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Running Tab on Raab Lawsuit Nears $275,000 in Ocean City

first_imgRead more on the cost of the case.Video Fails to Quell Costly Suit Between Doctor’s Wife and CopRead the complete text of Raab’s complaint.Read the complete text of the police reports.__________Sign up for OCNJ Daily’s free newsletter and breaking news alerts“Like” us on Facebook Download (PDF, 148KB) Home video surveillance shows the start of a confrontation between Monica Raab and Ocean City Patrolman Jesse Scott Ruch outside Raab’s home on West Atlantic Boulevard in May 2010.Ocean City’s insurer has now paid $274,331 to lawyers defending the city in a lawsuit related to a small garden trailer parked illegally on an Ocean City side street.With a settlement conference scheduled for Nov. 25 and a trial potentially to follow, the costs of the case could still increase exponentially.The ongoing lawsuit hinges on two accounts of what ensued after an Ocean City police officer started to write a ticket for the trailer in May 2010.West Atlantic Boulevard resident Monica Raab claims in a complaint filed in 2011 that she was permanently injured by an Ocean City patrolman, Jesse Scott Ruch, who was trying to handcuff her for no reasonable cause. Police reports suggest Raab was uncooperative, hysterical and a danger to her own safety.The case illustrates the high costs and high stakes of defending against a civil lawsuit in the court system. The city has offered settlements to end a number other high-profile lawsuits ($50,000 and $75,000 in age-discrimination suits against the Ocean City Beach Patrol, $13,131 in a suit related to use of a K-9 dog, $83,000 apiece to three men in a racial discrimination suit, for instance), and some members of the public have accused City Council of agreeing to pay out without putting up a fight.But the Raab case shows what potentially can happen when two parties cannot agree on a settlement.The city’s insurer has made 15 payments totaling $216,467.78 to one law firm (Barker, Scott, Gelfand and James of Linwood) to defend the city and another six payments totaling $57,863.31 to a different firm (Reynolds and Horn of Marlton) to defend the police officer as an individual, according to invoices provided by the Atlantic County Municipal Joint Insurance Fund (JIF). (Ocean City participates in the Atlantic County JIF even though it is a Cape May County town.)Citing video captured by Raab’s own home surveillance system, Ruch’s lawyer, John J. Bannan, asked U.S. District Court Judge Robert Kugler to dismiss Raab’s claims against the officer altogether.“A videotape capturing the events in question that quite clearly contradicts the version of the story told by the plaintiff permits a court to conclude that no reasonable jury could believe the plaintiff’s discredited account,” Bannan wrote in a court document arguing for summary judgment.Kugler granted only part of of Ruch’s motion in a decision published Aug. 7, 2014 (see full text of his opinion in PDF below). Kugler noted that the video does not show the alleged use of force or lack thereof — Ruch and Raab disappear from view on the video before he handcuffs her. Because the facts remain in dispute, a pre-trial summary judgment would be inappropriate, Kugler ruled.Kugler granted a separate motion for summary judgment from Michael Barker, defending the city on behalf of the Atlantic County JIF. Barker asked to have eight of the 11 claims against the City of Ocean City dismissed. The plaintiff has failed, for instance, to offer evidence that the Ocean City Police Department does not properly train its officers, Barker suggested in his motion. Two other claims already had been dismissed.Barker also has filed a motion to have the city reimbursed for its attorney fees. But the reverse could hold true if the case goes to trial and goes against Ocean City.“In certain types of litigation, plaintiff’s attorneys collect all of their legal fees if they can convince a jury of as little as $1 in damages,” Paul J. Miola, executive director to the Atlantic County JIF, said earlier this year. “That leads to outrageous situations where a jury awards the plaintiff $10,000 in damages and the attorney receives $250,000 in legal fees. This is on top of the legal fees the JIF has spent on defense.”But Miola said Ocean City and the JIF have been responsible in limiting the impact of lawsuits.“In actuality, lawsuits have a limited effect on Ocean City taxpayers, since we look at the total picture when evaluating member assessments from year to year,” he said. “That includes property, automobile, and workers compensation claims in addition to lawsuits. In fact, lawsuits comprise less than 20 percent of the dollars we set aside for funding total claims in the Joint Insurance Fund.”Ocean City will budget $1.6 million for workman’s compensation in 2014 but only $796,872 for general liability (a budget item that includes but is not limited to lawsuit assessments). That’s up from $644,222 in 2013, $520,111 in 2012 and $449,824 in 2011.last_img read more

