Posted on Leave a comment

Brick thrown through window of moving car

first_imgLinkedin WhatsApp NewsLocal NewsBrick thrown through window of moving carBy admin – September 12, 2012 535 Print Twitter AN O’BRIENSBRIDGE motorist had an horrific experience when a rock was fired at his car, shattering his window and cutting his arm.Anthony Hayes was driving past the railway tracks at Longpavement last week when a person jumped out and hurled a rock at his jeep.The window shattered and shards of glass came flying in, cutting his arm. Anthony’s wife, Leeanne Hayes, contacted the Limerick Post to warn other drivers about the incident.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up “It was dreadful. He was in complete and utter shock. Luckily, there was no-one behind him as he had to really break hard. It was a terrifying experience,” Leeanne said. The incident happened so quickly that Mr Hayes couldn’t see whether the person who threw the rock was an adult or not. The incident happened at around 9.30pm.Leeane said that her husband contacted the gardai to report the matter “and we were told this is not the first time this has happened along there. It was very traumatic and we wanted other drivers to be aware that this has happened along that road”.center_img Previous articleTwo convicted of soliciting sex from undercover gardaiNext articleParents and children warned of suspicious approaches admin Email Facebook Advertisementlast_img read more

Posted on Leave a comment

Small Pharmacies Crippled By State Switching Services To Ohio Company

first_imgU.S. Air Force Image ALBANY — A decision by the New York State Office For People With Developmental Disabilities to transfer institutional pharmacy services to an Ohio-based company will cripple small, local pharmacies, according to State Sen. George Borrello and Assemblyman Andrew Goodell.Borrello and Goodell are calling on the state and the agency to reconsider a decision to transfer services out of state.The decision will mean the loss of $30 to $40 million annually in revenues for independent pharmacies in the state, potentially causing the closure of many and shifting those taxpayer dollars out of New York State and into Ohio, the two lawmakers said.“Now, more than ever, the state should make it a priority to utilize New York State-based companies and small businesses to deliver critical services. Yet, this decision will achieve the opposite; it will actually take away business and revenue from independent pharmacies who have been providing vitally needed services to facilities in their areas for years. For many, it will result in the closure of their pharmacies and job losses, which will have a ripple effect in their communities,” Borrello said. In a letter to Governor Andrew Cuomo, Borrello pointed to an example of the devastating consequences of the decision. An independent, MWBE-owned pharmacy in his district has been providing subcontracted institutional pharmacy services to DDSO (Developmental Disability Service Office) facilities and patients for several years. The changeover means a dramatic loss of the pharmacy’s revenue and will lead to layoffs.Borrello and Goodell also underscored that the change will mean a diminished level of service for DDSO clients. The new pharmacy main point of service is more than two hours away from the communities to be served in Chautauqua and Cattaraugus counties, which will mean longer wait times (and likely, higher costs) for emergency medication deliveries. Specialized medical items, such as feeding devices and formulas, will also no longer be easily available, as the out-of-state provider does not supply these items.“This decision is a bad one for the often medically fragile DDSO clients who rely on the personalized and immediate service these independent pharmacies have provided. Now, they will be at the mercy of an out-of-state provider whose business model and service locations are ill-suited to their needs,” he added.“The state has an unfortunate track record of trying to cut costs through methods that ultimately prove to be more costly, such as its ill-conceived effort to centralize non-emergency medical transportation (NEMT), which was supposed to save the state money. Instead, transportation brokers ended up substituting public transit for single rider taxi services and costs skyrocketed by more than 1000 percent in some regions. By all accounts, this provider change is going down that same path,” said Senator Borrello.Goodell also noted that the Ohio company has been the subject of several lawsuits, including a recent one initiated by the U.S. Department of Justice. The DOJ has accused the pharmacy of putting the safety of patients at risk by filling prescriptions that had long expired or run out of refills. The allegation is the latest in a string of legal problems for the company. It settled federal lawsuits in 2016 and 2018 to resolve allegations of kickbacks.“The commitment of state funds to a corporation with ethical failings is an abdication of the state’s fiduciary duty to taxpayers. For these reasons and others, we are urging the state and OPWDD to reexamine and reverse this short-sighted decision,” said Goodell.Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Posted on Leave a comment

UK think tank suggests lead regulator for DC funds over merger

first_imgThe UK should consider allowing a single regulator to take the lead on defined contribution (DC) regulation but not pursue a merger of the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) with The Pensions Regulator (TPR).The Pensions Policy Institute (PPI) said it was unclear whether there would be benefits to the launch of a single regulator, rather than having trust-based schemes overseen by TPR and contract-based arrangements supervised by the FCA. However, it questioned why TPR had, in contrast to the FCA, no duty to protect the overall integrity of the pensions market and said that, in absence of a single regulator, one of the two bodies should be asked to lead on matters of pension regulation.Melissa Echalier, senior policy researcher at the PPI, noted that comparing the two regulatory regimes was difficult, as they were for types of provision that had developed over many years. “However, the implementation of automatic enrolment in which trust and contract-based pensions have been used for similar groups brings into contrast the two regulatory regimes, and it is clear they both have strengths that could helpfully be used by the other regulator,” she added.The PPI said the FCA’s focus on preventing adverse events was “valuable” when there were new and emerging priorities within the market, pointing to the growing importance of master trusts.The FCA’s current approach to authorisation and monitoring of companies is stricter than the rules applied to master trusts, regulated by TPR, the PPR noted, with interviewees contributing to the report warning that the lack of supervision risks leading to poorer outcomes for savers if a master trust is forced to wind up.The concerns around entry requirements for master trusts have not gone unnoticed by TPR.Its chief executive Lesley Titcomb recently hinted that the Master Trust Assurance Framework – so far only completed by four schemes – could be made mandatory for all providers.The acceptance by those interviewed by the PPI that merging regulators would not be “straightforward” echoes concerns by the government, with former pensions minister Steve Webb saying a single regulator was not one of his concerns.New pensions minister Ros Altmann has stood by remarks from both her predecessor Webb and Treasury ministers that the government was not considering further change.,WebsitesWe are not responsible for the content of external sitesLink to PPI report comparing regulatory regimes for DClast_img read more