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How do I move from a bad job?

first_imgHow do I move from a bad job?On 12 Feb 2002 in Personnel Today After only a short period in a new job I realise I have made a bad careermove. I am becoming increasingly aware of poor practices in my organisation.Would potential employers look unfavourably on a such a short-term period ofwork, and how would I explain my reasons for wanting to leave at an interviewwithout being too negative about the organisation and breaking confidences?Another facet to this, in such an organisation how does an HR manager maintainher professional qualification while seemingly turning her back on such poorpractices? Claire Coldwell, consultant, Chiumento This is an unfortunate experience, but use it to really think about yourvalues and what type of company you will be happiest to work for in the future.Before you make a hasty departure, you might try to raise your concernssensitively with your immediate manager and give some suggestions as to how youwould improve things. If this is one of a succession of short-term moves thenit may send out warning signals about your staying power; a single glitch isunlikely to be viewed badly. Having thought through what you’ve learnt from this, be straight withpotential employers that your experience did not match the picture you got atyour interview. Talk about your achievements and skills you have learnt in your position.The experience will provide better understanding of what you should be lookingout for with prospective employers. Next time use interviews to get as muchinformation as possible so you make the right next move. Clive Sussams, recruitment consultant, Malpas This is not a unique problem and many people have probably had oneunexpected and unfortunate job experience during the course of their career. You must consider whether you feel you can influence the poor practiceswhich exist. Clearly your career prospects would be better if you had a solidand consistent progression of jobs with reasonable service. If you do not believe your present company or attitude of senior managementcan change, you appear to have no option other than to look for anotherposition. It would look better on your CV if you stayed for approximately ayear as this would give a potential employer the impression you were committedenough to see whether the situation would change and what efforts you made toinitiate change. If you decide you have to leave now I would advise that you should behave aspositively as possible at interviews. Do not create negative feelings aboutyour current employer as this will be detrimental to you. Warren Green, director, EJ Human Resources If you have a fairly stable career background and this is the only positionyou have been in for a short period, then there is less to worry about than ifyou have a record of brief employment. I don’t think there is anything wrongwith telling prospective employers you felt uncomfortable with some of thethings you were asked to do. You should try and give examples of how you triedto change these practices and attempted to introduce new ideas and methods. Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos. Comments are closed. last_img read more

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Speaker predicts rude awakening for HR profession

first_imgRelated posts:No related photos. Speaker predicts rude awakening for HR professionOn 21 May 2002 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Half of what HR does is a waste of time because HR directors focus too muchon process rather than making a difference in their organisations, delegatesheard. Ellis Watson, managing director of Celador International told HR directors theyneed to make a step change to survive as a function, in a challengingpresentation peppered with expletives. “HR is not to do with process – it’s an important part of it, but it’sabout influencing everyone else,” Ellis argued. Together with Tim Drake of the Drake Consultancy, Ellis urged HR people tobe passionate, take risks and become the internal brand leader in theirorganisations. Ellis said HR directors were unlikely to win a place on the board as thefunction was rarely important enough in most organisations. Ellis added that chief executives who didn’t inspire people should not be inthe role. Drake told HR directors they should focus on making allies with other seniorexecutives, get rid of poor performers and concentrate on their personaldevelopment. Ellis reinforced the message that HR should manage out poor performers.”Crap people can be sacked,” he said, “sacking people is a pieceof p*** if you want to do it. Bad people are a cancer, they are a disease, theyare AIDS,” he added. Comments are closed. last_img read more

