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Students broadcast campus radio shows

first_img“Sound of Notre Dame” (WSND) and “Voice of the Fighting Irish” (WVFI) broadcast an range of student radio shows that cover music, sports, politics and more. WSND airs on FM station 88.9 to serve both Notre Dame and the surrounding area, and WVFI streams online for students at nd.edu/~wvfi Senior station manager Patrick Brown said WSND is a classical radio station during the day and a college rock station at night. “We pride ourselves in offering a very wide variety of music,” Brown said. “You won’t just hear the ‘1812 Overture’ 24/7.” Both Notre Dame students and South Bend residents work at WSND, and Brown said the station unites these two groups. “We [are] a meeting place for both Notre Dame and the South Bend community,” Brown said. Brown said WSND garners 8,000 to 10,000 listeners at a time because it spans a wide audience. WSND broadcasts from the clock tower of O’Shaughnessy Hall, and according to Brown, this vantage point is an asset for those who work at the station. “Not that many people know we’re up there but … we have this great view of South Quad,” Brown said. “Every time the sun sets, we watch that over campus, and we’re really lucky to have that view. It’s definitely a benefit of working at WSND.” Sophomore Kate Johnson hosted a classical request program Sunday afternoons and a specialty “Taffelmusic” show Friday afternoons on WSND last semester. Johnson, a music major, wanted to exercise her appreciation for classical music through her shows. “It’s expanded my knowledge of music a hundred times more than I would get in the classroom,” Johnson said. The WVFI office in LaFortune Student Center offers diverse student-run programming that included 70 different shows this semester. Senior station manager Nicolle Walkling said she joined WVFI her freshman year because she wanted to share her love of music with students. “[WVFI] seemed like the perfect outlet for me to share my music with others and discover new kinds of music,” Walkling said. “I hoped to find a community that loved music as much as me and an activity that I felt was worthwhile.” Unlike WSND, WVFI is completely student-run. Walkling said the station garners only 550 listeners per week because it only appeals to Notre Dame students. WVFI broadcasts a range of niche shows hosted by different students. This semester’s lineup included a dating advice program hosted by a graduate student under the alias “Emma Woodhouse,” a college rock show called “Werewolf Bar Mitzvah” hosted by senior Brooke Healy and “Hungover,” a music show with weekly themes hosted by seniors Colin Rich and Kennedy Collins. Collins said his show’s title was inspired by his former Sunday morning timeslot at 10 a.m. The show now streams online at 11 a.m. Friday mornings, but Collins said “Hungover” is still an applicable title for the program. “We cover elaborate themes that we usually come up with at trivia night at Legends the night before,” Collins said.last_img read more

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Festival marks Indian holiday

first_imgThe Indian Association of Notre Dame (IAND) delivered a sense of traditional Indian culture to the ballroom in the LaFortune Student Center with a Diwali Celebration on Sunday night. The Diwali celebration, known as “The Festival of Lights,” included a prayer service, a dinner of Indian cuisine and a dance celebration featuring Indian music. The Diwali celebration holds great importance to people all across India from a variety of faiths, including Hinduism, Jainism and Sikhism. “Diwali is one of the most important festivals in India, marking the end of the Indian calendar,” Indian Association faculty advisor Jindal Shah said. Five organizations came together to sponsor the Diwali event: the Graduate Student Union, International Student Service and Activities, Campus Ministry and the Indian Association of Notre Dame. The Student Activities Organization (SAO) helped provide the venue for the evening in the LaFortune Ballroom, and Campus Ministry sponsored the Diwali celebration as part of the Prayer from Around the World Series. Prof. Shah began the event with an explanation of the origins of Diwali. He said the story of Diwali spans back into Indian lore and the tale of King Dashratha, whose eldest son Rama was betrothed to the beautiful Sita and was set to inherit the kingdom. However, Rama was exiled by his jealous stepmother for 14 years. Meanwhile, the demon king Ravana kidnapped Sita, leading to a fierce battle between Rama and Ravana that ended in Rama’s victory and the return of his bride Sita. “The people lit candles to mark the return of Rama and Sita, creating the festival of lights that announces the triumph of good over evil,” Shah said. “In the story, Ravana embodies all that is evil, and Rama embodies all that is good.” Graduate student Gaurav Nigam, co-president of IAND, said the Diwali festival required about a month of planning and sought to fulfill several goals. “We wanted to make everyone aware of the Indian festivals and make the Indian students feel at home because we don’t get to celebrate Indian festivals in America very often,” Nigam said. Nigam said the Indian Association typically hosts two major festivals each year. Suresh Vishwanath, a chemical engineering graduate student and co-president of IAND, said those who celebrate Diwali pray for well-being and blessing on this occasion. Attendees of the Diwali celebration at Notre Dame came from many faiths and regions. “Some people here today faced two to three hour drives to help set up and be with us today,” Vishwanath said.   Contact Charley Ducey at [email protected]last_img read more

