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moe. Performs Intimate Acoustic Set At Garcia’s [Full Audio/Gallery]

moe. spent their weekend at Port Chester, NY’s The Capitol Theatre, celebrating the holiday season with their first-ever, two-night Famoe.ly Holiday Concert series. “Two night” may not be the best phrase, because yesterday’s performance was actually played during the light of day, as an acoustic brunch set at Garcia’s – the smaller venue adjacent to the main Cap room.After a night spent in the main hall debuting new originals and dusting off tunes from their Seasons Greetings album, the band brought out the acoustics and worked through a very fun performance. They opened with some classics, “Not Coming Down > Wormwood > Okayalright,” and included a few holiday tunes in their setlist with “Hey It’s Christmas” (a debut), “Together at Christmas” and “Blue Christmas.” There was also time for an acoustic “Chromatic Nightmare,” as well as the show’s finale, an acoustic version of their new favorite cover song, “Jump Around.”Listen to the full audio below, courtesy of taper Brian V. You can also see a full gallery of the two night stand below, courtesy of Capacity Images.Setlist: moe. | Garcia’s at The Capitol Theatre | Port Chester, NY | 12/4/16Set: Not Coming Down > Wormwood > Okayalright, Hey, It’s Christmas#, Shoot First, McBain, Together At Christmas*##, Dead Flowers, Nebraska, Chromatic Nightmare, Blue Eyed Son, Blue Christmas^, Tambourine, Faker > MothEnc: Jump AroundNotes:# FTP## LTP > 12/12/13^ LTP > 12/08/12 Load remaining images read more

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A speedier solution for molecular biomedical research