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Broadening your horizons

first_img Comments are closed. Companiesare losing business simply because they fail to recognise their internationalpartners have a different way of working. Pepi Sappal looks at how this cultural hurdle can be overcomeJusta few months ago, SwissAir HR director Matthias Molloney complained thatfinding leaders with global skills and multicultural experience to help expandthe business internationally, was extremely difficult. “We’re not justlooking for languages, but transnational thinking. People with these qualities,however, are a scarce commodity,” says Molloney. It’sa common complaint. Although international companies have been around for manyyears, cultural nuances still get in the way of doing business. “Westill hear tales about Westerners walking away from meetings under theimpression that a deal has been struck between them and, say, their Easterncounterparts, but they are often shocked to discover that there’s actually nodeal when they arrive home, and can’t understand what went wrong,” saysRichard Little, international consultant at UK-based training firm Impact.”The problem, it seems, is that we’re still struggling to produceinternational managers capable of dealing with cross-cultural dilemmas. Thismakes it difficult to reach business goals and profit targets, whether theyarise from cross-border alliances or within international teams.”Arecent study by professional services firm KPMG confirms that relationalaspects of cultural differences and lack of trust are responsible for as muchas 70 per cent of all cross-border alliance failures. And HR directors and CEOscontinue to complain that cross-border alliances and acquisitions just haven’tbrought the results they expected.Businessguru Fons Trompenaars of Netherlands-based cross-cultural firm THT Consulting,and co-author of Riding The Waves of Culture, blames this inability to producemanagers capable of conducting successful international business on trainingand old-fashioned attitudes. “Global corporations have learned that the‘we’re all the same strategy – by standardising business processes worldwide’,doesn’t work. They’ve also discovered that the ‘we’re all different, so let’screate different processes to accommodate for local nuances’ scenario justcreates chaos,” says Trompenaars.”Thistime round, it’s about ‘finding a common or middle ground’ that works for allparties by leveraging on the values we share. And the sooner companies comeround to that way of thinking, the better,” he says.Hebelieves sending managers on short courses that do little more that point outthe differences simply isn’t enough to succeed in today’s complicatedinternational business arena. “This approach can often make conflictresolution far more difficult. So it’s imperative to find courses that look atthe similarities too,” he says. “Only then can managers find middleground that everyone will be happy to work within.” He describes thisskill as the ‘transcultural competency’ – the ability to not only recognise andunderstand differences, but reconcile them and leverage them for businessadvantage. ProfessorFred Seidel, of French business school EM Lyon, agrees. “As companies goglobal, you need managers that are able to build a bridge between their ownculture and others,” he says. “To do this, they need to understandthe differences, then look at where they can build commonalities in order towork with their international colleagues effectively,” says Seidel.”This way no one culture dominates another, which is where conflictsusually arise.”Yetskilled ‘transcultural managers’, capable of finding ‘a common ground’ arerare. But it’s not all bad news. Trompenaars claims that this transculturalmindset can be learned, and once mastered, can be transferred from one countryor culture to another with ease. That said, it’s not something that can belearnt overnight, but acquired through a combination of training courses andpersonal developmental skills.”Globalmanagers must acquire cultural sensitivity and savvy at two levels: genericunderstanding independently of the countries involved (cross-culturalpreparation) and country-specific understanding of the dos and don’ts ofbusiness etiquette and practice (country preparation),” says Lisbeth Claus,professor of international HR at the Monterey Institute of InternationalStudies in California.”Ashort cross-cultural course will help acquire a generic cross-culturalunderstanding. This will give an insight to how cultures differ, based on theworks of cross-cultural gurus such as Trompenaars and Geert Hofstede. Forexample, they will learn how other cultures value life. Is it an individualistculture like the US, or a collective one like Japan. Once they have that kindof knowledge they will find it easier to manage and reconciledifferences.” Claushas developed a Transcultural Competency Toolkit to help understand these basicdifferences. It helps to compare cultures and increase cultural savvy ininternational business situations. “It allows firms to compare theimplications of say, offering an overseas promotion to say a British personfrom a highly individualistic culture and an Argentine person from acollectivist culture, which is also highly paternalistic.”Theconcept of ‘commonalities’ is also beginning to appear in short courses aswell. “Working on what we have in common is a strategy we use to buildrapport and an element of trust between, say, an international team,” saysPhilippe Nitzer, senior trainer at Farnham Castle, the UK-based internationalbriefing and conference centre. “One way we do this is through sharingemotions – such as fear, joy or excitement – that are common to everyone,through action or role play. This helps to develop a genuine trust betweeneveryone. Once this bond has been established, the differences don’t seem to betoo big, and they can then find a way to negotiate and work on theirdifferences.”Theoryalone, however, is not enough. Experiential learning, via exposure tointernational business through overseas assignments or working in multinationalteams, is also important. Through a combination of experiences andcross-cultural training, international managers will learn how to