Christ. Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Tags Rector Collierville, TN Comments are closed. Dr.Erna I. Lund says: Dr. William A. Flint, MDiv, PhD says: Rector Bath, NC Featured Events Rector Shreveport, LA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA June 24, 2017 at 2:51 pm Who tells the Bishops when dealing with someone they dislike or not happy with, the best way is to remove themselves from fellowship with the troublemaker, to avoid the person, not to respond to requests, and so on? if we were to practice that in our congregations we will be soon by ourselves. Is it love by design non transactional? I have seen the behavior in different Bishops and t is like they heard that somewhere? I am mostly curious, as it sounds to me one of those transfers from the market place and corporate discipline that we end up with frequently. Fr Juan Quevedo says: By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Jun 23, 2017 Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Featured Jobs & Calls Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Press Release Service Submit a Job Listing This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Rector Columbus, GA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit an Event Listing Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Teaching bishops to be bishops College for Bishops faces time of change and questions Rector Albany, NY Submit a Press Release Rector Knoxville, TN Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Belleville, IL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Martinsville, VA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Comments (6) In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID June 24, 2017 at 8:03 am I know this is not the intention of this training … but this process of “bishops teaching bishops,” with little input from the other orders, will mostly yield a conformity to the expectations of other bishops, rather than an openness to the needs of their own diocese … which might need a whole different model for a bishop. It is harder to “color outside the lines” when your colleagues are instructing you how to stay in the lines. The job of a bishop is stressful and demanding. There does not seem to be much re-thinking and experimenting with new models. Maybe continuing what has been done for the last 17 years is not the best way … but it is what we usually do! New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books The Rev. George Glazier says: The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Smithfield, NC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK One of the goals of the College for Bishops is to connect new bishops. Diocese of Spokane Bishop Gretchen Rehberg (ordained March 18), left, and Diocese of Central New York Bishop DeDe Duncan-Probe (ordained Dec. 3) and Diocese of Indianapolis Bishop Jennifer Baskerville-Burrows (ordained April 29) share conversation after lunch on June 14. They were at the Roslyn Retreat Center in Richmond, Virginia, for the 2017 session of Living Our Vows, the college’s three-year formation program for new bishops. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service] How do you learn to be a bishop? For most of the Episcopal Church’s life, new bishops learned on the job with little or no outside help.It’s only in the last 24 years that the church has had a formal process for such learning. That process, run by the College for Bishops, is about to undergo a major transition.Bishop F. Clayton Matthews, who leads the college in his role as the head of the presiding bishop’s Office of Pastoral Development, will retire June 30. He served in that role since 1998.Matthews led the formation of the College for Bishops’ three-year program for new bishops, known as Living Our Vows, in 2004. The college also provides continuing education offerings for all bishops. Living Our Vows was developed after a multi-year study of bishops’ needs. The resulting program is designed to help bishops grow spiritually, vocationally and in “their capacity to provide the kind of leadership that the Church needs for the mission of Jesus to which we are called,” Presiding Bishop Michael Curry said.The College for Bishops will leave the pastoral development office with Matthews when he retires. He will report to Curry and direct the college’s formation mission for another two years on a part-time basis.Eastern Michigan Bishop Todd Ousley succeeds Matthews as head of the pastoral development office on July 5. That office will continue to support the House of Bishops and the presiding bishop with pastoral care of bishops, their families and diocesan systems; and mediation in Title IV disciplinary matters.The College for Bishops has been part of the Office of Pastoral Development until now. However, its status within the governance structure of the Episcopal Church changed in 2010. The House of Bishops unanimously voted to incorporate it as a separate nonprofit entity. Matthews explained that the college is now owned by the House of Bishops. It has a $6 million endowment, according to Matthews.All of the changes come as the Task Force on the Episcopacy considers the election, appointment, roles and responsibilities of the church’s bishops. General Convention asked in 2015 for the study. It also charged the task force with proposing to the 2018 convention a new process for discernment, nomination, formation, search, election and transition of bishops.Some members of the Task Force on the Episcopacy are challenging the ownership of the college and the fact that it reports directly to the presiding bishop.Participants in the 2017 session of Living Our Vows, the College for Bishops’ three-year formation program for new bishops, discuss (via teleconference) author Donna Hicks’ research about the role of dignity in conflict resolution. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceLiving Our Vows – sometimes known around the church as “Baby Bishop School” – consists mainly of an annual one-week “residency” meeting. Some of the classes offered during the week are geared to whether a participant is a first-, second- or third-year bishop. They run the gamut from canon law to leadership training to dealing with the media. Bishops debrief each other on incidents that have occurred in their dioceses, offering them as a chance for all to learn.A so-called “Hats and Sticks” session teaches bishops what to do with their miter and crozier, and when to do it. There is a session on the liturgies in the Book of Common Prayer at which only a bishop presides: confirmation and ordinations.Bishops listen June 14 as Mary Kostel, special counsel to the presiding bishop for property litigation and discipline, explains the Episcopal Church’s clergy discipline canon, known as Title IV. The session was part of Living Our Vows, the College for Bishops’ three-year formation program for new bishops. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceBuilding community is another goal of Living Our Vows. Beginning with a gathering of new bishops and their spouses each January, the college connects bishops elected around the same time. Some so-called “classes” are large – the 2017 one has 12 – while some are small, such as the Class of 2015 with four. Twenty-five bishops participated in the 2017 session, held June 12-16 at the Roslyn Retreat Center in Richmond, Virginia.“You realize that you’re not alone,” said the Rt. Rev. Gretchen Rehberg, who became the bishop of Spokane in mid-March. The program, she said, is beginning to teach her to whom to turn for help in doing what she called “a singular job.”Puerto Rico Bishop-elect Rafael Morales Maldonado said his first session of Living Our Vows comes at a “providential” time. He will be ordained as a bishop on July 22.The Class of 2017 also includes bishops and bishops-elect from Central New York, Indianapolis, Northern Indiana, Pennsylvania, Los Angeles, Spokane and Western North Carolina, as well as the church’s federal ministries bishop and three from Toronto in the Anglican Church of Canada. That diversity is “a treasure for me,” Morales said.“In many cases, their experiences are similar but in different contexts,” he said.Diocese of Pennsylvania Bishop Daniel Gutierrez, center left, shares a smile with Diocese of Los Angeles Bishop Coadjutor-Elect John Taylor, center right, during the June 14 Bible study that was part of Living Our Vows. Presenter Matthew Sheep (striped shirt), Central Gulf Coast Bishop Russell Kendrick (light blue shirt back to camera), Eastern Oregon Bishop Patrick Bell and Bishop Suffragan for the Armed Forces and Federal Ministries Carl Wright were also part of the group. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceQuebec Bishop Bruce Myers, in the Class of 2016, represents a growing trend for the college: welcoming bishops from elsewhere in the Anglican Communion. There are currently four Canadian bishops participating. And the session at Roslyn was the last for El Salvador Bishop David Alvarado from the Anglican Province of Central America.Myers said the college is giving him “some intentional formation around what becoming a bishop and serving in the order of bishops is all about.” That work happens with the Canadian bishops in the program (there is no such training in Canada), as well as Episcopal Church bishops.“In a way, this is a great leveling place and we find the common ground of our episcopal ministry,” he said.Living Our Vows pairs new bishops with a “peer coach” bishop. Myers’ is Bishop Steve Lane of Maine, whose diocese forms a common border with Quebec.The Canadian bishops might, he said, bring to the college “a glimpse of a church that’s similar in many ways, shares a common territory and common context in many ways, but is dealing with those realities, perhaps, in slightly different ways simply because of our circumstances,” he saidFor example, the abusive legacy of the residential school system obligates Myers’ church to find ways to “walk together with indigenous Anglican and indigenous Canadians outside the church in meaningful and appropriate ways.” That work might be an example to the Episcopal Church bishops, he said.Diocese of Massachusetts Bishop Alan Gates speaks to Bishop F. Clayton Matthews, right, and retired Bishop Suffragan Terry Dance of the Anglican Church of Canada’s Diocese of Huron, during a June 14 Bible study that was part of Living Our Vows. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceMassachusetts Bishop Alan Gates, who finished Living Our Vows with the recent session, said the college is valuable in two ways. First is the content. “There is no training track for bishops in advance of election because our polity, our theology, suggests that we don’t know in advance who will be called to be a bishop,” he said.Second, he said, “it would be hard to overstate the importance” of the creating support networks, he said, noting that many bishops work alone in their dioceses without bishop suffragans or assistants.