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Welcome to Bakers Review!

first_imgFrom 30 January British Baker will be publishing Bakers Review in partnership with the National Association of Master Bakers (NAMB).Bakers Review will feature once a month within the pages of British Baker, covering the latest industry, legislation and regulation news as well as general advice on issues affecting craft bakery businesses.This means that British Baker will be the only magazine to target bakers and bakery buyers in craft, wholesale, plant, supermarkets, convenience stores, coffee shops and foodservice.The NAMB has been representing the interests of the craft baking industry throughout England and Wales for over a century.last_img

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Make more of malt

first_imgThe UK baking industry faces mounting pressure to reduce costs. Pressure is coming from the consumer and the retailer, but equally importantly, pressure is coming from within its own organisation to ensure survival in these difficult times. Finding ways to reduce costs and make more profit are key drivers.PremiumisationIn developed countries, more and more consumers want quality and luxury, for which they are willing to pay a higher price. They are not just interested in having what they perceive as an everyday treat; they are now looking for a real indulgence as a reward for dealing with the growing pressures of 21st-century living. This trend has been coined “premiumisation”.Research*, recently carried out by an independent market research company on behalf of Muntons, clearly showed that consumers perceive products with the word malt included in the title to be of a higher quality than non-malted equivalents. And they understand that they have to pay more too. Adding malt to a product, to the ingredients declaration and, importantly, to the product title, will bring benefits to the product and also increase consumer desirability. Products with malt in the title can carry a price premium without impacting negatively on consumer demand. The extra cost of including some malt in the recipe is much less than the extra revenue generated by the higher price of the retail product. Customers will taste the difference too.Compare, for example, malt whisky with blended whisky, malt vinegar with “non-brewed condiment” and a standard white loaf with a malted loaf. Which is better and which products carry a premium price? The malted versions cost more, but consumers are happy to pay, because they offer better quality and the taste is superior; the malted version is seen to be a better product. Achieving market premiumisation is also possible by simply adding another flavoured version of an existing product to your range. This strategy is often seen as a form of innovation, with brand extensions appearing in many guises to gain extra shelf space and tease more sales away from competitive products. Remember Kit-Kat? The consumer could only choose between either a four-finger or a two-finger size. Now, in addition to the two different sizes, there are mint, coffee and orange flavours, not to mention Senses, Chunky and ’Peanuts’. Adding malt in one of its forms to one of your standard products and the label creates this simple brand extension and allows premium pricing, boosting profitability plus the consumer benefits from the flavour and texture of malt in the product.Reducing costsMalt is made from barley or wheat, sprouted and kilned, then either ground into flour, flaked or mashed and extracted into malt extract. It is naturally sweet and has that well known “malty” aroma and flavour. What is less well-known is that when added in small amounts (under 5%) to sauces, gravies, biscuits and ice creams, for example, it acts as a flavour enhancer, bringing out the flavours naturally present, which in turn means that fewer spices, flavours and other expensive ingredients are needed, thus reducing cost. For example, when 5% malt extract was added to cheese crackers, it was found that the relatively expensive powdered/dried cheese content could be reduced by at least 10% without any noticeable effect on the final taste. The same effect was noticed in pie fillings, in the sauce or gravy, where the addition of malt extract enhanced the flavour intensity, permitting reductions in other costly ingredients. The sauces also picked up a healthy shine, improving their visual appearance. In both cases, the low percentage of malt inclusion meant there was no addition of malt flavour.In both these examples and in many other instances, the addition of a small amount of malt not only lowers the overall cost of manufacture, but also brings about subtle product enhancements.*Independent market research undertaken by Cogent Research, April 2009last_img read more

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Cold and snowy weather is here to stay this week

first_img Google+ Previous articleKeeping dogs safe in extreme cold weatherNext articleTroopers arrest South Bend man on federal warrant, additional drug charges Jon ZimneyJon Zimney is the News and Programming Director for News/Talk 95.3 Michiana’s News Channel and host of the Fries With That podcast. Follow him on Twitter @jzimney. Facebook Facebook (Photo supplied/ABC 57) (Emily Kennedy/ABC 57 Meteorologist) It is a cold morning as we wake up to single digits with wind chill values below zero. Temperatures only top out in the mid-teens today. Light snow showers pick up after midday, becoming widespread overnight. The system moves out early Tuesday morning, leaving us with a fresh coating of 1-2″ of snow. A couple of flurries are possible during the day but no additional snowfall totals. Another quick round of light snow is possible on Wednesday but past that, the rest of the workweek is quiet with daytime highs hovering near 20 degrees. Another cold front moves through Saturday, bringing a round of snow showers. This will drop our daytime highs into the single digits! Overnight lows may even drop below zero (and that’s without the wind chill). Temperatures bounce back into the low 20s by Tuesday next week. Your ABC 57 First Warning Neighborhood Weather Center Forecast:Monday: Cloudy and cold. PM snow. High 18.Monday Night: Scattered light snow. Low 12.Tuesday: Mostly cloudy, flurries. High 22.Wednesday: Light snow possible. High 20. WhatsApp Pinterest By Jon Zimney – February 8, 2021 0 185 Twitter IndianaLocalMichiganNewsWeather Pinterest Google+ Twitter WhatsApp Cold and snowy weather is here to stay this weeklast_img read more

