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RSF unveils “shadow report” on press freedom in Eritrea

first_img EritreaAfrica Condemning abusesReports and statisticsProtecting journalistsInternational bodies PredatorsImprisonedFreedom of expressionUNESCO RSF_en Reports Follow the news on Eritrea Organisation Prisoner of Conscience Since 2001 – Why has Sweden not managed to bring Dawit Isaak home? RSF at the African Commission on Human and Peoples’ Rights in Banjul (Gambia) on 7 April 2016 Reporters Without Borders (RSF) accuses the Eritrean government of a complete denial of reality in its first-ever report to the African Commission on Human and Peoples’ Rights and announces that it has submitted an alternative “shadow report” with a much darker assessment of the state of press freedom in Eritrea. April 14, 2021 Find out more The government’s “initial national report” covering the period from 1999 to 2016 has to be seen to be believed. It says: “The fundamental principle in the National Charter, Eritrea’s Constitution of 1997 and the national codes and proclamations is that citizens have the right for lawful expression and opinion without interference.”The Eritrean government will present this report to the African Commission on Human and Peoples’ Rights on 28 and 30 April during the Commission’s 62nd ordinary session in the Mauritanian capital of Nouakchott.RSF’s shadow report, which was written by its Swedish section and was sent to the Commission, emphasizes the gulf between the situation described by the Eritrean authorities and the reality on the ground.“While the Eritrean government’s report is a first, it nonetheless constitutes a complete denial of reality,” said Arnaud Froger, the head of RSF’s Africa desk. “Freedom of expression and information is non-existent in Issayas Afeworki’s dictatorship, which is still Sub-Saharan Africa’s biggest jailer of journalists. Seventeen years after Eritrea shut down all independent media outlets, it is time to free the many journalists who are detained arbitrarily.”Is Dawit Isaak still alive? Isaak is a Swedish-Eritrean journalist who co-founded the newspaper Setit and was awarded UNESCO’s Guillermo Cano World Press Freedom Prize in 2017. Like many other Eritrean journalists, he has been detained for the past 17 years without ever being brought before a court, charged or tried. He has had no access to lawyer and his family has had no news of him since 2005. He was arrested on 18 September 2001 along with ten other politicians and journalists who were openly questioning the regime’s increasingly authoritarian tendencies. When asked by Radio France Internationale about “political prisoners” in an interview in 2016, Eritrea’s foreign minister said “all of them are alive” and that they would be tried “when the government decides.”Eritrea continues to be ranked second from last, 179th out of 180 countries, in RSF’s latest World Press Freedom Index. A handful of foreign reporters were allowed access to the capital, Asmara, under close escort on 2016 but only Radio Erena, a Paris-based radio station run by four Eritrean exile journalists, is able to provide independently reported news and information about Eritrea.Read our shadow report about press freedom in Eritrea here Receive email alerts Help by sharing this information Related documents shadow_report_eritrea_reporters_without_borders_2018.pdfPDF – 78.31 KB Reports News October 27, 2020 Find out more to go further January 13, 2021 Find out more RSF urges Swedish judicial authorities to reverse Dawit Isaak decision April 27, 2018 – Updated on July 12, 2018 RSF unveils “shadow report” on press freedom in Eritrea EritreaAfrica Condemning abusesReports and statisticsProtecting journalistsInternational bodies PredatorsImprisonedFreedom of expressionUNESCO News Swedish prosecutors again refuse to investigate Dawit Isaak caselast_img read more

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Violence against reporters during 11 days of protests in Armenia

first_img April 9, 2021 Find out more Receive email alerts April 25, 2018 Violence against reporters during 11 days of protests in Armenia to go further Forum on Information and Democracy 250 recommendations on how to stop “infodemics” Credit: Karen Minasyan / AFP News RSF calls for a fully transparent investigation after mine kills two journalists in Azerbaijan Help by sharing this information News Russian peacekeepers deny foreign reporters access to Nagorno-Karabakh RSF_en Follow the news on Armenia November 11, 2020 Find out more June 8, 2021 Find out more Reporters Without Borders (RSF) deplores the acts of violence against journalists during 11 days of anti-government protests in Yerevan, from 13 to 23 April, and calls on the Armenian authorities to ensure they do not go unpunished. The peaceful outcome to this “velvet revolution” – Serzh Sargsyan’s resignation as prime minister on 23 April – must not divert attention from the fact that some violence did take place and that at least 16 journalists and media workers were attacked, mainly by police officers, while covering the protests.“We condemn the unjustified use of force against journalists who were just doing their job,” said Johann Bihr, the head of RSF’s Eastern Europe and Central Asia desk. “The advent of a new era in Armenia must include abandoning such practices and combatting impunity. We urge the authorities to conduct full and impartial investigations into each of these attacks. All those responsible, whether police officers or not, must be brought to justice.”Several journalists were deliberately targeted by police while using cameras. Alina Sargsyan, a reporter for the CivilNet.am news website, was hit by a police officer while she filmed police arresting demonstrators. Azatutyun TV producer Anatoly Egiazaryan was beaten by several policemen while filming a demonstration being dispersed.Police damaged Factor.am reporter Vrezh Margaryan’s camera and smashed Radio Azatutyun reporter Nayra Bulgadaryan’s camera to the ground in order to prevent them from filming.Violence was used to prevent CivilNet.am reporter Tatul Hakobyan from filming the attempted arrest of the protest movement’s main leader, Nikol Pashinyan. Public radio reporter Liana Egiazaryan was injured by a stun grenade in similar circumstances. Ani Keshishyan of 168.am and Factor.am cameraman Hovhannes Sargsyan were injured by non-lethal weapons used during clashes between police and protesters.Violence by plainclothes police became more frequent as the protests in Yerevan grew in size. Many journalists reported being attacked by plainclothesmen. They included Ani Grigoryan of CivilNet.am, Arus Hakobiyan of Radio Azatutyun, Tehmine Yenokyan of Lragir.am and Artak Hulyan of Shant TV. Tirayr Muradyan, a reporter for the Sut.am news website, was badly beaten on 19 April by plainclothes police who did not like being filmed. The next day, police bundled him into a car to prevent him covering a demonstration on a motorway near Yerevan. After subsequently receiving orders to release him, they returned him to the place where they had arrested him.Factor.am editor-in-chief Arevik Sahakyan, his cameraman, Gevorg Martirosyan and public radio reporter Vruyr Tadevosyan were beaten up by unidentified individuals in different parts of the capital. In some cases, policemen looked on without making any attempt to intervene.A group of demonstrators also stormed into the Armenian public radio broadcaster’s headquarters on 14 April, demanding to be allowed to speak on the air. A studio door was broken. The police quickly launched a criminal investigation and arrested two suspects.Armenia is ranked 80th out of 180 countries in RSF’s 2018 World Press Freedom Index. News ArmeniaEurope – Central Asia Condemning abusesProtecting journalists ViolenceFreedom of expression News ArmeniaEurope – Central Asia Condemning abusesProtecting journalists ViolenceFreedom of expression Organisation last_img read more