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Notre Dame seniors react to change in commencement speaker

first_imgIn a change that pleased many Notre Dame seniors, Rev. Ray Hammond will deliver the 169th Commencement address instead of Lord Christopher Patten, the chancellor of the University of Oxford and chair of the BBC Trust, the University announced in a press release May 1. Hammond, a Philadelphia native, founded Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Boston. He entered Harvard College at age 15, graduated with a bachelor’s degree at 19 and earned his medical degree at 23, according to the press release.Senior Lucy Smith said she thought Hammond would be a better speaker than Patten would have been.“Originally the speaker, Christopher Patten, sounded cool but entirely not relatable to a good portion of our student body,” Smith said. “He was a wealthy, Catholic, British man who had a sparkly resume of success and power, but was also very old and past his prime. “When the news came out, no one really cared. However, when they announced the new speaker, Ray Hammond, there was a shift in campus-wide support.”Smith said Hammond’s experience using his “brilliance” to graduate at a young age from Harvard and serving his community through hands-on work would allow him to speak about issues relevant and significant to the graduating class.“He has done work with the people of Boston to end gang violence,” she said. “That’s pretty darn cool, and applicable to many people in our class. “While Lord Patten is accomplished, Reverend Hammond is doing the work of God in the streets. He actively goes into the streets and tries to help people in need, people who are avoided by most. “He recognizes the importance of the dignity of each human person, and I think our class could use and would love to hear and be inspired by that sort of spirit before we go out into the real world. While he might not be the premier Catholic man in England, Rev. Hammond is spreading the love of God through action to those who need it. That is the sort of message I want to hear.”Senior Ben Finan said Patten spoke two years ago in Geddes Hall about Oxford and his time as the last British governor of Hong Kong. Finan said he regretted Patten could not attend but looked forward to hearing Hammond speak.“Although I am sad to see Lord Patten fall ill and become unable to make it after I heard him speak two years ago, Ray Hammond seems to be a fantastic replacement,” Finan said. “As an incredibly accomplished man—both a medical doctor and a preacher, he is an inspiration to our rising generation. “I hope that Rev. Dr. Hammond will discuss what drove him to such revolutionary ideals, as well as offering some level of advice on what remains to be accomplished.”Senior Antoinette Pusateri, a biology and theology double major, said Hammond’s experience between medicine and faith-based ministry particularly interested her.“As a doctor-to-be myself, I am excited to hear Dr. Hammond speak of how his medical career, but moreover, his Christian faith, informs the way he lives his life,” she said. “But surely his advice will transcend all majors, and remind us of our mission as Notre Dame alumni to heal, unify, and enlighten the world around us according to our abilities.”The University announced in March that Hammond will receive an honorary degree in humane letters at this year’s Commencement ceremony. Patten canceled his speech at Notre Dame, as well as several other engagements, for health reasons, vice president for public affairs and communications Paul Browne told The Observer. “We are disappointed that Lord Patten will be unable to join us and will keep him in our prayers,” University President Fr. John Jenkins said in the press release. “At the same time, we are delighted and grateful that Rev. Ray Hammond has accepted our invitation to address the class of 2014.“His life’s story and work are an inspiration, and I know he will provide our graduates with a powerful address.”Browne said Jenkins’ personal interactions with Hammond played a role in the decision.“Fr. John had met [Hammond] personally and was impressed with his spiritual demeanor as well as his life’s accomplishments and thought he would deliver a powerful message to the students,” Browne said.Hammond worked as a doctor before turning to ministry in 1976 and earned a Master of Arts degree in the Study of Religion (Christian and Medical Ethics) at Harvard Graduate School of Arts and Sciences in 1982, the release said.Hammond served as the former chair of the Boston Foundation and founder and chairman of the Ten Point Coalition, which the release described as “an ecumenical group of Christian clergy and lay leaders behind Boston’s successful efforts to quell gang violence in the 1990s.”He also has served as executive director of Bethel’s Generation Excel program, executive committee member of the Black Ministerial Alliance, chair of the Boston Opportunity Agenda and a member of the Strategy Team for the Greater Boston Interfaith Organization, the release said. Beyond that, he is a trustee of the Yawkey Foundation, the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, the John F. Kennedy Library Foundation and the Math and Technology Charter High School.Tags: 2014 Commencement, Christopher Patten, Commencement Speaker, Ray Hammond, speakerlast_img read more