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Mixed reaction as the Queen confirms Groceries Code Adjudicator

first_imgThe Queen’s speech in the House of Lords confirming the Groceries Code Adjudicator (GCA) has been met with mixed reactions by members of the food industry.Her Majesty’s speech, delivered today (9 May) at the State Opening of Parliament, outlined the government’s plans to establish the UK-wide Bill and the implementation of a supermarket watchdog. It will oversee the 2012 Groceries Supply Chain Code of Practice (GSCOP) to ensure the fair treatment of supermarket suppliers.The Bill aims to tackle the larger UK grocery retailers with a turnover of more than £1bn from varying supply agreements to ensure supermarket businesses pay suppliers within a reasonable timeframe. Terry Jones, director of communications at the Food and Drink Federation (FDF), has welcomed the move in a statement, which said: “We are pleased that the legislation to enable the appointment of a GCA will go forward in this session of Parliament to enforce the already established Groceries Supply Code of Practice. Together these measures will address the abuses of market power identified by the Competition Commission, giving businesses – especially small and medium-sized manufacturers – the confidence to innovate and invest, which in turn secures choice and availability for the consumer.“As the Bill proceeds through both Houses, FDF will work to establish trade associations as providers of confidential information on behalf of their members. Small suppliers need to be assured that they will not face retaliation from retailers for using the Code or speaking out about unfair practices.” However, Andrew Opie, food director at the British Retail Consortium, said the watchdog is “in danger of adding to the cost and bureaucracy of running a grocery business without adding to the strong protection which already exists for suppliers”. He added: “The government’s initial estimate put running costs at just £1m a year, a figure the BIS Select Committee said was unrealistic. The truth is no-one knows what the cost might be. Retailers are being asked to write a blank cheque.”Parliamentary copyright images are reproduced with the permission of Parliament. Image: Parliamentary Recording Unitlast_img read more

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Greggs to launch barista training academy

first_imgGreggs is to open a national barista trading academy in the Midlands for its Moment coffee shop format, it has been revealed.M&C Report, a sister title to British Baker claims the company plans to open the centre alongside its next Moment site in the Mell Square Shopping Centre in Solihull later this summer.Last month, Greggs said it planned to open a further three Moment coffee shops across the Midlands and then review the concept to decide on its “roll-out potential”.The company last year appointed Tony Rowson, the former regional operations director at Costa Coffee, as its new head of coffee.Launched in Newcastle in 2011, Greggs has since opened Moment sites in Staines, Stevenage, Middlesbrough and a further unit in Newcastle at the MetroCentre.last_img

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Joe & The Juice expands

first_imgJoe & The Juice, the expanding Swedish coffee and juice shop, has opened a new site in Manchester’s Trafford Centre and is set to open in Newcastle soon.Owner Kaspar Basse told M&C Report, a sister-title of British Baker, that the new launches are part of plans to open 10 to 15 outlets this year.It said that it will further develop its retail partnership with John Lewis and Debenhams in cities around the country. It recently opened its first site outside of London in a John Lewis in Solihull.The company is backed by Swedish equity firm Valedo.last_img

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LCD Soundsystem Just Announced Two Shows At An Intimate NYC Venue This Weekend

first_imgWhen LCD Soundsystem said their ‘Long Goodbye’ in 2011, the band filled Madison Square Garden for the emotional performance. Now, almost five years to the day, LCD will return to New York once more. Already announced to headline Panorama Festival in July, the band will hit Webster Hall for two nights of musical mayhem, this Sunday March 27th and Monday March 28th.These mark the band’s first shows in five years, though the group is slated to perform at a number of summer festivals, including Coachella and Bonnaroo. While MSG holds roughly 18,000 people, Webster Hall’s main stage has a capacity of 1,500 – and you can bet that it will be a packed house.To gain entry to the shows, dubbed “Back From The Dead,” fans can enter a lottery for tickets. Best of luck to everyone who enters!last_img read more

