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RSF unveils “shadow report” on press freedom in Eritrea

first_img EritreaAfrica Condemning abusesReports and statisticsProtecting journalistsInternational bodies PredatorsImprisonedFreedom of expressionUNESCO RSF_en Reports Follow the news on Eritrea Organisation Prisoner of Conscience Since 2001 – Why has Sweden not managed to bring Dawit Isaak home? RSF at the African Commission on Human and Peoples’ Rights in Banjul (Gambia) on 7 April 2016 Reporters Without Borders (RSF) accuses the Eritrean government of a complete denial of reality in its first-ever report to the African Commission on Human and Peoples’ Rights and announces that it has submitted an alternative “shadow report” with a much darker assessment of the state of press freedom in Eritrea. April 14, 2021 Find out more The government’s “initial national report” covering the period from 1999 to 2016 has to be seen to be believed. It says: “The fundamental principle in the National Charter, Eritrea’s Constitution of 1997 and the national codes and proclamations is that citizens have the right for lawful expression and opinion without interference.”The Eritrean government will present this report to the African Commission on Human and Peoples’ Rights on 28 and 30 April during the Commission’s 62nd ordinary session in the Mauritanian capital of Nouakchott.RSF’s shadow report, which was written by its Swedish section and was sent to the Commission, emphasizes the gulf between the situation described by the Eritrean authorities and the reality on the ground.“While the Eritrean government’s report is a first, it nonetheless constitutes a complete denial of reality,” said Arnaud Froger, the head of RSF’s Africa desk. “Freedom of expression and information is non-existent in Issayas Afeworki’s dictatorship, which is still Sub-Saharan Africa’s biggest jailer of journalists. Seventeen years after Eritrea shut down all independent media outlets, it is time to free the many journalists who are detained arbitrarily.”Is Dawit Isaak still alive? Isaak is a Swedish-Eritrean journalist who co-founded the newspaper Setit and was awarded UNESCO’s Guillermo Cano World Press Freedom Prize in 2017. Like many other Eritrean journalists, he has been detained for the past 17 years without ever being brought before a court, charged or tried. He has had no access to lawyer and his family has had no news of him since 2005. He was arrested on 18 September 2001 along with ten other politicians and journalists who were openly questioning the regime’s increasingly authoritarian tendencies. When asked by Radio France Internationale about “political prisoners” in an interview in 2016, Eritrea’s foreign minister said “all of them are alive” and that they would be tried “when the government decides.”Eritrea continues to be ranked second from last, 179th out of 180 countries, in RSF’s latest World Press Freedom Index. A handful of foreign reporters were allowed access to the capital, Asmara, under close escort on 2016 but only Radio Erena, a Paris-based radio station run by four Eritrean exile journalists, is able to provide independently reported news and information about Eritrea.Read our shadow report about press freedom in Eritrea here Receive email alerts Help by sharing this information Related documents shadow_report_eritrea_reporters_without_borders_2018.pdfPDF – 78.31 KB Reports News October 27, 2020 Find out more to go further January 13, 2021 Find out more RSF urges Swedish judicial authorities to reverse Dawit Isaak decision April 27, 2018 – Updated on July 12, 2018 RSF unveils “shadow report” on press freedom in Eritrea EritreaAfrica Condemning abusesReports and statisticsProtecting journalistsInternational bodies PredatorsImprisonedFreedom of expressionUNESCO News Swedish prosecutors again refuse to investigate Dawit Isaak caselast_img read more

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Council supports justice for ‘Magdalene’ women

first_imgEmail NewsLocal NewsCouncil supports justice for ‘Magdalene’ womenBy admin – July 7, 2011 528 JUSTICE for the thousands of women who were incarcerated in Magdalene laundries, including Limerick, has the backing of City Council. Cllr Maurice Quinlivan, referring to the proposals to decide how the government will respond to demands for an independent investigation into the Magdalene laundries, said:Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up “This is an opportunity to show support and to acknowledge the suffering of these women and the failure of the State to protect them and ensure that restitution is made”.He has submitted a Notice of Motion to support the Justice for Magdalenes Survivor Advocacy Group’s call on the State to offer a formal apology to survivors. The United Nations Committee Against Torture expressed its grave concern at the failure to protect the women and girls involuntarily confined in Magdalene laundries.Pointing out that thousands were placed in laundries in Limerick and across the State, Cllr Quinlivan said:“They were treated as prisoners, worked like slaves and were subjected to horrifying levels of physical and psychological abuse – these were so called fallen women held against their will and dehumanised by the people in charge. “It is now almost 20 years since the exhumation of remains of 155 women held in the Magdalene laundry in Drumcondra, many buried without names or death certificates, which led to the formation of the Magdalene Memorial Committee, now called Justice for the Magdalenes”.Referring to the previous government’s argument that as the laundries were privately owned and operated, they did not come under the terms of the Residential Institutions Redress Board, Cllr Quinlivan said that the United Nations Committee against Torture had been informed that the courts regularly sent women and girls to the laundries as an alternative to jail, while others were transferred from industrial schools, the responsibility of the State.Cllr Kieran O’Hanlon, who lived close to the Good Shepherd Convent in Limerick, cautioned against victimising all nuns, many of whom, he said, are now elderly.“They should not all be blackened – some of them were probably victimised also”. Cllr John Gilligan said there had been “good and bad in these institutions.“Some years ago, I was disturbed to discover that the biggest headstone in Mount St Lawrence Cemetery had no names inscribed. I drew this to the attention of the council and we succeeded in having 170 names of women who had been in the Limerick laundry inscribed.“I recall hearing of a young girl who was kidnapped off the streets in Limerick and put into the laundry – she disappeared behind walls, and I also think of the rich people in Limerick who had their shirts laundered by these girls and women – we all deserve criticism”. Advertisement Facebook Twittercenter_img ‘I was disturbed to discover that the biggest headstone in Mount St Lawrence Cemetery had no names inscribed….’ Print Linkedin WhatsApp Previous articleGrand Prix racing returns to city streetsNext article‘Until Bill produced, we’re debating a press release’ – Cllr Kennedy adminlast_img read more