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House Bill 1022 moves forward

first_imgA bill to change state law surrounding the extent to which private university police departments are required to make their records available to the public is headed to the governor’s office, according to the Indiana General Assembly’s website.House Bill 1022, sponsored by State Rep. Patrick Bauer (D-South Bend), would require private colleges and universities to release information about incidents that result in arrests or incarcerations to the public.The House first approved the bill by a unanimous vote in January. After an amendment was added, the bill passed in Senate by a 49-to-1 vote on March 1. Two days later, the House voted 93-0 to affirm the bill.The bill will now go to the desk of Indiana Gov. Mike Pence. If he signs the bill, it will become a law.The amendment changed the bill to give individuals employed by educational institutions as police officers the same statutory immunities granted to a state police officer. It also gives private educational institutions the same statutory immunity granted to the state.Bauer said in a previous interview with The Observer the purpose of the bill is to require university police departments to be more transparent with their public records.Critics of the bill say it does not require enough transparency from private universities because only a small portion of campus incidents result in arrests.If passed, the bill would apply to Notre Dame Security Police (NDSP), the University’s private police force.In January 2015, ESPN filed a lawsuit against the University after NDSP refused to grant an ESPN reporter access to campus police records related to student-athletes. The case, ruled in Notre Dame’s favor by the St. Joseph Superior Court, was appealed by ESPN. Attorneys from both parties presented their oral arguments in the Indiana Court of Appeals and expect a ruling to be issued soon.Bauer, a Notre Dame alumnus, said the bill is not a direct result of the ESPN lawsuit. Rather, he said the bill stems from concerns raised by Indiana citizens, including many Notre Dame graduates.Tags: ESPN lawsuit, HB 1022, Patrick Bauerlast_img read more

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Students enjoy versatility of new Library Lawn