get the bestout of people, by knowing which buttons to press. To make a joint alliance betweenChina and the US work, for example, managers must adopt two differentapproaches to get them working together to reach the same goal. “Soto get the Americans on your side, you need to talk about future goals andobjectives, forecasting the type of return they would get as they arefuture-orientated,” says Claus. “But for the Chinese, who arepast-orientated, the way to get them on your side is by referring to historyand what their ancestors would have done, because that’s what they respect.”Thosebeing groomed for international leadership positions, however, will needfurther cross-cultural development and international training – usuallyacquired through a longer course, preferably at a business school. “Here,they’d get a deeper understanding of culture on top of international businessskills. For example, an understanding of institutions like education systemswill give a clue about the way certain cultures learn and solve problems,”says Seidel. “This can be done by analysing environments by looking atcompany growth patterns. For example, why the Japanese have been able to buildhuge organisations, whereas the Chinese haven’t. As the Chinese rarely trustpeople out of their own clan, their businesses tend to be smaller and familyowned. Again, this gives a clue as to just how trusting and loyal certaincultures are.”OngoingsupportOncemanagers acquire these skills, they will be able to go to any country and findtheir own way in business, claims Seidel. “They’ll be able to distinguishwhat is important and what isn’t. They’ll know how to go about finding theknowledge they need – and in many cases, eliminating the need for culturaltraining briefings each time they go to a new location, because they’ll knowwhat information they need and how to get it in order to adapt to the new workenvironment quickly and effectively.”Butit doesn’t stop there. Skills must be continuously topped up with just-in-timecountry-specific preparation and supporting skills. “It’s amazing how manyUS firms will acquire a European firm, thinking they can fire at will, likethey do in the US,” says Stephane Brahey, director of interculturalmanagement training, at Cendant International Assignment Services, based at theChicago office. “So firms send staff to us for tactical training, to helpprepare staff who are about to negotiate a joint venture in China, for example.We’ll give them an insight in to how deals are done there, help them understandthe legal implications, and so on, with ongoing coach and support along theway.”Theneed for transculturally competent managers will steadily increase, not onlyfor overseas postings, however, but on companies’ home countries as well.Considerable labour movement is occurring throughout the member states of theEuropean Union, and the face of the US domestic workforce is also becoming moremulticultural: Hispanics are likely to become the US’ largest minority group by2020, and according to the US Department of Labor, two-thirds of the USpopulation increase between now and 2050 will be due to immigration.Inshort, cross-cultural training is a time-consuming investment, and adapting toa broader view of bridging the cultural gaps a considerable commitment, forindividuals and companies alike. But long term, those investments pay off. AsFons Trompenaars points out: “Leaders such as Michael Dell and RichardBranson have this transcultural mindset that can deal with ambiguity. Not onlywill those who have this skill thrive in business, but so will those firms.”Cross-culturalsavvy and how to acquire itAcquiringcross-cultural savvy does not happen overnight, says Lisbeth Claus, professorof international HR at the Monterey Institute of International Studies inCalifornia. She offers some tips that can help HR and their staff increasecross-cultural skills within their organisations:–Make globalisation an integral part of your company’s mission. Increase globalawareness among your employees by communicating your global strategy, byeducating them about your international suppliers, customers and competitors.Help increase their understanding of global interdependence–Know your own culture: an in-depth knowledge of your own culture is aprerequisite to identifying and eliminating stereotypes about other cultures–Do not stereotype others: having a global mindset requires us to be flexibleand adaptable to change. Do not base assumptions about others on stereotypes,but on an understanding of a culture’s various value dimensions and howbusiness is conducted–Recruit staff with cross-cultural and language skills: an increasing number ofpotential employees already have an international background, education andexperience. It’s easy to teach new recruits about your business practices andindustry than it is to develop non-existent cultural and language skills–Promote people from different cultural backgrounds to management positions. Bydiversifying the cultural background of your managers, your company will beless likely to view the world solely from a domestic perspective–Provide opportunities for cross-cultural learning and languages. Consider theacquisition of cross-cultural and language skills as a part of your employees’personal development. Provide them with learning opportunities through education,training and international assignments. Working in a global environmentrequires people to become proficient in at least one additional language.Language acquisition is the basis of socialisation into a culture, and acompetitive advantage to conduct business better in that new environment–Learn from your international experiences: share the knowledge of yourinternational successes and failures with everyone so that everyone may learn–Shift your emphasis from short-term task accomplishment to long-termrelationship building. This will make it easier to conduct business incountries such as Asia and Latin America–Remember the global rule: treat people from other cultures as they would liketo be treated Broadening your horizonsOn 1 Jun 2002 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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Met recruits from most deprived areas