“It’s widely misconstrued as a kind of exclusive attitude that bishops would feel the need for more time together,” he said. “But, for me, that’s not what’s driving it. It really is a yearning for that kind of support, knowing and being known by others who face the particular challenges of this.”Collegiality in the House of Bishops is one of the college’s goals. In an interview with Episcopal News Service (available here), Matthews said the atmosphere in the house when he began his work was “toxic” and one of “total distrust.” This stemmed mainly from the wider church’s debate about the full inclusion of LGBT people in the life of the church, he said.“We had to create an atmosphere where there was more respect within the house for the context in which bishops worked,” he said.The presiding bishop said the plan is working. “I have seen it in the 17 years that I have been a bishop,” he said. “I have seen real development and real growth in our capacity to be a community of bishops and spouses that is real and genuine.”“I’ve seen the impact of that in the house in terms of our increased capacity to be able to navigate complex and sometimes difficult terrain in decision-making as a community and still maintain relationships that bind us together,” he said.The college helps bishops be “more deeply faithful and effective in the performance of our duties and in the living out of our episcopal ministry,” the presiding bishop said.A bishop’s work and ministry are different from that of a priest, Curry said, recalling that an older bishop told him that when he first became a bishop he was really changing careers.The college faces a great challenge in forming bishops who can help lead the Episcopal Church into becoming a branch of the Jesus Movement, he said. The coming question is how to train bishops so they can provide spiritual leadership to the church so it can “bear witness to a way of being Christians that actually looks something like Jesus of Nazareth?”Diocese of Texas Bishop Andy Doyle, a member of the college’s board of directors, sets up the June 14 Bible study that was part of Living Our Vows, the college’s three-year formation program for new bishops. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceThe presiding bishop chairs the college’s board of directors and nominates its members. Of the 19 current members, 14 are male bishops, four are lay people and one is a priest. The priest and one of the lay members are bishops’ wives.In the next two years, Matthews said, he hopes he is “not having to spend all of my energy defending the right of the college to exist.”The Very Rev. Gary Hall, a task force member, said he and others are not concerned about the existence of the college, but about its governance. If all orders of the church elect bishops, then the board of the entity charged with forming bishops ought to better represent all those orders.Hall said that making the college a separate entity worries some on the task force because the curriculum and the logistics of the programs were developed when the college was part of the church. That intellectual property left the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society (the name under which church is incorporated) when the college separately incorporated, Hall contended.He sees nothing nefarious in the college’s effort.“I think that the desire to make it a [nonprofit entity] was a desire to protect it financially, and nobody really thought through the implications of that in terms of the legal issues or the governance issues or accountability to the whole church.”However, the move points to an attitude that Hall called “episcopal exceptionalism.”“The culture of bishops in my working life has become much more distinct from the culture of the rest of the church,” he said.This has happened in the same years that the church has moved to an understanding of baptism as being the “fundamental commissioning of ministry.”“The culture of the episcopacy has gone in exactly the opposite direction,” said Hall, who was ordained in 1977. An insular formation process contributes to that trajectory, he added.A bishop’s job is getting harder, Hall said, and he believes they need “all the professional education and support that they can get. That’s not the issue. The issue is we all have a stake in the education and wellness of bishops.”The task force is due to make its proposals to General Convention via a “Blue Book” report sometime early next year. The suggestions will be debated during the July 5-13, 2018, meeting in Austin, Texas.– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is senior editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME William Horn says: Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Pittsburgh, PA last_img read more

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Maundy Thursday commandment reveals new depth, challenges in Holy Land…

