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Da Vinci’s Treasure™ by Pragmatic Play

first_img John Hunter is on a mission to find The Secrets of Da Vinci’s Treasure™ in the 3×5, 25 lines videoslot. Follow the map and go on quest where you can win up to 100x bet. Discover clues in Da Vinci’s art for instant wins. In the free spins round, multipliers pile up, increasing by 1x at every free spin, up to 60x.Play the demo version here. Casino & games Da Vinci’s Treasure™ by Pragmatic Play John Hunter is on a mission to find The Secrets of Da Vinci’s Treasure™ in the 3×5, 25 lines videoslot. 28th September 2018 | By Louella Hughes AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Topics: Casino & games Slots Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Email Addresslast_img

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New York regulator to begin sports betting talks

first_img The New York State Gaming Commission will meet to discuss sports betting regulations for the state’s land-based casinos early next week. 25th January 2019 | By contenteditor Legal & compliance The New York State Gaming Commission will meet to discuss sports betting regulations for the state’s land-based casinos on Monday (January 28).An agenda published ahead of the meeting states that the Commission will look at proposed rules for sports betting.The Commission did not go into detail as to what it will specifically focus on at the meeting, but it will be the first time that the regulatory body will officially discuss potential rules and regulations for the vertical.A 2013 constitutional amendment gave the state’s casinos the right to launch sports betting should the Professional and Amateur Sports Act (PASPA) be repealed. After the law was struck down by the Supreme Court in May last year, the only hurdle to lauching legal betting has been the need for the Commission to devise a regulatory framework for the vertical. This amendment was approved by voters in November 2013, as part of a broader gambling expansion bill that paves the way for up to seven additional casinos to be constructed in the state, in a bid to bring jobs to upstate regions. However the legislation only allows in-person wagering, with no provision for any form of sports betting outside casino walls, prompting lawmakers to push for a wider roll-out. Last month, Senator Joseph Addabbo pre-filed a bill setting out a regulatory framework for land-based, online and mobile sports betting across the state.  S00017 proposes a tax of 8.5% of sports betting gross revenue, as well as a royalty fee of 0.2% of each operator’s sports betting handle, to be paid to the Commission each quarter.The state’s casinos, which would be the only entities eligible for sports betting licences under Addabbo’s bill, would also be restricted to using official league data for wagering.The bill, along with a separate bill from Addabbo to legalise online poker, have been allocated to the Racing, Gaming and Wagering Committee for debate in the 2019 legislative session, which began on January 9.Assemblymember Gary Pretlow, who submitted the sports betting amendment to the 2013 bill, has also said he will introduce a proposal.This month, it was also revealed that the iconic Madison Square Garden (MSG) in New York could be one of the first venues to take advantage of legalised sports betting in the state after its parent company applied to trademark its MSG brand for use in sports wagering.Madison Square Garden Company has filed an application with the United States Patent and Trademark Office referencing the use of the MSG brand across online, mobile and social media.Image: Sam valadi Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwittercenter_img Regions: US New York Topics: Legal & compliance Sports betting New York regulator to begin sports betting talks Email Addresslast_img read more

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NJ targets harsh penalties for prohibited sports bets

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter A bill from New Jersey Assemblymember Ralph Caputo would formalise the penalties imposed on licensees that offer odds on sporting events for which betting is prohibited, with the guilty parties facing fines and automatic licence suspensions. Casino & games Tags: Online Gambling OTB and Betting Shops Race Track and Racino Video Gaming Regions: US New Jersey NJ targets harsh penalties for prohibited sports bets 8th March 2019 | By contenteditor Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Topics: Casino & games Esports Legal & compliance Sports betting Video gaming Horse racing A bill from New Jersey Assemblymember Ralph Caputo would formalise the penalties imposed on licensees that offer odds on sporting events for which betting is prohibited, with the guilty parties facing fines and automatic licence suspensions.Having been introduced at the end of February and assigned to the Assembly Tourism, Gaming and the Arts Committee, it now progresses to a second reading in the chamber. The bill was approved by the committee, with six members voting in favour, one abstaining and no votes against.The bill aims to have licensed operators found to have taken bets on prohibited events refund all amounts wagered, as well as paying a fine of between $20,000 (£15,300/€17,800) and $10,000. They will also have their sports betting licence suspended for a period of up to 10 days.New Jersey’s sports betting regulations currently define a “prohibited sports event” as any collegiate sport or athletic contest taking place within the state, or any involving a New Jersey college team, regardless of where it takes place. However, offering markets on tournaments or leagues in which a New Jersey college team permits is not banned, nor is betting on collegiate sports taking place outside state borders banned.Betting on all high school sports events, electronic sports and competitive video gaming (esports) is also banned under current state law.This penalty framework would be brought into force for both the Division of Gaming Enforcement and New Jersey Racing Commission. Fines imposed by the DGE would be paid into the state Casino Control Fund, while those levied by the Racing Commission will go to the New Jersey General Fund. Email Addresslast_img read more