first_imgMet recruits from most deprived areasOn 7 Jan 2003 in Personnel Today Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos. Previous Article Next Article The Metropolitan Police has recruited 100 new staff from some of London’smost deprived communities through a new partnership scheme. The alliance between the Met, Jobcentre Plus and the London EmployerCoalition was designed to deal with unemployment in inner city areas and fillpositions within the service. A total of 36 people have now started work as communications officers, witha further 23 awaiting clearance to take up their positions. Another 42 areworking in traffic police or community support roles, with dozens more ready totake up posts. The three organisations devised a specialist work preparation programme andguaranteed an interview to all candidates that completed it. This means people applying do not need specific qualifications – making thejobs open to a wider audience and hopefully easier to fill. Secretary of State for Work and Pensions Andrew Smith said the partnershipwas an excellent example to other police forces and public sector employers ofhow to fill important vacancies and recruit people from areas of highunemployment. Commissioner Sir John Stevens, head of the Met, expects more candidates tocome through the scheme. “We have set ourselves extremely ambitiousrecruitment targets this year and partnerships such as this are an excellentway of matching the right people with the right skills to the right job.” The courses have so far been run in Lambeth, Southwark, Tower Hamlets, Brentand Haringey with 80 per cent of those interviewed getting a job. last_img read more

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Aid agency merger will help improve humanitarian efforts around the world

first_imgAid agency merger will help improve humanitarian efforts around the worldOn 22 Apr 2003 in Personnel Today HR professionals in the voluntary sector have welcomed a merger between twoaid agencies that provide staff to work in humanitarian emergencies such asIraq. The merger of the International Health Exchange (IHE), which specialises inhealth professionals, and RedR, which concentrates on engineers, logisticiansand managers, will provide charities with a ‘one-stop shop’ for recruiting andtraining aid workers. Annie Macklow-Smith, director of HR for the aid agency Merlin, which usesboth IHE and RedR, said the new organisation would help meet recruitment needsin the sector, which is gearing up to meet the post-war humanitarian crisis inIraq. “Engineers and health professionals are the people we recruit most, soto have them together is an advantage,” she said. Oxfam’s director of international HR, Andrew Thompson, agreed the mergerwould allow a more integrated approach to humanitarian work. Bobby Lambert, director of RedR, told Personnel Today that the twoorganisations were providing very similar services but with different groups ofstaff. Each maintain registers of professionals prepared to work in emergencies anddeliver training programmes for aid workers. “By merging, we become a one-stop shop for agencies, as well as for aidworkers who want professional development,” he said. The skills of health workers and engineers were complementary, he added. “If you look at Basra, the thing that affects health almost immediatelyis water and sanitation. That’s where you need both engineers and health professionalsworking together.” The merger comes as both organisations struggle for funds. Each has avariety of funding streams, including the Department for InternationalDevelopment, smaller grants and training fees. But many small agencies arecutting their training budgets as they come under pressure to keep downmanagement overheads. Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos. Previous Article Next Articlelast_img read more

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Briefing

first_img Comments are closed. A round-up of news from the professional journalsNurses put lives on line during epidemic Nurses put their lives on the line by caring for people during the SARSepidemic earlier this year, the International Council of Nurses (ICN) biennialcongress in Geneva has been told. In Taiwan, four nurses died, including twohead nurses and a director of nursing. A nurse in Canada also died. Nursing Standard, 14 July Women are worst affected by RA Women with rapid onset rheumatoid arthritis (RA) tend to deteriorate morequickly than men. A study reported in the Annals of Rheumatic Disease followed284 patients with recent onset RA for two years from diagnosis. Although themen and women in the study had similar average clinical status at onset, theresearchers found the men showed signs of more pronounced improvement and amore favourable disease course than the women, with regard to functionalabilities. Nursing Times, 13 July Link between cancer fatigue and anxiety Reducing cancer-related fatigue is significantly associated with reductionsin anxiety and depression in anaemic patients with lung cancer, according tonew research in the journal Cancer. A randomised, double-blind,placebo-controlled trial of darbepoetin alfa in the treatment of anaemiaevaluated changes in depression and anxiety levels and fatigue in 250 lungcancer patients. Nursing Times, 12 July                    Previous Article Next Article BriefingOn 1 Aug 2003 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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One of a kind