first_imgLibrary Lawn is the newest renovation to Notre Dame’s campus, as the grassy area between Hesburgh Library and Notre Dame Stadium— also known as Library Quad — has been transformed into a hangout space for all students to enjoy.The quad is dotted with Adirondack chairs, fire pits and umbrellas, allowing students to utilize the lawn, no matter the weather.“I love the vibe here,” senior Alessandro Preda said about the lawn. “It’s very relaxing and mellow which makes it a great place to hang out,” John Salem | The Observer Located between Notre Dame Stadium and Hesburgh Library sits the new Library Lawn. The area includes chairs, umbrellas and a performance stage for students to use.Another highlight of the setup is the large black stage, which serves a number of purposes from concerts to live contests. The final section of Library Lawn — the area between the stage and the hangout area — is called ‘The Green’ and is meant to be a place for students to play recreational games such as cornhole and spikeball.The Library Lawn made its debut last weekend and the Student Activities Office (SAO) put together a number of events to draw in students to the renovated quad. These events ranged from sunset yoga to free frozen yogurt and culminated in a fireworks display Saturday night.The motivation behind the creation of the lawn are rather simple.“Everyone at the University was interested in the students having more opportunities for safe, outdoor fun on campus,” Nick Johnson, executive director of ND Innovates, said.Johnson also said the lawn was a collaborative effort between SAO and University Enterprises and Events, a division of the Office of the Executive Vice president, which is in charge of organizing and executing events on campus year-round. The two groups were inspired by similar renovations done in major metropolitan areas around the country in order to draw more people downtown.“The Library Lawn project not only makes better use of a beautiful green space framed by iconic buildings, but it’s a perfect location for students to relax,” Jennifer McGuire, athletic director at the University Enterprises and Events division, said.McGuire said student feedback has been “overwhelmingly positive” as the Notre Dame residents seem to enjoy the new hangout area quite a bit.“My favorite part of the lawn has gotta be the fire pits, because s’mores!” sophomore Karina Duffy said.Perhaps the most widely appreciated aspect of the Library Lawn is how many different purposes it serves.“I really enjoy the fact that, with the comfortable chairs and open spaces, the lawn is a great place to relax with friends and get some work done,” sophomore Hannah Wahle said.In addition, students enjoy having the room to spread out and enjoy the nice weather.“I love the lawn,” sophomore Katie Nolan said. “I live in Flaherty and don’t really have access to many open spaces like this.”Library Lawn isn’t the only renovation that SAO and University Enterprises and Events have planned.“Plans are afoot to similarly outfit additional space adjacent to the Hesburgh Library,” McGuire said.The aforementioned space will serve a similar purpose as the current lawn ,but more so will be a quiet area geared towards studying and work space. Both this new space and the current lawn are expected to stay open until the end of October, depending on the weather.Although Library Lawn has been met with much praise, it seems like there are still some aspects to be worked out down the line.“I wish the Wi-Fi was better out here,” Preda said.The lawn is currently open until midnight Sunday through Thursday and until 2 a.m on Fridays and Saturdays.Tags: cornhole, Hesburgh Library, Library Lawn, SAO, spikeballlast_img read more

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Lysol Maker: Don’t Drink Our Cleaning Products

first_imgVia rb.comNEW YORK – The company that makes Lysol has an urgent message to its customers: do not to consume our cleaning products.It comes after President Trump suggested the possibility of injecting disinfectants to protect people from Coronavirus.The suggestion came Thursday during the White House Coronavirus Task Force news briefing.Reckitt Benckiser, a British company, warned Friday human consumption of disinfectant products is dangerous. “Under no circumstance should our disinfectant products be administered into the human body through injection, ingestion or any other route,” the company said in a statement.They issued the statement after, “recent speculation and social media activity.” Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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SUNY Fredonia Students Suspended For Allegedly Violating COVID-19 Regulations

first_imgWNY News Now Stock Image.FREDONIA – More than a dozen students at SUNY Fredonia were suspended Tuesday for allegedly violating the school’s COVID-19 regulations.In a letter to students, University President Stephen Kolison, Jr. said 13 students violated the Student Code of Conduct by attending a off-campus gathering.“Any Fredonia student who endangers others by disregarding public health precautions will face serious penalties,” wrote Kolison. “We also talked honestly about repercussions for not following the rules.”School officials say the suspensions were issued after reviewing the new policy. Educators are asking others at the college to remind their peers to follow guidelines to help stop the spread of COVID-19 and ultimately keep the community safe. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Small Pharmacies Crippled By State Switching Services To Ohio Company