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The Show Goes on at Somers Point’s Gateway Playhouse

first_imgBy Maddy VitaleKeith Cooper got his wish in August, when the curtain went up on the first performance at the Gateway Playhouse in Somers Point after nine years of more drama and suspense in making it happen than in any show ever featured at the theater.“Nine years ago, I was just leaving Broadway,” Cooper, executive director of The Theater Collaborative of South Jersey, said in a recent interview. “I came home from New York to my house in Mays Landing, and some people asked if I could help them save the building.”James Dalfonso, president of the playhouse’s board of directors, was one of those people who called on Cooper.“It was a constant struggle to fund-raise. It was slow and difficult,” Cooper remembered. “We would get a little donation here and there, with dollars in a bowl at Bayfest, to some larger donations. We kept going. Now we’re here and it’s happening.”The labor of love seems to be well worth it as Cooper proudly showed off the extensive renovations, pointing to tiles he said make the acoustics fantastic to cushy, sizable seating for 220 patrons, and the latest sound and lighting systems.Keith Cooper, executive director of the playhouse, shows how to work sound equipment.There is also a bonus area upstairs where members of the orchestra can play so the space in front of the stage is freed up for seating. There is even a closed off walkway behind the stage with doors, so the actors and performers can enter and exit as quickly and quietly as possible.The building isn’t large, although Cooper couldn’t say for sure the exact dimensions. Certainly, it is an intimate space.“We try and maximize the space,” he said.Renovations to the 112-year-old building topped $1.2 million over nine years. Cooper said the theater closed in 2006 because the building was not up to code. Grants, such as Hurricane Sandy relief funds, helped make it possible to re-open, along with generous donations and support from the community.Fast forward to months of shows since Gateway Playhouse reopened on Aug. 19.“We’ve been busy. The past five months have been exciting and exhausting,” Cooper said.Tickets to a show range from $25 to $35 and can be purchased at the door, online or on the phone.Families can enjoy musicals, dramas, symphonies and other performances at a fraction of the cost of going to Philadelphia or New York for a show.From its grand opening through the past five months, Gateway Playhouse had a full lineup of productions, including “She Loves Me,” “Marvin & Me,” “Shade” and “Our Town.” Its current production, “Home for the Holidays,” is replete with ’50s era costumes, décor and music.Colorful 1950s-era style costumes with taffeta adorned the actors for a performance of “Home for the Holidays.”Some cross-promotions the playhouse is doing in partnership with community businesses are helping both groups.“Home for the Holidays” was Dec. 15 through Dec. 17. Patrons had their choice of 15 percent off their order at one of the participating local restaurants, including Gregory’s, The Anchorage, Tavern on the Bay and Doc’s Place. There is also ample, free public parking in two lots adjacent to the theater.“The whole community has been so supportive of us, the mayor and council and the local businesses,” Cooper said. “The idea is that you can get a cocktail before a show at a local restaurant, or dinner after. It’s a way to drive business to the whole community.”Gateway rents space for productions. While the theater is on the small side, on average, there is room for a cast of up to about 20 performers.To help the theater with its operating costs, Cooper said donations are appreciated.“We can always use more microphones, or lighting instruments. The best thing people can do to help is donate funds,” he said. “We always need to replace something. There is always something else we need.”Karen Sutherland, like Cooper, is a staple at the theatre. Like Cooper, she performed on Broadway and also performs in some of Gateway’s shows. The two work together, to make sure everything runs smoothly.“A lot of hard work went into this and continues to,” said Sutherland, Cooper’s assistant. “We are just so excited.”The feeling of accomplishment comes from a great show, and a parking lot filled with theater patrons.“We have a lot of great talent,” Cooper said. “I think the community is starting to catch on now that we’ve been here for five months. We need a good, solid year under our belt. This has been a wonderful start.”While there isn’t a season subscription being offered yet, Cooper hopes to have one to present to the public before the new year. And while he didn’t name any productions set to perform yet, he said there are some amazing shows they are considering.For more information or to purchase tickets to Gateway Playhouse, 738 Bay Ave., visit www.gatewaybythebay.org or call 609-653-0553.The show “Home for the Holidays” was a hit with families. (Photo courtesy of Gateway Playhouse) After nine years of renovations the Gateway Playhouse, 738 Bay Ave. in Somers Point, opens. (Photo courtesy of Gateway Playhouse)last_img read more