first_imgLastyear, Tammie Daly became the country’s first occupational health nurseconsultant and, to date, remains the only OHN in such a post. She explains herexperiences over the last year, what she has achieved in her job and her plansfor the future.  By  Nic PatonWhenTammie Daly became the country’s first occupational health nurse consultantlast year, she expressed the hope that her appointment would open the door forother OH professionals to become nurse consultants. But one year on, she isstill alone.“Itis very sad. I believe there are two or three areas that are looking to draw upthe papers to make a submission, but, yes, I am still the only one,” sheadmits.Dalytook up her new post in June last year, moving over from managing theNottingham City Hospital OH department – primarily a management role – tohaving a position that encompasses the Queen’s Medical Centre (where she is nowbased), City Hospital and Nottingham University.“Alot of what has happened over the past year has not been mega change, but thatis just the way things go. It is a gradual process, bringing about change,rather than a sudden blast,” she explains. TheNottingham OH team is a large one, including a clinical director, anotherconsultant, two specialist registrars, a nurse manager, four specialist OHnurses, two trainee OH nurses, and a team of OH nurse advisers, as well asclerical and administrative staff.Itserves about 18,000 NHS workers and provides a range of services to commercialorganisations and small- and medium-sized enterprises, something it has beendoing since well before the Government launched NHS Plus. “Wegive OH access to industries such as bakeries and foundries, and have beendoing so since the 1980s. We have some small garages that we go to just once ayear. It is getting quite difficult for small firms to get OH advice because anumber of the bigger organisations have stopped doing outside work, so we thinkit is important,” says Daly.“Butwe have to look after the NHS first, as that is our core service,” she adds.Inthe past year, Daly has seen the team take on yet more referrals and give outan ever-widening range of advice. The nurses now undertake BCG vaccinationclinics and she has helped to organise a back pain clinic with the Nottinghamspecialist back pain team.“Wehave one of them come into the department and run a clinic every Friday, sothat if someone is coming to us with any type of back pain, they can get expertadvice or we can refer them back into the correct system,” she says.TheOH team is also looking to work closely with the trust’s dermatology nurseconsultant. “We now have much closer links with the dermatology nurses, and weare able to share and update knowledge much better. We’re hoping to develop aformalised referral system, and there is going to be a meeting in September tothis end,” she adds.Becominga nurse consultant, she believes, has not substantially changed herrelationship with her trust management – which was always good – or herreputation within the trust, which, again, was always good. “They recognise OHis there to help the managers, so they are usually appreciative that we arethere to help,” she says. Perhapsthe biggest change for Daly has been moving from a role where the core functionof the job was the management of a single site to a combined clinical roleacross a number of sites. “Thishas probably been my biggest hurdle. When I was just running one department, Iknew exactly what was going on because I was looking after it. Now I am givingout expertise to, and working with, three different departments,” she explains.“Itis much easier to work in a single department where you know everyoneintimately. I know of nurse consultants who have simply been drawn back intothe management structures,” she says.Shehas a clinical commitment – it is one of the requirements of being a nurseconsultant – but Daly is also keen to try to step back and look at the serviceas a whole, with fresh eyes. “Ineed at least one day a week where I do clinical work, so I try to have a setday, as it is very easy to slip back into just doing management things, andfind you have lost the focus of being a nurse consultant,” she says.“Youneed to question why you are doing certain parts of your practice. You may bedoing basic health screening, but is that right for the individual? Could we bespending our time in a better way? Why are things being done this way?”Thisnurse consultant role brings with it extended responsibilities, too, bothwithin the trust and in the profession as a whole. Daly has found herselfworking much more closely with the Royal College of Nursing (RCN), offeringadvice and support on a wide range of areas.“Iam able to give advice to other people in different areas. I hope people willstart to get to know me and will know they can come to me. I think it isespecially important for nurses who are working alone, as it is nice to knowthere is someone you can call. It is an important part of my role as anadvocate for OH. Nottingham OH has always tried to do that to an extent, butyou have to do it while ensuring you do not let your own organisation suffer,”she explains.Goodexamples of Daly and the team providing support include the SARS outbreak andthe debate over smallpox immunisation, when she worked closely with both hertrust and the relevant authorities to provide OH-based advice.Anotherissue has been forging ever-closer ties with local GPs. The relationshipbetween GPs and OH professionals when it comes to sickness absence is movinginexorably closer, with many GPs even keen to pass sickness certification overto OH nurses.“IfGPs do not fully understand our role, and why should they, they cannot alwaysgive the best advice and that is what we are trying to do,” Daly argues.Shewould like to see more clarity emerging about the role of OH, particularly inrelation to GPs. “From the doctor’s point of view, there has to be clarityabout what the role is and how it is going to evolve.”Buther primary role has to be to her own team at Nottingham, acting as an OH guideand mentor. Among her qualifications, Daly has a masters degree in education,and passing on experience is, she considers, a primary function of anyeffective nurse consultant.“Myrole is to ensure the team is happy and working to the best of its ability,”she explains.“Partof that is helping other team members progress. I am trying to formalise thetraining needs much more, so that when staff attend conferences and training,they can provide me with feedback, so we can decide whether the organisationshould be changing practice. The feedback will also be passed on to the rest ofthe team if appropriate. I organise monthly training sessions for all nurses,and clerical staff can attend if content is suitable.“Itis about getting the staff away and giving them time to study, but still makingsure it is done in an appropriate way and with an appropriate member of theteam.”Forthe year ahead, Daly says she would like to see some more OH nurse consultantscome into the frame. “The OH speciality is very different from some of theother hospital-based nurse consultant roles, who have to deal with issues suchas bed allocation and waiting lists. So, it would be great to have someone elseto talk to in the OH field to bounce ideas off,” she says.Whileit may be lonely being the country’s only OH nurse consultant, it may not bewholly surprising either. The fact an OH nurse consultant position was createdwas in itself a message that, for the first time, clinical skills in OH were ofas much value as management skills when it came to career progression. It wasalso a recognition of the increasing importance NHS managers are putting on thehealth of the workforce, both that of the NHS and the people who come through thedoor as patients.Withinthis, inevitably, there are issues of funding. Because OH nurse consultantswill, most likely, like Daly, have been nurse managers, appointing a nurseconsultant effectively means finding the funding for two new roles, because thetrust will still need a nurse manager. Maybe this is why the pay is nowherenear the £45,000 often quoted.Perhaps,more importantly, though, there are issues of perception and education. Whatsort of OH nurse do NHS trusts want? What sort of qualifications should theyhave? What should be the extent of their role?WhileDaly may be blazing a trail, others are inevitably being more circumspect. “Theidea of an OH nurse consultant is still in its early days,” says Daly. “Peoplemay be waiting to see what happens.”Whatis the role of a nurse consultant?–Nurse consultant posts, first announced in 1999, are designed to offer nursesan alternative career track that does not mean they are forced to go intomanagement–They were created largely as a means of keeping experienced nurses in clinicalpositions, but by and large have gone to nurses in ‘frontline’ and acute carepositions–Those filling such posts, which command a salary of up to £45,000, are expectedto be experienced practitioners with advanced educational qualifications–They are expected to combine expert practice with professional leadershipskills, consultancy, education, service development, research and evaluation–Posts must include a firm commitment to keeping 50 per cent of the time availableto work directly with patients–To get a nurse consultant, a local organisation has to make the case for thepost; a request that then goes up through the regional office to the Departmentof Health, after which, if agreed, the post is advertised–The NHS Plan set a target of creating 1,000 nurse consultants by 2004 One of a kindOn 1 Oct 2003 in Personnel Today Comments are closed. 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Doctors hours limit could be disaster for UK’s health service