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Hades: River of Souls by Fantasma Games

first_img Email Address AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Let your players enjoy an exciting high volatility slot, set deep under the dark earth where the fires burns and lost souls roams! In this 3-row, 5-reel slot players can win both ways. Features include multipliers, wilds, and free spins! Max win 5 058x bet! Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Let your players enjoy an exciting high volatility slot, set deep under the dark earth where the fires burns and lost souls roams! In this 3-row, 5-reel slot players can win both ways. Features include multipliers, wilds, and free spins! Max win 5 058x bet! Casino & games Topics: Casino & games Slots 22nd June 2020 | By Aaron Noy Hades: River of Souls by Fantasma Gameslast_img read more

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The Gambling Review Podcast: Episode 1

The Gambling Review Podcast: Episode 1 Topics: Legal & compliance Regulation 26th October 2020 | By Aaron Noy In the first episode of The Gambling Review Podcast, Betting and Gaming Council chief executive Michael Dugher sets out why the industry won’t wait for lawmakers to act before implementing positive changes across the sector. Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Podcast: Play in new window | Download center_img Legal & compliance Listen online here! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Email Address

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Action 24/7 appeals Tennessee licence suspension with lawsuit

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Read the full story on iGB North America Tags: Tennessee Education Lottery Action 24/7 24th March 2021 | By Daniel O’Boyle However, Action 24/7 contests that its operations were initially suspended by Susan Lanigan, chair of the Lottery’s board, before the board met as a whole to vote on the motion. This, it said, was not within Lanigan’s authority. The operator’s license was suspended last week after it reported cases of credit and debit card fraud and proxy betting from player accounts. It became the first online sportsbook operator to have its licence suspended in the US. Regions: US Tennessee Subscribe to the iGaming newslettercenter_img Topics: Legal & compliance Sports betting Legal Licensing Online sports betting Sports betting regulation Email Address Legal Action 24/7 appeals Tennessee licence suspension with lawsuit Tennessee-based operator Action 24/7 has filed a lawsuit appealing the license suspension handed down by the Tennessee Education Lottery in Davidson County Chancery Court, arguing the suspension was “erroneous and arbitrary”, and that its timing caused “irreparable harm”. “Despite the fact that there was no ongoing internal control failure at the time of the suspension, the license was suspended due to supposed ‘exigent circumstances’ which, to date, TEL cannot articulate,” Action 24/7 said.last_img read more

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GC highlights illegal gambling and vulnerable people in 2021-24 strategy

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter The Commission’s three-year strategy shows similarities to the last one published, for 2018-21, whose key priorities were protecting the interests of consumers, preventing harm to the public, raising standards in the gambling market, optimising charitable returns from lotteries and improving the way the Commission regulates. An increased focus on reducing criminal activity and increasing protections for minors and vulnerable people appear to be two key differences, in addition to changes to the business plan made in response to the novel coronavirus (Covid-19) pandemic. 1st April 2021 | By Conor Mulheir According to the commission’s income forecast for the next 12 months, it expects 34% of its income to come from the betting sector, 26% from casino, 12% from software, 8% from each of machines, lotteries and arcades, and a further 4% from bingo. Referring to its response to the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic, the business plan states that instructions given to the industry including the implementation of stronger affordability checks, the banning of reverse withdrawals and restrictions on bonus offers, have been further justified by additional Covid-19 specific data it has gathered since making the requests to the industry. Regions: UK & Ireland GC highlights illegal gambling and vulnerable people in 2021-24 strategy Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter It said that delivering a high quality, effective competition for the next National Lottery licence while maintaining the current performance of the existing licence is a key focus. Topics: Legal & compliance Legal Licensing Regulation The Commission said its new strategy will be delivered through five priority areas: the protection of children and vulnerable people from gambling-related harm, a fairer market with better-informed customers, keeping crime out of gambling, optimising charitable donations from the National Lottery and improving gambling regulation. Tags: British Gambling Commission The British Gambling Commission has launched its three-year corporate strategy for 2021-24, setting out its key priorities for the next three years, alongside its 2021-22 business plan. Email Address It also said that ensuring operator compliance with enhanced player protection measures will continue to drive its work in the next 12 months, while it continues to focus on the future with the review of the Gambling Act. Staff expenditure is expected to make up 73% of the year’s costs, while other areas including IT, professional fees, office and administrative, research, recruitment and training and others make up the remainder. The regulator’s annual business plan sets out the key milestones it hopes to achieve between April 2021 and March 2022. Regulationlast_img read more