first_imgU.S. Air Force Image ALBANY — A decision by the New York State Office For People With Developmental Disabilities to transfer institutional pharmacy services to an Ohio-based company will cripple small, local pharmacies, according to State Sen. George Borrello and Assemblyman Andrew Goodell.Borrello and Goodell are calling on the state and the agency to reconsider a decision to transfer services out of state.The decision will mean the loss of $30 to $40 million annually in revenues for independent pharmacies in the state, potentially causing the closure of many and shifting those taxpayer dollars out of New York State and into Ohio, the two lawmakers said.“Now, more than ever, the state should make it a priority to utilize New York State-based companies and small businesses to deliver critical services. Yet, this decision will achieve the opposite; it will actually take away business and revenue from independent pharmacies who have been providing vitally needed services to facilities in their areas for years. For many, it will result in the closure of their pharmacies and job losses, which will have a ripple effect in their communities,” Borrello said. In a letter to Governor Andrew Cuomo, Borrello pointed to an example of the devastating consequences of the decision. An independent, MWBE-owned pharmacy in his district has been providing subcontracted institutional pharmacy services to DDSO (Developmental Disability Service Office) facilities and patients for several years. The changeover means a dramatic loss of the pharmacy’s revenue and will lead to layoffs.Borrello and Goodell also underscored that the change will mean a diminished level of service for DDSO clients. The new pharmacy main point of service is more than two hours away from the communities to be served in Chautauqua and Cattaraugus counties, which will mean longer wait times (and likely, higher costs) for emergency medication deliveries. Specialized medical items, such as feeding devices and formulas, will also no longer be easily available, as the out-of-state provider does not supply these items.“This decision is a bad one for the often medically fragile DDSO clients who rely on the personalized and immediate service these independent pharmacies have provided. Now, they will be at the mercy of an out-of-state provider whose business model and service locations are ill-suited to their needs,” he added.“The state has an unfortunate track record of trying to cut costs through methods that ultimately prove to be more costly, such as its ill-conceived effort to centralize non-emergency medical transportation (NEMT), which was supposed to save the state money. Instead, transportation brokers ended up substituting public transit for single rider taxi services and costs skyrocketed by more than 1000 percent in some regions. By all accounts, this provider change is going down that same path,” said Senator Borrello.Goodell also noted that the Ohio company has been the subject of several lawsuits, including a recent one initiated by the U.S. Department of Justice. The DOJ has accused the pharmacy of putting the safety of patients at risk by filling prescriptions that had long expired or run out of refills. The allegation is the latest in a string of legal problems for the company. It settled federal lawsuits in 2016 and 2018 to resolve allegations of kickbacks.“The commitment of state funds to a corporation with ethical failings is an abdication of the state’s fiduciary duty to taxpayers. For these reasons and others, we are urging the state and OPWDD to reexamine and reverse this short-sighted decision,” said Goodell.Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Watch Inishmaan’s Daniel Radcliffe on Broadway Love & Tony Snubs

first_imgThe Cripple of Inishmaan headliner Daniel Radcliffe stopped by CBS This Morning to discuss everything from Gary Oldman’s nudity advice to his adoration for Broadway. “You guys have the most bustling, exciting, theater district in the world,” Radcliffe says. While the Tony nominating committee may not have recognized his acclaimed performance for a third time this season, Radcliffe keeps his head up, assuring us, “it’s not going to stop me from coming back.” And while he may be known for playing a certain boy wizard, the Broadway.com Audience Choice Award winner seems to be keeping his eye on the stage: “As much as Potter was responsible for the first part of my career, I do think Broadway can take a lot of credit for the next.” Take a look at his interview below! Star Files View Comments Show Closed This production ended its run on July 20, 2014 Related Shows The Cripple of Inishmaan Daniel Radcliffelast_img read more

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Exclusive! First Look at The Last Ship, Soon Sailing to Broadway

first_img Related Shows The Last Ship What have you got? A new musical by a Grammy-winning rock star. The Last Ship, penned by Sting, will bring a lively English shipyard to the Great White Way this fall. Featuring a book by John Logan and Brian Yorkey and directed by Joe Mantello, the musical played a pre-Broadway engagement in Chicago earlier this summer. Broadway.com has an exclusive first look at the tuner’s stunning TV spot, where you can spot stars Jimmy Nail, Michael Esper, Rachel Tucker and more. Check it out below, then catch The Last Ship at the Neil Simon Theatre beginning September 29. View Comments Show Closed This production ended its run on Jan. 24, 2015last_img