first_imgDoctors hours limit could be disaster for UK’s health serviceOn 2 Mar 2004 in Personnel Today NHS trusts are ill-prepared for new limits on junior doctor hours because ofa lack of Government support and confusion over the legislative details, aparliamentary inquiry has heard. Doctors’ leaders have informed a House of Lords inquiry that nationalguidance has failed to materialise on how trusts can cut junior doctors’ hoursto 58-per week – just months away from an August deadline. Under the Working Time Directive, junior doctors will be limited to working58 hours per week – equivalent to a 10 per cent drop in their total hours onaverage. But the British Medical Association (BMA) told the inquiry the England-widepilot schemes currently in place probably wouldn’t report in time to helptrusts meet their deadline. Dr Simon Eccles, chair of the BMA’s junior doctors committee, accused theDepartment of Health of being late on the uptake and said the pilot schemesshould have been launched two years ago. However, Elaine Way, president of the Association of Healthcare HR Managers,disagreed claiming there was “complete engagement of the HR community onthis”. The Social and Consumer Affairs Select Committee called for the inquiry aspart of a European Commission review of the Working Time Directive because ofconcerns that UK employers have been coercing staff into signing away theirrights. Member states have until 31 March to report back to the EC on whichaveraging periods should be used to calculate working weeks. Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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What real estate gets in Biden’s $1.9 trillion package