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Younger students more likely to be prescribed ADHD medications

first_imgBeing younger than one’s classmates affects academic performance throughout childhood and into puberty and increases children’s risk of being prescribed stimulants for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), according to a study from the University of Iceland and Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) published November 19, 2012 in Pediatrics. In the study of standardized test scores and medical records for nearly 12,000 Icelandic students aged 9 to 12, students in the youngest one-third of their class were 50% more likely than older peers to be prescribed ADHD medications. Overall, girls performed better academically than boys and were less frequently treated for ADHD than boys.“Age should be considered when evaluating children for an ADHD diagnosis and a prescription of a stimulant such as Ritalin,” senior author Sonia Hernández-Diaz, associate professor of epidemiology at HSPH, said in a November 23, 2012 Boston Globe article. “Parents and teachers need to be aware that kids may just be acting their age if they’re nearly a year younger than some of their peers and are struggling a bit emotionally and academically.”Read the Boston Globe articleRead the Pediatrics abstractlast_img read more

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Board seeks Foundation applicants

first_img Board seeks Foundation applicants The Board of Governors is seeking applicants for the following vacancies to be filled during its February 17, 2006, meeting: Florida Bar Foundation Board of Directors: Two lawyers to serve three-year terms, commencing July 1, 2006, on this 31-member Board of Directors which administers Florida’s IOTA program. Directors shall be members of the Foundation during their term(s) as directors.Persons interested in applying for this vacancy may download and complete the application online from the Bar’s Web site, www.floridabar.org, or may call Bar headquarters at (850)561-5600, extension 5757, to obtain an application form. Completed applications must be submitted to the Executive Director, The Florida Bar, 651 East Jefferson Street, Tallahassee 32399-2300 no later than close of business, Friday, January 20, 2006. Resumes will not be accepted in lieu of an application. Board seeks Foundation applicants January 1, 2006 Regular Newslast_img read more

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How to empower your staff

first_img 20SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,John Pettit John Pettit is the Managing Editor for CUInsight.com. John manages the content on the site, including current news, editorial, press releases, jobs and events. He keeps the credit union … Web: www.cuinsight.com Details While there will always be leaders and followers, a great employee is one who can do both. Your challenge as a leader is to empower your employees to perform with excellence and tackle challenges without the need for constant direction. Here are some ways you can empower your staff.Be supportive: You can be supportive without micro-managing and peering over your employees’ shoulders all day. Give employees direction as they fail, and help mold them into future leaders who will one day lead their own staff to make independent choices.Hold them accountable: One of the most important things about letting employees take the reins, is giving them the opportunity to learn from their mistakes. Holding employees accountable for their own actions will improve both effort and results. Treating all of your employees’ failures the same way will help motivate them to make a habit of being successful.Get on the same page: Your business relies on employees taking a project from beginning to end. Sometimes employees only have a small role in a project and can’t see the importance of every little detail. Openness in your organization should include letting your team have a glimpse at the big picture so they can see how all of the small parts work together to complete the overall goal. When everyone is on the same page, your team’s work is far more effective.last_img read more

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Tainted pepper found in home of Salmonella patient

first_imgJul 29, 2008 (CIDRAP News) – After more than 1,300 cases of Salmonella infection in 43 states over 3 months, investigators have finally found a smoking gun: a contaminated jalapeno pepper from the home of a Colorado resident who was sickened in the outbreak.The jalapeno tainted with the outbreak strain, Salmonella enterica serotype Saintpaul, was provided by a patient from Montezuma County, the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) announced yesterday. The county is in the state’s southwestern corner.”The pepper was purchased at a local Wal-Mart, likely on June 24, and the individual became ill on July 4,” the agency said in a news release. “This is the first pepper linked directly to an ill person in this outbreak.”Previously investigators had found the outbreak pathogen in a jalapeno at a Texas produce distributor but had not found it in any produce from the homes of patients.The Colorado announcement came yesterday as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported that the outbreak had increased to 1,304 cases in 43 states, plus Washington, DC, and Canada. Thirty-seven people became ill this month, and the latest reported illness onset date was Jul 12, the CDC said. The epidemic peaked in May.Tomatoes were long suspected as the cause of the outbreak, which was first publicized in early June, and investigators still have not excluded them as the possible cause of some early cases. But on the basis of investigations of several restaurant-related case clusters, suspicion fell on jalapeno and Serrano peppers early in July.On Jul 9 the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) warned that vulnerable groups, including the elderly, infants, and people with weakened immunity, should not eat raw jalapeno or Serrano peppers. Eight days later, the agency dropped its weeks-old warning against eating certain types of tomatoes. On Jul 21 the FDA announced that a jalapeno contaminated with the outbreak strain had been found at a distributor in McAllen, Tex.On Jul 25 the agency cleared US-grown peppers of blame for the outbreak but said consumers should continue to avoid eating raw jalapeno peppers from Mexico. The FDA also said people in high-risk groups should continue to avoid raw Serrano peppers grown in Mexico.See also: Jul 28 Colorado Department of Health news releasehttp://www.cdphe.state.co.us/release/2008/072808.htmlCDC update on the outbreakhttp://www.cdc.gov/salmonella/saintpaul/FDA Salmonella outbreak pagehttp://www.fda.gov/oc/opacom/hottopics/tomatoes.html#newslast_img read more