first_imgThe recorded spectrogram, however, only contains very indirect information about the molecular structures, making analyzing and identifying those molecules a complex pattern-recognition problem. If the patterns aren’t recognized or previously known, it can take days or months of trial and error to put together an answer, because ordinary computers must make those computations one at a time.Using a quantum system takes advantage of its ability to access and calculate faster, and makes use of a mathematical construct known as Hilbert space and the higher processing power of qubits. One qubit can be two traditional values at once, a pair can be four, and so on. The problem with the current or intermediate quantum computers, though, is that all that computing power accumulates a lot of noise, making the whole calculation inaccurate.Hybrid algorithms have been proven to be an effective bridge to solve for this, so the researchers thought they might work here, too. In the paper, they describe how their hybrid algorithm uses classical statistical methods, like Bayesian machine learning, to cluster and refine the search to correct for errors brought on by the quantum part of the algorithm, leading to the correct molecule.“There are three parts to the paper,” said Sels. “All three ingredients are necessary because if you leave out the first part where we restrict ourselves to these clusters of physical molecules, then basically you’ll start in some place that’s so far away from where you actually want to end up that you’ll be searching for it forever. And then in the last part, the same thing: If you don’t do it cleverly, then the noise levels of your quantum computer will be so high, they’ll just be going in circles — you’ll be randomly searching.”They tested the algorithm using simple molecules that had only four quantum spins and had already been identified, so they knew whether the algorithm worked. The researchers hope to expand the algorithm’s capability so it can analyze and identify more-complex molecules. They also believe the algorithm can be extended to solve for other types of spectroscopic analysis using existing quantum computers.“It probably took us 20 or so years to get to the current stage of development of quantum computing hardware,” Sels said. “The road ahead to quantum computers that can do error correction and are good enough to be plug-and-play devices is presumably equally as long. If we don’t have applications for these intermediate or current state-of-the-art machines, then we might face a quantum winter.”Harvard’s Office of Technology Development has protected the intellectual property associated with this work and is exploring possible commercialization opportunities.This work was supported by the Harvard Quantum Initiative, the National Science Foundation, the Army Research Office, the Harvard-MIT Center for Ultracold Atoms, and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. Dries Sels is a senior postdoctoral fellow of the Research Foundation – Flanders in Belgium. A process called NMR spectroscopy that is often used to find and identify small molecules in biological samples such as blood and urine has become a powerful diagnostic tool for medical professionals, helping identify biomarkers of specific diseases and disorders.But the technique has its limits, especially when researchers need to identify molecules that haven’t been catalogued already — that is, the vast majority of them.A trio of doctors and medical researchers from Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School wanted to make this complicated and time-consuming process a lot simpler, and hoped quantum physics could help. They figured that since the basics of NMR, short for nuclear magnetic resonance, is grounded in quantum mechanics, then perhaps a quantum computer could help push the technique beyond the current limits set by using ordinary computer processors to interpret the data.The researchers from the Medical School enlisted a pair of quantum physicists from the Faculty of Arts and Sciences to help. Now, the combination of medical researchers and quantum scientists have published the results of their collaboration — a new algorithm for decoding signals from NMR readings that draws from both quantum computing and classical machine learning — in a new study in Nature Machine Intelligence.The hybrid algorithm does, in theory, just what the researchers hoped. It would reduce a process that can take days for classical computers days into just minutes by using quantum systems that run on only 50 to 100 quantum bits, or “qubits,” the fundamental building blocks on which these computers operate. In other words, the algorithm works on both quantum computers that already exist and the so-called “near-term” quantum computers now being developed. These machines would act as a bridge between the intermediate period of current error- (or “noise-”) prone machines and the error-correcting, perfected versions envisioned to become reality decades from now.The researchers believe the new hybrid algorithm can be one of the first applications for the not-so-distant intermediate computers, helping fill a growing need in practical applications of quantum technology as the hardware catches up with the theory. Quantum computers use the mysterious properties of matter at extremely small scales to greatly advance processing power and perform calculations that are virtually impossible for ordinary computers to solve.In recent years, finding useful applications for existing or near-term quantum computers has been a central challenge for researchers, said Eugene Demler, professor of physics and one of the paper’s co-authors.“We should not just think of applications for perfect quantum computers. We should think of applications of quantum computers for the near future,” Demler said. “It’s important to realize that we can use these non-perfect computers — these noisy, intermediate-scale quantum computers — to already study what’s important for biomedical research.”The algorithm has only just passed the proof-of-concept stage, according to the paper, but it opens a door to possibilities in chemical, medical, and biological research using NMR if it can be expanded beyond the tests the researchers outlined.Take blood, for example, said paper co-author Samia Mora, an associate professor of medicine at the Medical School and a cardiovascular medicine specialist at the Brigham. “We know there are thousands of molecules in the bloodstream, but right now with NMR we probably only measure about 200 [of them],” she said. “In the future, ideally, we would be able to expand this algorithm to be able to solve for this problem of what are these molecules in the bloodstream beyond the ones that we already know.”Doctors could then base treatments, like cancer therapy, off those readings, or they could prescribe preventative measures if a patient has small molecules in his or her blood that correspond with heart disease. The readings could also help in drug discovery or vaccine research.“Having a better understanding of the molecular signatures of diseases or treatments is really very impactful for many areas across many, many different disciplines,” Mora said.Other Harvard researchers who worked on the study included Hesam Dashti, a research fellow at the Brigham and HMS, Olga Demler, an associate biostatistician at the Brigham and assistant professor at HMS, and Dries Sels, Demler’s postdoctoral fellow and the lead author of the study.Sels and Demler had been searching for an opportunity like the one presented in the paper. They wanted a crack at a problem that has real-world applications, is hard for classical computers, yet could be solved using existing and near-term quantum computers. Quantum-assisted NMR spectroscopy checked all the boxes since the readings, called a spectrogram, are put together by measuring a complex set of quantum spins.For example, to get a spectrogram, biological samples are placed inside a machine that has a magnetic field and are then bombarded with radio waves to excite the nuclear magnetic properties in the molecules. The NMR machine reads those spins as different signatures. Harvard Quantum Initiative Co-Director Lukin on ‘quantum supremacy’ and Google’s announcement of its achievement Related A platform for stable quantum computing, a playground for exotic physics Toward an unhackable quantum internet Riding the quantum computing ‘wave’ Researchers create quantum calculator Recent research settles a long-standing debate Researchers demonstrate the missing link for a quantum internet New system could shed light on a host of complex processes last_img read more