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Demystifying affordability part three: Convenience, privacy and civil liberties

first_imgRegtech It is for operators to create sustainable affordability frameworks that are able to manage this challenge but we are confident this balance can be found. For example, beBettor combines personal and open data, as well as screening against derogatory data sets, to provide operators with frictionless assessments of affordability for their customers, delivered as a discretionary income estimate. Source of Funds (SOF) & Source of Wealth (SOW) checks can require customers to provide historical financial documents (such as bank statements, payslips or P60s) which can be both intrusive on the customer’s privacy and time consuming. These assessments require no additional information from the customer, making them highly convenient and suited to early stages in the customer journey. The previous article in the ‘Demystifying Affordability’ series focused on automation and how operators can implement a layered approach when addressing affordability. It clarified the distinction between initial automated affordability assessments, consisting of non-intrusive, frictionless checks and enhanced affordability assessments that require additional, sensitive information from the customer. Focusing on the customer Affordability is a relative concept, as highlighted by the House of Lords Select Committee report on Gambling Harm, showing the importance of a tailored approach: “What can be an enormous sum and totally unaffordable for most people is, for some, small change”. Initial affordability assessments that use non-intrusive affordability checks can be conducted seamlessly in the background with no disruption to the customer. This gives operators the ability to gauge a player’s affordability, which can inform customer interactions that are tailored to the individual. The Commission has consistently spoken about promoting and protecting the customer’s interests in regulation. In recent times, operators have echoed this customer-first sentiment, focusing on improving the customer experience and embracing social responsibility through responsible gaming initiatives, to ensure long term sustainability of the industry. Under the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), all parties responsible for using personal data have to follow strict rules called data protection principles. These are to ensure information is used fairly, lawfully and transparently. On the other end of the spectrum, operators are required to deliver their service responsibly and do so by identifying those who may be vulnerable to experiencing harm and apply suitable protections at different stages in the customer journey. Over the years, operators have endeavoured to improve the customer experience in a number of different ways. While there are many instances where friction is necessary throughout the customer journey, one area operators have looked to improve is the removal of unnecessary friction that worsens the user experience. When considering how to reduce friction in affordability, it’s once again important to adopt a layered approach, as outlined in part two of the series. For customers who require additional assessment, enhanced affordability checks provide an important layer of protection, to ensure they can afford a certain level of spend. These checks are designed as a handbrake to pause the individual’s play until a time at which there is evidence, via financial documentation, that they can afford their level of gambling spend. Enhanced assessments require more intrusion on the customer’s privacy, yet are a necessary step to ensure the customer is protected. Alongside considering the convenience of the customer when addressing affordability, it’s also important to take into account their privacy, whether this be the sense of the level of intrusion being appropriate to the risk of harm, or more generally in avoiding the feeling of a “Big Brother” approach. However, some enhanced affordability assessments require additional, highly sensitive data from the customer. Open banking is an example of a tool that can assist operators with enhanced affordability assessments. It gives operators access to financial information by providing oversight of a customer’s current accounts for 90 days. Due to the sensitive nature of the financial data the operator has access to, additional and repeated customer consent is required. As such, enhanced affordability measures such as open banking are often used only when needed most. Demystifying affordability part three: Convenience, privacy and civil liberties These checks typically have relatively low opt-in rates from customers, therefore using these enhanced checks at early stages in the customer journey could be seen as too intrusive and customers may choose not to divulge sensitive financial information at this stage. The Gambling Commission endeavours to put the consumer at the heart of regulation. While affordability as a topic may require additional data and evidence to conclude that an individual can afford a certain level of spend, at times, this may infringe on an individual’s freedom to gamble at the level they desire. Initial affordability assessments that use open data can be conducted seamlessly in the background without requiring additional data or consent from the customer, beyond that which is contained in the operator’s privacy policy. If operators use a third party supplier to conduct these checks, the third party supplier is able to do so under the lawful basis of legitimate interest. This final article of the series will consider affordability from the customer’s perspective. This means balancing what would be considered to be a convenient and justified way of assessing affordability at different stages in the customer journey and what could be deemed to be overly intrusive and an infringement on civil liberties. Given modern sensitivities around data security and sharing of sensitive data, as well as the risk of improper use of such data by an industry that has historically struggled with trust, measures need to be appropriate to the risk presented and stage of the customer journey.center_img Initial affordability assessments that use non-intrusive checks based on combining personal data (which the operator already holds) and open data to screen for vulnerability are designed to be minimally intrusive and can be conducted in the background without disrupting the customer. Customer privacy Striking the right balance between applying suitable protections for customers continuously throughout the customer journey while minimising the infringement on customer privacy and civil liberties, is ultimately the challenge when addressing affordability. In this three-part series, Sonny Cott – operations manager for affordability solutions provider BeBettor – explains one of the most important topics for gambling operators in 2021: affordability. Convenience for the customer Data protection and consent AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Civil liberties of the customer Tags: Gambling Commission Affordability BeBettor However, enhanced assessments are a vital part of a layered approach to affordability and should be used when a customer’s risk increases. These enhanced assessments are more understandable from the customer’s perspective if they’re used to ascertain whether an individual can afford high levels of spend. Therefore in the context of affordability, it’s important to consider the customer’s perspective, in terms of convenience and privacy. From the customer’s point of view, what are the best methods of assessing affordability to ensure protected play that is tailored to the individual? Regions: UK & Ireland Enhanced assessments in some cases will require the customer to provide additional information that can be both highly sensitive and inconvenient to provide. As such, individuals will require limits and protections set relative to their personal circumstances, with the consequences of a universal or blanket approach to be felt in reduced civil liberty. Depending on whether an operator wants to conduct an initial or enhanced affordability assessment, and any potential marks left behind, the data and therefore required consent may change. Enhanced checks will likely require additional consent from the customer. Both the Gambling Commission and operators have placed great emphasis on the importance of putting the consumer at the heart of what they do. 29th April 2021 | By Daniel O’Boyle Topics: Social responsibility Tech & innovation Problem gambling Responsible gambling Regtech However, it does so to ensure protection of the customer from experiencing financial harm. In the context of affordability, operators are permitted to process their customer’s personal data via consent which is obtained through the operator’s terms and conditions or privacy policy. However, operators typically use a number of third-party suppliers in order to deliver their services and in many cases use suppliers to aid in assessing an individual’s affordability. Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Email Addresslast_img read more