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Lifetime achievement award presented to Spengler and Buckley

first_imgThe New England Office of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has awarded the Harvard Extension School’s John Spengler and George Buckley an Environmental Merit Lifetime Achievement Award in recognition of their exceptional work and commitment to the environment. The award recognizes the two as outstanding environmental advocates who have dedicated their lives toward preserving and protecting the New England region’s natural resources.Spengler is director of the Sustainability and Environmental Management Program at Harvard Extension School and Akira Yamaguchi Professor of Environmental Health and Human Habitation at the Harvard School of Public Health. Buckley is assistant director of the Sustainability and Environmental Management Program. They received their awards at a special ceremony in Boston on April 22, the 40th anniversary of Earth Day.“This is well-deserved recognition for Jack Spengler and George Buckley,” said Michael Shinagel, Harvard dean of Continuing Education and University Extension. “Their commitment to the environment transcends the classroom and provides an inspiring model for our graduate sustainability and environmental management students to follow.”last_img read more

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Record 42,742 apply to College Class of ’22

first_imgA record 42,742 students applied for admission to Harvard College’s Class of 2022, an increase of 8.2 percent from the 39,506 applicants for the Class of 2021.“Harvard’s revolutionary financial aid initiative (HFAI), begun 15 years ago and enhanced since then, led the way again this year in attracting students of excellence from throughout the nation and around the world,” said William R. Fitzsimmons, dean of admissions and financial aid. “Applications have doubled since the inception of the program — and each year more and more students are excited to learn that Harvard is open to outstanding students from all economic backgrounds.”“Originally aimed at low-income students, HFAI was expanded to include middle-income students in 2007,” said Sarah C. Donahue, Griffin Director of Financial Aid. “Recently a ‘startup’ grant of $2,000 was added for the one in five students whose family incomes are less than $65,000 per year, helping them with moving expenses and other costs incurred in the transition to college.”Since launching HFAI, Harvard has awarded nearly $1.8 billion in grant aid to undergraduates. The undergraduate financial aid award budget has increased more than 131 percent, from $80 million in 2005 to more than $185 million last year. Further, Harvard’s net-price calculator makes it easy for families to get a sense of the College’s affordability.Harvard costs the same or less than most public universities for 90 percent of American families. More than half of Harvard students receive need-based financial aid, and the average grant is $53,000. No loans are required. Families with incomes up to $150,000 and typical assets pay 10 percent or less of their annual incomes. Families with higher incomes receive need-based aid depending on individual circumstances. This year, preliminary measures of economic diversity among applicants rose, with 75.5 percent applying for aid and 25.9 percent requesting an application fee waiver.There are slightly more women (50.3 percent) than men in the applicant pool this year. All geographic areas had increases in applications, especially the central and mountain states and the South, while interest from abroad remained strong.There were increases across the board in academic interests, topped by a 19.7 percent increase in prospective computer scientists. Minority applications also increased, with an 18.7 percent rise in applications from African-Americans, and a 14.9 percent increase on the part of Asian-Americans.Applicants will be notified of the admissions committee’s decisions on March 28. Admitted students will be invited to Cambridge to attend Visitas, a special program designed to familiarize them with the opportunities at Harvard. This year Visitas will be held from April 21‒23, and students will have until the national reply date of May 1 to make their final college choices.last_img read more

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Safer shellfish

first_imgResearching parasites in foodAt UGA, Ortega’s research focuses on detecting parasites in food products and environmental samples that cause diseases in humans and animals. As part of these efforts, she is working to develop new detection methods.”I’m also studying the risk factors associated with parasitic foodborne transmission,” she said. “Our Center’s goal is to help the industry develop safer produce and food products and provide the industry with testing, development and evaluation methods to inactivate parasites on our food.”In 1993, Ortega was part of a team of scientists that first identified Cyclospora, a parasite linked to outbreaks in raspberries, basil and lettuce.The parasite was falsely linked to strawberries in a 1995 Texas outbreak. “The strawberries were blamed,” Ortega said, “and strawberry growers lost $20 million in one week. $500,000 USDA grantOrtega has been awarded a $500,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture. She will conduct the three-year project along with UGA food scientist Yao-Wen Huang and researchers from the USDA and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.”First we will go to the areas where shellfish are normally harvested,” she said, “along the Georgia coast, the Gulf of Mexico and the East Coast. Then we will examine the specimens for the presence of parasites. We will also be evaluating methods to inactivate parasites in shellfish.”Foodborne illnesses linked to parasites can take up to a week to strike, Ortega said. Illnesses caused by foodborne pathogens result in symptoms much sooner. By Sharon OmahenUniversity of GeorgiaUniversity of Georgia parasitologist Ynes Ortega will lead a research team looking into whether parasites that are filtered from the water into oysters and other shellfish are infectious to humans.”This is an unknown area, and that’s why this research is so crucial,” said Ortega, a scientist with the UGA Center for Food Safety in Griffin, Ga. “We need to know if this is an area of concern for the public’s health.”last_img read more