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After failed Trump romance, France seeks reset under Biden

first_imgPARIS (AP) — U.S. President Joe Biden and French President Emmanuel Macron agreed Sunday to work closely together to fight the coronavirus pandemic and climate change. Their first conversation since Biden’s inauguration aimed at mending ties between the historic allies that frayed under Donald Trump. Biden “stressed his commitment to bolstering the transatlantic relationship” via NATO and the EU. The U.S. and French leaders see eye-to-eye on the importance of international cooperation to fight climate change and COVID-19 and in negotiating with Iran. But Macron’s office said the two wouldn’t shy away from thorny issues like trade disputes or taxing digital companies such as Google or Amazon.last_img

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Lysol Maker: Don’t Drink Our Cleaning Products

first_imgVia rb.comNEW YORK – The company that makes Lysol has an urgent message to its customers: do not to consume our cleaning products.It comes after President Trump suggested the possibility of injecting disinfectants to protect people from Coronavirus.The suggestion came Thursday during the White House Coronavirus Task Force news briefing.Reckitt Benckiser, a British company, warned Friday human consumption of disinfectant products is dangerous. “Under no circumstance should our disinfectant products be administered into the human body through injection, ingestion or any other route,” the company said in a statement.They issued the statement after, “recent speculation and social media activity.” Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Gavin Lee, Chris McCarrell & More Are New Stars of B’way’s Les Miz

first_imgLook out for new feisty innkeepers, hopeless romantics, botched haircut victims and more! Beginning March 3, the Broadway revival of Les Miserables will welcome five new leads at the Imperial Theatre: Tony and Olivier Award nominee Gavin Lee as Thenardier, current ensemble member Chris McCarrell as Marius, Wallace Smith as Enjolras, Erika Henningsen as Fantine, Brennyn Lark as Eponine and Rachel Izen as Madame Thenardier. They will take over for Cliff Saunders, Andy Mientus, Kyle Scatliffe, Caissie Levy, Eponine understudy Brittney Johnson and Keala Settle respectively. Show Closed This production ended its run on Sept. 4, 2016 Related Shows Based on the classic novel by Victor Hugo, Les Miserables is written by Alain Boublil and Claude-Michel Schonberg, with lyrics by Herbert Kretzmer, original French text by Boublil and Jean-Marc Natel, an original adaptation by Trevor Nunn and John Caird, and additional material by James Fenton. The musical premiered on Broadway in 1987 and was revived previously in 2006. Lee received Tony and Olivier nods for his performance as Bert in Mary Poppins; he also appeared in the West End in Contact, Oklahoma!, Crazy For You and Me & My Girl. McCarrell was recently seen on screen as a Lost Boy in Peter Pan Live!; Les Miz marks his Broadway debut. Smith’s Broadway credits include Rocky, Godspell, American Idiot, The Lion King, Hair and Ragtime. Les Miz will mark the Broadway debuts for both Hennigsen and Lark. Izen returns to the Great White Way after appearing in Mary Poppins. She was seen on the London stage in Thoroughly Modern Millie, Lautrec and Annie.center_img Tony nominee Ramin Karimloo will continue in the role of Jean Valjean through the summer. The current cast also includes Tony nominee Will Swenson as Javert and Samantha Hill as Cosette. The role of Eponine is currently played by Erin Clemons, who steps in temporarily following Tony winner Nikki M. James’ departure earlier this month. Johnson begins performances as Eponine on February 10. Les Miserables View Commentslast_img read more