first_img Commercial Real EstateJoe BidenReal Estate and PoliticsResidential Real Estate Full Name* Share via Shortlink Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlink Message* Tags Here are five provisions noteworthy for the real estate industry:1. Rent and mortgage assistanceThe bill includes $21.55 billion for emergency rental assistance, $5 billion for emergency housing vouchers and $100 million for rural housing.It also provides funds for marginalized communities hurt by the coronavirus pandemic, such as $5 billion to help people experiencing homelessness and $750 million for Native American communities.Distribution will be handled by state and local governments and will vary.One measure the bill does not touch is the national eviction moratorium, which was recently extended through March. Its future after that is uncertain.2. Small businesses and restaurantsRestaurants (and their landlords) are among the big winners in the package, as $28.6 billion would go to eligible eateries in grants of up to $5 million.Restaurant owners would also be eligible for a $15 billion Emergency Injury Disaster Loan program, which provides long-term, low-interest loans. Businesses with 10 or fewer employees would be given priority.The package appropriates $7.25 billion to the Paycheck Protection Program, which has already disbursed more than $662 billion in forgivable loans. However, the bill does not extend the current application period, which is scheduled to close March 31.Most restaurateurs were relieved that a federal minimum-wage increase was dropped from the bill. Some states, including New York, already have a much higher minimum, but in those that do not, tipped staff can still be paid a base wage as low as $2.13 an hour.3. State and local reliefState and local governments are facing pandemic-induced budget shortfalls in the coming months and years, raising concerns among real estate interests that taxes would be jacked up to close the gap.But the Biden bill designates $350 billion to states, cities, tribal governments and U.S. territories to mitigate the impacts of the coronavirus pandemic.The bill also adds a $10 billion infrastructure program to help local governments with capital projects.The money takes pressure off lawmakers to raise property, income and transfer taxes, which affect migration patterns and to some extent business location decisions, and thus real estate values and rents.4. HomelessnessIn addition to the $5 billion for people experiencing homelessness, the bill provides $510 million for the FEMA Emergency Food and Shelter Program, which supports homeless services providers. That money may be used for overnight shelter, meals, one month’s rent and mortgage assistance and one month’s utility payments.5. Stimulus checksThe $1,400 payments that Americans have been patiently awaiting for months could arrive as soon as next week. Individuals making under $75,000 and couples filing jointly making under $150,000 would receive $1,400 per person. The bill also provides $1,400 per dependent.Smaller checks will go out to individuals making more than $75,000 and couples making more than $150,000, but the benefit phases out and reaches zero at $80,000 and $160,000, respectively.Meant to boost the economy, the checks make up roughly $400 billion of the package. The previous two stimulus checks have been correlated with increased retail spending, benefiting retailers and, indirectly, their landlords.Contact Sasha Jones Email Address* President Joe Biden’s American Rescue Plan was passed over the weekend. (Getty / Photo Illustration by Kevin Rebong for The Real Deal)From rent relief to aid for restaurants, the $1.9 trillion stimulus package has lots of goodies for real estate.President Joe Biden’s American Rescue Plan was passed Saturday by the Senate and is headed back to the House, which is expected to follow suit.Read moreNational eviction moratorium ruled unconstitutional, but remains in placeBiden to extend limits on evictions, foreclosuresLawmakers propose canceling restaurant rent, providing relief for landlordslast_img read more

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Observations of terrestrial locomotion in Antarctic seals

first_imgObservations are reported on the modes of terrestrial locomotion among Antarctic members of the Phocidae. An account is given of the sinuous (or “swimming”) type of progression found most developed in the crabeater seal Lobodon carcinophagus (Hombron and Jacquinot), and of its occurrence in the leopard seal Hydrurga leptonyx (Blainville). This type of movement has not been seen in the Weddell seal Leptonychotes weddelli Lesson, where the undulatory (caterpillar‐like) method is the normal locomotory pattern on land. The fore‐flippers are not used by the adult Weddell seal in terrestrial locomotion, but the pup does make some use of the fore‐flippers during the first 10 to 15 days of postnatal life. The locomotory patterns used by the elephant seal Mirounga leonina Linn, and the probable methods used by the Ross seal Ommatophoca rossi Gray, are noted. The observation that the harp seal Pagophilus groenlandicus (Erxleben) shows the sinuous type of movement under stress is recorded.last_img read more