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Sanofi more confident about its coronavirus vaccines

first_imgTopics : “Our confidence has increased. We have work to do like everybody on manufacturing in large volumes. But we will have one, maybe two vaccines next year,” Hudson said.Translate Bio said on Tuesday the mRNA vaccine had induced an immune response in non-human studies, with trials in humans expected to start in November.Sanofi has secured deals for the vaccine-plus-adjuvant with the United States and Britain, and is in advanced talks with the European Union to supply it with up to 300 million doses.But the EU is offering only partial protection to vaccine makers against legal risks from side-effects of their potential shots, European officials said earlier this week, in a move that is hampering deals and contrasts with U.S. policy.”I think with the level of protection, we have reached an ‘agreed level’. And I think that has allowed us to go forward and sign. But I am aware there are different positions on how strong that is,” Hudson said.With vaccines being developed at record speed during the pandemic, there is potentially a greater risk they may have unexpected consequences or may not be effective.The financial coverage of these liabilities is a key feature of drugmakers’ talks with governments keen to secure vaccine shots in advance.There is so far no approved coronavirus vaccine, except one authorized in Russia before large-scale trials. The other, being developed with U.S. company Translate Bio , relies on a different technology known as mRNA.”The early data is saying that we’re on the right track and that we have a vaccine,” Paul Hudson said in an interview on Friday, referring to the vaccine being developed with GSK.That vaccine is set to start clinical trials next month.Around 30 experimental coronavirus shots are already in human trials. But Hudson said in June the probability of Sanofi obtaining a vaccine with an efficacy of more than 70% was higher than for rivals, in part due to its experience in vaccines.center_img Sanofi’s confidence in its coronavirus vaccine candidates has increased this summer as the French drugmaker prepares to start clinical trials, its chief executive told Reuters.The company is working on two of the more than 150 potential vaccines being developed across the world to tackle the COVID-19 pandemic, which has claimed more than 831,000 lives and sparked economic chaos.One candidate, to be manufactured on the back of an existing platform that develops vaccines to treat flu, will use an adjuvant made by Britain’s GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) to boost its efficacy.last_img read more

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The Queensland homes that are getting our attention this week

first_imgThe stunning interior of 36 Southern Cross Drive.The third most viewed home for the week is a Georgian-inspired stunner in the acreage Brisbane suburb of Chandler. Outside 102 Cobb Road.The home is designed to embrace the space that the 3012 sqm block offers with features including ensuites in two of the bedrooms, four living areas and six metre wide stacker doors. More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus19 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market19 hours agoA bit of old world charm inside 102 Cobb Road.It is listed through Century 21 North Lakes as an express sale.Over on the Gold Coast a waterfront mansion on the exclusive Coronis Island was the second most viewed of the week.On a street filled with stunning mansions, 36 Southern Cross Drive still manages to stand out with its triple garage, internal elevator, granite benchtops, spotted gum timber floors and limestone and travertine tiles. If you think this looks fancy, just wait till you see inside.With 901 sqm of floor space, 652 London Road has a number of high-end additions including Spanish Crema Merfil marble flooring, French doors, cold room and a wine cellar. 36 Southern Cross Drive Surfers Paradise could be the perfect party pad.It will cost you though, with the listing through NGU Real Estate calling for offers between $4.8 and $5 million. center_img ELEGANT STYLE: A euro-styled mansion got a lot of attention online.AN EXPANSIVE Hamptons style home outside of Brisbane was the most viewed Queensland property on realestate.com.au for the week.The five-bedroom home at 102 Cobb Road in Burpengary, between Brisbane and the Sunshine Coast, has a spacious 518 sqm floor plan as well as an elegant design. Told you.The elegance continues outside with a water fountain, manicured gardens and a 20 metre lap pool.It is listed now through Place Bulimba.last_img read more