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Council supports justice for ‘Magdalene’ women

first_imgEmail NewsLocal NewsCouncil supports justice for ‘Magdalene’ womenBy admin – July 7, 2011 528 JUSTICE for the thousands of women who were incarcerated in Magdalene laundries, including Limerick, has the backing of City Council. Cllr Maurice Quinlivan, referring to the proposals to decide how the government will respond to demands for an independent investigation into the Magdalene laundries, said:Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up “This is an opportunity to show support and to acknowledge the suffering of these women and the failure of the State to protect them and ensure that restitution is made”.He has submitted a Notice of Motion to support the Justice for Magdalenes Survivor Advocacy Group’s call on the State to offer a formal apology to survivors. The United Nations Committee Against Torture expressed its grave concern at the failure to protect the women and girls involuntarily confined in Magdalene laundries.Pointing out that thousands were placed in laundries in Limerick and across the State, Cllr Quinlivan said:“They were treated as prisoners, worked like slaves and were subjected to horrifying levels of physical and psychological abuse – these were so called fallen women held against their will and dehumanised by the people in charge. “It is now almost 20 years since the exhumation of remains of 155 women held in the Magdalene laundry in Drumcondra, many buried without names or death certificates, which led to the formation of the Magdalene Memorial Committee, now called Justice for the Magdalenes”.Referring to the previous government’s argument that as the laundries were privately owned and operated, they did not come under the terms of the Residential Institutions Redress Board, Cllr Quinlivan said that the United Nations Committee against Torture had been informed that the courts regularly sent women and girls to the laundries as an alternative to jail, while others were transferred from industrial schools, the responsibility of the State.Cllr Kieran O’Hanlon, who lived close to the Good Shepherd Convent in Limerick, cautioned against victimising all nuns, many of whom, he said, are now elderly.“They should not all be blackened – some of them were probably victimised also”. Cllr John Gilligan said there had been “good and bad in these institutions.“Some years ago, I was disturbed to discover that the biggest headstone in Mount St Lawrence Cemetery had no names inscribed. I drew this to the attention of the council and we succeeded in having 170 names of women who had been in the Limerick laundry inscribed.“I recall hearing of a young girl who was kidnapped off the streets in Limerick and put into the laundry – she disappeared behind walls, and I also think of the rich people in Limerick who had their shirts laundered by these girls and women – we all deserve criticism”. Advertisement Facebook Twittercenter_img ‘I was disturbed to discover that the biggest headstone in Mount St Lawrence Cemetery had no names inscribed….’ Print Linkedin WhatsApp Previous articleGrand Prix racing returns to city streetsNext article‘Until Bill produced, we’re debating a press release’ – Cllr Kennedy adminlast_img read more

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Saif Hassan fined Rs 21,600 for not renewing his India visa

first_imgAdvertisement jxNBA Finals | Brooklyn Vs48c0Wingsuit rodeo📽Sindre E1ln5( IG: @_aubreyfisher @imraino ) 9laiwdWould you ever consider trying this?😱tkCan your students do this? 🌚dsRoller skating! Powered by Firework An expired visa can cost you Rs 21,600 even if you are a famous cricketer. After the Day-Night Test match held at the Eden Gardens in Kolkata on Wednesday ended, Bangladeshi cricketer Saif Hassan could not board the flight with his team members to go back home. His visa expired two days back, and failure of renewal cost him a hefty fine.Advertisement The Kolkata airport authorities had him stay back until his visa was processed by the Indian High Commission. Advertisement  Since Hassan already had a six-month India visa, the Bangladesh cricket board arranged visas for the other Test players except him.  But he was allowed to board a flight to Bangladesh after he was cleared by the Indian High Commission. Advertisement  Bangladesh’s Deputy High Commissioner Toufique Hassan spoke to the media, “His (Hassan) visa expired two days ago, and he realised it only at the airport. He could not board the booked flight. As per the new rules of overstay, he had to pay the fine. Thankfully the Indian High Commission processed his visa and gave him the exit clearance, and he left for home yesterday.” He was the back-up opener for Bangladesh cricket team, but due to a split webbing, he could not take part in the match. While half of the team flew back home the very same day the match ended, the rest including Hassan was scheduled to board the flight on Monday, but because of his expired visa, he stayed back for one more day before flying back home on Wednesday. Advertisementlast_img read more