first_img Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Israel-Palestine, Presiding Bishop Michael Curry Middle East, In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Featured Events Youth Minister Lorton, VA Comments are closed. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Pittsburgh, PA Holy Week/Easter, AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis March 29, 2018 at 2:55 pm Without knowing all the detail I would agree that the new Jerusalem Municipality tax plan may be unwise though somebody has to pay the bills! But since Muslim entities will apparently also be taxed the move does not seem to be specifically anti-Christian., Curate Diocese of Nebraska Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit an Event Listing Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Belleville, IL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Presiding Bishop Michael Curry washes congregants’ feet March 29 at the Anglican Cathedral Church of St. George the Martyr in Jerusalem during the cathedral’s Maundy Thursday service. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service – Jerusalem] Jesus’ commandment to his disciples on the night before he was killed, that they should love one another as he loved them, took on deeper meanings tinged with political challenges March 29 for those on a Holy Week pilgrimage with Presiding Bishop Michael Curry.The group spent part of the day discussing the struggle for peace in the Holy Land, and part of the day participating in traditional Holy Week liturgies. Even then, they heard the call for justice and harmony among followers of the Abrahamic religions Judaism, Christianity and Islam, each of which considers Jerusalem to be a holy city.“As we pray for the peace of Jerusalem, as the Bible teaches us, we must find ways to work for the peace of Jerusalem, which will be found where there is true equality for all, true justice for all and true freedom for everyone,” Curry told Episcopal News Service, as he reflected shortly before the traditional Maundy Thursday Eucharist and foot-washing service. “Here it is clear that this is not simply an idealistic dream. It is the only hope, and we must not rest until it is realized.”Curry’s complete reflection on his pilgrimage experience so far can be found here.The group began the day with an early-morning visit to the site known to Muslims as Haram Al Sharif (the Noble Sanctuary) and to Jews as the Temple Mount. Mohammed Azam Al-Khatib, director general of the Department of Awqaf Jerusalem and of the affairs of the Al-Aqsa Mosque, gave Curry and the group a tour of both the mosque and the Dome of the Rock. They also visited a museum in the complex.Presiding Bishop Michael Curry, right, walks March 29 with Anglican Archbishop in Jerusalem Suheil Dawani, left, and Mohammed Azam Al-Khatib, director general of the Department of Awqaf Jerusalem and of the affairs of the Al-Aqsa Mosque, from the Dome of the Rock (in the background) to the mosque. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceMuslims believe that the Prophet Muhammad ascended from the site. They call it the Miraculous Night Journey, and it is commemorated in the architectural wonder known as the Dome of the Rock shrine. The 35-acre compound, which is administered by Jordan, also includes the remains of the Western Wall of the Second Temple, the most important religious site for Jews. Over the centuries, various groups of people have been banned from the site, depending on who controlled it.Al-Khatib gave Curry and his group a summary of the recent conflict between Muslims, Christians and Jews over the site.In the end, “as Muslims we have full respect for the Jews, because of their religion. We respect it,” Al-Khatib insisted, with the Most Rev. Suheil Dawani, the Anglican archbishop in Jerusalem, acting as translator. The problem, he said, is not the Jewish people, but is instead with “the politicians who are trying to impose their ideas on this place.”Al-Khatib said Muslim and Christian holy sites are under attack, both through violence and via laws such as the recent struggle over an onerous Jerusalem Municipality taxation plan. For centuries, religious bodies in the city have been exempt from such taxes, but the municipality is now demanding millions from religious groups as part of an ongoing dispute with Israel’s finance ministry. He called this an “extremist and radical position.”The Times of Israel recently reported that the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem has been hit with a bill of the equivalent of nearly $2 million. Al-Khatib said Muslim religious groups would owe $120 million. Even though the controversial plan was put on hold earlier this month, the diocese’s accounts are still frozen.“We’ve been attacked by this government,” Al-Khatib said. “It seems there are no wise people in Israel.”Al-Khatib contended that for 1,500 years, there was “much tolerance and mutual understanding” between Christian and Muslims. “We lived together as one family,” he said, adding later that “it seems Israel does not like to see this kind of relationship between Muslims and Christians.”He asked Curry to do what he could to work for peace in Jerusalem.“This is what Jerusalem needs: a just peace for everybody and to stop any religious wars here,” he said. “We don’t want any religious wars here. We don’t need war. We want to live in peace and harmony with everybody.”Shoes belonging to Presiding Bishop Michael Curry and those traveling with him wait outside the Al-Aqsa Mosque. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceCurry greeted Al-Khatib in the name of “your brothers and sisters in the Episcopal Church.”“Following the lead of our brother and archbishop,” he said, gesturing to Dawani, who sat between them, “our church stands with you and with him for what is just and right.”The presiding bishop said the Episcopal Church knows that Jordanian King Abdullah II “is a man of peace.”