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New proposal to support Limerick jobseekers with real jobs

first_imgSinn Féin believes that quality work experience programmes can provide a useful means of enhancing skills and providing a valuable first step into the world of work. They also claim that the current system displaces paid work, depresses wages and facilitates abuse by some employers.Cllr Quinlivan explained that as part of his party’s proposed scheme tailored internships would be developed sector by sector in full co-operation with trade unions and Education and Training Boards. Employers, he said, would be supported to be the best mentors that they can be. Facebook Twitter “We propose an internship scheme that supports jobseekers to attain real quality jobs without limiting the number of proper job vacancies available. Sinn Féin’s proposals maximise decent pay for decent work,” he said. Limerick Artist ‘Willzee’ releases new Music Video – “A Dream of Peace” Print NewsLocal NewsNew proposal to support Limerick jobseekers with real jobsBy Alan Jacques – February 26, 2015 662 Predictions on the future of learning discussed at Limerick Lifelong Learning Festival Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed live Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live TAGSCllr Maurice QuinlivanJobBridgelimerickLimerick jobsSinn Fein center_img WhatsApp by Alan [email protected] up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Cllr Maurice QuinlivanLIMERICK Sinn Féin councillor Maurice Quinlivan believes his party’s newly launched proposals on internships provide a credible, workable and thoroughly necessary alternative to the “despised” JobBridge scheme.Following the launch of Sinn Féin’s ‘Displacing JobBridge’ strategy for an alternative internship scheme this week, Cllr Quinlivan said that the JobBridge scheme launched by the Fine Gael and Labour Party Government in June 2011, was “an absolute disaster.”“While some individuals may have had a positive experience, it is a scheme that leaves thousands of jobseekers vulnerable to exploitation. It has already reduced the number of real job opportunities available and if it is not closed down now, thousands of new entry level positions that should come into being in the months and years ahead will emerge as unpaid internships instead,” he said.According to the City North councillor, Sinn Féin propose to replace the “one-size-fits-all” JobBridge scheme with a new participant centred model for internships. He also said that he envisages a substantial increase in the range of apprenticeships available.“The model we propose would not displace apprenticeships, paid in-work training or jobs. It would afford those genuinely in need of some work experience with meaningful learning opportunities.” Advertisement Previous articleMunster face Glasgow as Limerick sides meet in #UBLNext articleRattling good tales from The Boneyard bodies Alan Jacqueshttp://www.limerickpost.ie RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Linkedin Vanishing Ireland podcast documenting interviews with people over 70’s, looking for volunteers to share their stories WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads Emaillast_img read more

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Nominate the Vermont Chamber of Commerce “Citizen of the Year”

first_imgDo you know someone who continuously steps forward to help advance and strengthen our Vermont communities? Your ideal civic leader could be the next person to be honored with the statewide Vermont Chamber Citizen of the Year Award.Presented annually for nearly four decades, the Citizen of the Year award is given to a person who: 1) Has made major contributions to the betterment of Vermont; 2) Has distinguished himself or herself through outstanding service to the community; and 3) Typifies the true spirit of service and self-sacrifice in representing the finest ideal of Vermont Citizenship.The 2003 Citizen of the Year will be honored with a special recognition banquet in the fall. The application includes a nomination form, a brief biographical sketch of the nominee, and supporting testimonials. A Selection Committee comprised of Vermont Chamber Board Members and past award winners will select the winner.Last year’s Vermont Chamber Citizen of the Year was The Honorable Barbara W. Snelling. Other past winners include Judge Sterry Waterman (1983), Martha H. O’Connor (1994), Sister Elizabeth Candon (1985), Governor Thomas P. Salmon (1996), Francis G.W. Voigt (2000), and Diane P. Mueller (2001).Please contact Vicky Tebbetts, Vermont Chamber Vice President of Communications, with any questions or to receive a nomination form. ([email protected](link sends e-mail), 802-223-3443 ext 123). The deadline for nominations is July 15, 2003.last_img read more