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Low returns to persist, challenge fund managers – Credit Suisse AM

first_imgThe third is the period from 2008, with the collapse of Lehman Brothers and the subsequent sovereign debt crisis.Where we are now is “strangely familiar”, according to Wilmot. The prevailing low bond yields in the major developed countries, for example, should not be a surprise given that the history of the other crises has shown that nominal bond yields keep falling throughout the subsequent recovery period.For the next 7-10 years or perhaps longer, therefore, investors can expect zero real returns from developed market bonds and 4-6% from equities as “good working assumptions”, according to Wilmot.A typical mixed portfolio of bonds and stocks will deliver 1-3% per annum, in comparison with the nearly 10% p.a. on offer over the past seven years, he said.“That is a pretty challenging prospect for baby boomers and fund managers,” he told event attendees. It makes very important the question of whether excess return can be achieved through active management, he added.The “persistence of fragility” following major financial crises also raises the question of whether the Fed is making a policy mistake akin to that made by the central bank in 1937. In 1937, the Fed raised interest rates to stem an outflow of gold, precipitating what can also be seen as the second of back-to-back recessions at the time rather than one Great Depression, according to Wilmot.“If we’re making a 1937-style mistake, it could be a big one,” he said, but he warned against expecting a “literal re-rerun”.The persistent fragility of the economic and financial system, as well as investor and business confidence, are reasons to doubt whether December’s rate hike by the Fed is the beginning of a standard hiking cycle, he added.Others are also sceptical about assuming more tightening from the Fed as a given.Peter Hensman, global strategist at Newton Investment Management, said: “The US is as likely to restart stimulus as it is to raise rates through the year.“I suggest the Fed should look at recent comments made by former Bank of England governor Mervyn King about what history now views as the Swedish central bank’s (Riksbank) error in raising rates in 2010-11 and then having to sharply reverse direction after inflation remained below its target.”The Fed could make the same mistake, if it has not already, added Hensman, citing the instability of Chinese equity markets and the increasingly permanent “so-called ‘transitory’ declines in energy prices”.,WebsitesWe are not responsible for the content of external sitesLink to Credit Suisse Global Investment Returns Yearbook 2016 The history of the “great crises of capitalism” suggests there is an “all too real” risk of the US Federal Reserve making a policy mistake like that of 1937, and that investors should expect low returns from bonds and equities for a decade or more, according to Jonathan Wilmot, head of macroeconomic research at Credit Suisse Asset Management.Wilmot was speaking at an event in London to present the 2016 edition of the Credit Suisse Global Investment Returns Yearbook, to which he contributed a chapter on ‘When bonds aren’t bonds anymore’.Wilmot outlined the market environment investors and the fund management industry could expect to face in the coming years on the basis of the previous “great crises of capitalism”.These were in the 1890s, featuring a Latin American debt crisis, global panic and recession, and the 1930s Great Depression, according to Wilmot. last_img read more

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ClassNK grants AiP for Kawasaki’s LNG-fueled bulker design

first_imgClassification society ClassNK granted approval in principle (AIP) to Kawasaki Heavy Industries (KHI) for the concept design of an LNG-fuelled 207,000-DWT bulk carrier.With the International Maritime Organization (IMO) imposing tighter restrictions on emissions of greenhouse gases and air pollutants, the shipping industry has been increasing its focus on utilizing LNG in place of conventional fuel oil.In its statement, KHI noted that configuring the LNG fuel tank behind the accommodation in the stern, the ship keeps its cargo space as large as that of conventional oil-fueled ships.ClassNK noted in its statement that the AiP was granted based on its Rule Part GF which adopts IGF Code (regulation for ships using low-flashpoint fuels).Kawasaki has been developing various LNG-related vessels, such as the world’s first LNG-fueled car carrier, delivered in 2016, and LNG bunkering vessels, garnering LNG-related application technology.In addition to the additional technological innovations developed during the course of acquiring AiP for this bulk carrier, Kawasaki said it is fully equipped to proceed with its design and building, as well as to apply these technologies to other types of ships.Moving forward, Kawasaki plans to widen its application of LNG propulsion technology in commercial vessels and to increase its focus on building LNG-fueled vessels, for which demand is expected to grow globally in the future.last_img read more