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Confirmed Ghana Premier League signings for second round

first_img#GhPL Second Transfer WindowConfirmed Deals so far… Players In EBUSUA DWARFS– Justice Asabire Mensah (Eleven Wise)– Christopher Bonney (Asante Kotoko)– Gilbert Fiamenyo (Hearts of Oak)– Agya Fuseini (Berlin FC)– Stephen Bentil (UCC Youngsters)– Ebenezer Ackon (UCC Youngsters)– Richard Arhin (Elmina Sharks) TECHIMAN CITY FC– Ransford Cudjoe (Tano Bofoakwa)– Kweku Osei (Unattached)– Adu Gyamfi (DC United)– Mohammed Basha (AK Shion)– Derrick Gyamfi  (Platini FC)– Prince Korsah (DC United) INTER ALLIES FC– Isaac Ossae (Al Orubah – Saudi Arabia)– Salifu Sayeed (Akosombo Krystal Palace)– Abraziz Abankwah (Hearts of Oak)– Yakubu Musa (Hearts of Oak)– Francis Osei (Danbort FC) ASANTE KOTOKO SC– Agyemang Duah (KFC Samosa)– Emmanuel Gyamfi (Wa All Stars)– Emmanuel Osei Carlos (Ashanti Gold SC)– Seidu Bancey (Smouha SC) DREAMS FC– Maxwell Arthur (Dream Academy)– Isaac Ansah (Dream Academy)– Daniel Adade (Istanbul FC)– Michael Sarpong (Liberty Profs.)– Philemon McCarthy (WAFA SC)– Abeiku Ainoonson (Asante Kotoko)– Theophilous Annorbaah (Unattached) WEST AFRICA FOOTBALL ACADEMY– Komlan Agbegniandan (AS Togo Port – Togo)– Elvis Amoh (Asante Kotoko) HEARTS OF OAK– Kassenu Ghandi (El Merreikh – Sudan)– Patrick Razak (Tamale Utrecht)– Marcus Badu (Auroras) BECHEM UNITED– Hans Kwoffie (Al Orobah – Oman)– Alfred Nelson (Yarmouk Sports – Kuwait) WA ALL STARS– Roger Dakurah (Ankara SC)– Mahmoud Musah (Simple Winners)– Hashim Musah (Real Tamale Utd)– Adraman Yahaya (Tudu Mighty Jets)– Benjamin Asiedu (Mobile Phone People) ADUANA STARS– Nathaniel Asamoah (Raja Casablanca)– Kenneth Owusu (Tema Youth FC) BEREKUM CHELSEA– Gabriel Ayaala (Wa All Stars)– Nana Tei Horsu (Wa All Stars)– Frank Osei (Vita Club)– Gyan Appau (Akosombo Stars)– Daniel Boateng (Wa All Stars)– Eric Ametepe (Berekum Arsenals)– Wahab Sannie (Unattached) LIBERTY PROFESSIONALS– Emmanuel Antwi (Liberty Professionals U20)– Derrick Appiah (AS Monaco B – France)– Frederick Ansah (Charity Stars)– Kennedy Agya Kofi (Liberty Professionals U20)– Kennedy Ashia (Al Hilal – Sudan) ASHANTI GOLD SC– Ciba Hudu (Sun City FC)– Martin Zila (Neco FC) NEW EDUBIASE UNITED– Bismark Idan (Unattached) MEDEAMA SC– Amos Korankye (Sekondi Hasaacas) SEKONDI HASAACAS– Theophilous Nana Awortwe (ASC Nasr Zem Zem)– Tennyson Opoku (ASC Nasr Zem Zem)– Daniel Boateng (WAFA SC)– Ricky Adjei Mensah (Ebusua Dwarfs)– Justice Blay (Eleven Wise)– Steven Ackah (Unicorn FC)– Roger Lamptey (ASC Nasr Zem Zem)  –Follow Joy Sports on Twitter: @JoySportsGH. Our hashtag is #JoySportslast_img read more