“We will share your message and the story you have told with our people back home,” Curry said. “I was raised to believe that God made all people to be equal and all people to be free. Growing up as an African-American in America, the work for freedom and justice is deep in my bones.”Later at the traditional Holy Week Chrism Mass, Dawani said in his sermon that Curry’s visit had “empowered us here in this land, especially in the difficult and challenging time we face.”Clergy must preach God’s word to all, as well as to heal and teach, trying to transform the world the way Christ did, Dawani said.“Being one of God’s ministers, we are used to the having the eyes of our parishes, and our parishes, our communities and also our traditions fixed on us, especially here in this land where we deal with so many governments,” the archbishop told the clergy. The Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem is spread over five countries — Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Palestine and Syria. The challenge, he said, is to know how to deal with each of those governments “to keep the balance among all the governments of this region.”Clergy in the Holy Land have “a public role to proclaim Christ’s love to all humankind,” Dawani said. “This can lead us into difficult situations: situations when we feel we have to speak when everyone else is silent; situations when we have to be silent when everyone else is speaking; situations when we have to stand up for justice, when everyone else seems to go along with the crowd.”Dawani said Anglicans must discern “how we carry Christ’s message at this difficult time in the midst of all the hardships and all the difficulties and how we stand up for our rights in order that the witness will continue, and our presence will be empowerment.”Deacons and clergy of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem gather March 29 with Anglican Archbishop in Jerusalem Suheil Dawani and Presiding Bishop Michael Curry after the traditional Holy Week Chrism Mass. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceClergy typically renew their ordination vows during the Chrism Mass, and Dawani said the question his clergy ought to consider while doing so is whether “we are able to have the courage to speak such words of truth, to speak up when all around us are silent. Are we prepared to take the risk for Christ by standing up for those around us who are downtrodden?”The archbishop noted that the Anglican Jewish Commission recently met in Jerusalem to discuss migration and immigration, what he called “the most challenging issue at this time.” Dawani criticized, most especially, “politicians who cause all these troubles and cause innocent people to suffer because of their agendas, because they’re asking for more richness, they’re asking for more oil.”“We discussed how we should deal with the stranger in our midst; how we are to welcome those who are different to us,” he said. He said the Christians at the meeting “became passionate about this,” recalling the parable of the Good Samaritan. “In our ministry, in our offering services to the people who are in need, we don’t differentiate. Black, white, Jewish, Christian, Muslims, we help those who are in need in the name of our Lord, Jesus Christ.”Living in a land with three religions, Dawani said he knows “sometimes the political situation affects our relationships, but we should put politics aside” and remember that all people are made in the image of God, “whether he be a Christian, a Muslim or a Jew.”Later in the afternoon, the presiding bishop and his group also had a strategic conversation about peace building with Yusef Daher, executive secretary of the Jerusalem Inter-Church Center and Zoughbi Zoughbi, local program coordinator for the Ecumenical Accompaniment Program in Palestine and Israel.Curry was in the sixth day of a Holy Week pilgrimage to the Holy Land. Previous ENS coverage of his travels can be found here. Dawani invited Curry to make this Holy Week pilgrimage.The presiding bishop is accompanied by the Rev. Charles Robertson, canon to the presiding bishop for ministry beyond the Episcopal Church; the Rev. Margaret Rose, Episcopal Church deputy for ecumenical and interfaith relations; the Rev. Robert Edmunds, Episcopal Church Middle East partnership officer; and Sharon Jones, Curry’s executive coordinator.– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is interim managing editor of the Episcopal News Service. Tony Oberdorfer says: Ecumenical & Interreligious, Press Release Service Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Rector Bath, NC Submit a Job Listing New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Shreveport, LA center_img Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Mar 29, 2018 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Tampa, FL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Knoxville, TN The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Comments (1) Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Washington, DC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Collierville, TN Maundy Thursday commandment reveals new depth, challenges in Holy Land today ‘We must find ways to work for the peace of Jerusalem,’ Presiding Bishop says Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Martinsville, VA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Presiding Bishop 2018 Holy Land pilgrimage, Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Tags Rector Albany, NYlast_img read more