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Trio of Belgian tennis pros suspended amid corruption investigation

first_imgThe three players are Arthur de Greef, Romain Barbosa and Alex Witmeur. Of the three, de Greef had been the most successful player, reaching a career-high ATP singles ranking of 113 and competing at the 2017 French Open. Trio of Belgian tennis pros suspended amid corruption investigation Since rebranding from its former name the Tennis Integrity Unit, the ITIA has made a number of suspensions. Most recently, Argentinian player Nicolás Arreche received a similar provisional suspension, again for an unnamed corruption offense. Earlier this month, the ITIA banned Kazakhstan’s Roman Khassanov for 10 years after he admitted to several instances of match-fixing.  Topics: Legal & compliance Social responsibility Legal Sports integrity The body did not reveal the offences being investigated, but said the provisional suspension can be handed down if players are charged with a criminal offence, or the subject of criminal proceedings, and that these charges can also be considered a “major offense” by the ITIA. 28th May 2021 | By Daniel O’Boyle Under the suspensions – handed down by administrative hearing officer professor Richard McLaren – the players may not compete in or attending any sanctioned tennis events organised by the governing bodies of the sport, such as the ATP and ITF, until it is lifted. Regions: Europe Western Europe Belgium AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Argentinian Franco Feitt, Slovakian player Barbora Palcatova and two Russian players have also received bans this year. A “major offense” is any ITIA offense that can lead to a suspension of more than six months of a fine of more than $10,000 (£7,043/€8,198). Sports integrity Tags: International Tennis Integrity Agency Three Belgian tennis players have been provisionally suspended following both an investigation from the International Tennis Integrity Agency (ITIA) and a criminal investigation. Email Addresslast_img read more

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Committee approves Ohio betting bill, launch delayed to April 2022

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Ohio’s Senate Gaming Committee has unanimously approved a bill to allow sports betting in the state, after including an omnibus amendment that would delay the market opening to 1 April but increase the number of licensees. Committee approves Ohio betting bill, launch delayed to April 2022 Sports betting regulation Regions: US Ohio Licences will then be approved from April 1, 2022. Topics: Sports betting Legal Online sports betting Retail sports betting Sports betting regulation “Everybody we’ve talked to says they want an equal start time, so applications for these licences will open up on January 1, 2022” Read the full story on iGB North America. 16th June 2021 | By Daniel O’Boyle Email Address Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter If passed, the bill – SB 176 – was set to come into force on 1 October, which would kick off the process to allow operators to apply for licences. However, Kirk Schuring, chair of the Senate Select Committee on Gaming, said that a delay would allow all operators to begin on equal footing when the market opens.last_img read more