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Tablets all round from Age Friendly Limerick

first_imgLocal backlash over Aer Lingus threat Shannon Airport braced for a devastating blow Linkedin RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Housing 37 Compulsory Purchase Orders issued as council takes action on derelict sites TAGSCommunityLimerick City and Countylocal newsNews Facebook Twitter Email Advertisementcenter_img Limerick on Covid watch list Print Mary Cronin, from Croom, Chair of the Limerick and National Network of Older Peoples’ Councils, taking a selfie with Cllr James Collins, Mayor of Limerick City and County.Photo by Diarmuid GreeneWHEN Age Friendly Limerick says “we have a tablet for that” they don’t mean a little bottle of pills.More than 30 older people from across County Limerick have been presented with special electronic tablets as part of a programme to reduce incidents of social isolation and open up a new world of communication.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Age Friendly Limerick, which is co-ordinated by Limerick City and County Council, in partnership with Cliffrun Media are delivering the project aimed at reducing levels of social isolation among older people, through the use of the Acorn Tablet.The Acorn is a specialised tablet, tailored to address the needs of seniors in a closed secure network. It opens up a world of relevant online content for seniors, encouraging users to engage and interact at both social and commercial level. Its design is built around five content and application pillars: independence, health, finance, communications and security.Pictured during a workshop hosted by Limerick City and County Council are Claire O’Gorman, Carmel Wilmott and Joan Curtin, all from Newcastle West, Co. Limerick.Photo by Diarmuid GreeneAnd its ease of use will be welcomed by anyone who is not particularly familiar with on-line technology.The interface is simple to navigate, provides easy access to a help button as well as providing remote technical assistance when required.A user can start with only one or two apps loaded and, over time, additional elements can be added according to the users individual preferences.The idea is that by becoming connected to what’s going on in their area, older people will be better able to attend local events or ask for a lift. It will also make it easier to do their online banking, or pay a bill.And they can connect with their children, friends or family members living abroad through SkypeA major element of this project will be engagement between the older people and Transition Year students from Desmond College in Newcastle West.Five intergenerational workshops will connect old and young and provide an opportunity for the younger people to support the older people in the use of technology.Deputy Mayor Michael Collins said: “In a world which is becoming more technology driven, it is important that we support and encourage our older citizens in embracing the digital world.  It is fantastic that we are using technology to help make people fell less isolated.”Age-Friendly Limerick Programme Manager Anne Rizzo, said that the Acorn is a very user friendly tablet, designed to open up a world of digital services for older people and is aimed at encouraging social inclusion, putting people in contact with others in their community and helping them to avail of services and information not otherwise easily accessible to them.Funding has been provided by the Department of Community and Rural Affairs covering the cost of the tablets, including sim card and technical backup for the duration of the programme trial period. WhatsApp TechPost | Episode 9 | Pay with Google, WAZE – the new Google Maps? and Speak don’t Type! Is Aer Lingus taking flight from Shannon? Previous articleLimerick v Tipperary to be televised as eirSport unveil Allianz League coverageNext articleColourful makeover for city rehab unit Bernie Englishhttp://www.limerickpost.ieBernie English has been working as a journalist in national and local media for more than thirty years. She worked as a staff journalist with the Irish Press and Evening Press before moving to Clare. She has worked as a freelance for all of the national newspaper titles and a staff journalist in Limerick, helping to launch the Limerick edition of The Evening Echo. Bernie was involved in the launch of The Clare People where she was responsible for business and industry news. NewsCommunityLocal NewsTablets all round from Age Friendly LimerickBy Bernie English – January 16, 2019 1515 last_img read more

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Rebel Yell

first_imgThe right-wing street rallies that have erupted across the South have largely focused on white supremacy and symbols of the Confederacy, but scratch the surface and you’ll also find opposition to environmental laws and public lands such as national forests and parks.The Sagebrush Rebellion, a loosely confederated political coalition that’s been around since the 1970s, opposes any public lands owned by the federal government. The Sagebrush movement saw a new push into the mainstream with the 2014 standoff at Cliven Bundy’s Nevada ranch, and again in 2016 when Bundy’s sons led the 40-day occupation of Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in Oregon. The Malheur incident set off a revival, with militias joining in to take part and show support there.Groups from the South participated in the standoffs out West, and now some of them have brought that ideology back to Eastern public lands. Those groups include the Oath Keepers, a group of current and former military and law enforcement members that claims membership of about 30,000, and the Three Percent United Patriots.“There’s no reason the federal government should own any land,” said John Pruitt, Virginia leader of the Three Percent United Patriots. “When you let the federal government own something in a state, now they have leverage over you. When they pass our laws and say, ‘Believe what we believe or we’re not going to give you money for roads or lands,’ you become a slave to the federal government. The federal government has a role to play in our nation, but it’s growing into a monster, and if we’re not getting involved, it’s going to devour us.”Sagebrush ideology and Confederate iconography both are touchpoints in militia culture, linked by their common ties to anti-federal sentiment. In western Virginia, members of the Three Percent hold an annual Confederate flag ride. The 2016 edition of the ride, known as “Rebel-lution,” was attended by Jeanette Finicum, the widow of LaVoy Finicum, a militia member who was killed at Malheur.Ryan Lenz, senior writer for the Southern Poverty Law Center’s Intelligence Project, says the anti-government Sagebrush Rebellion has a “long history of turning environmental and land-use issues into a rallying point for recruiting.”One of the forerunners of the Sagebrush Rebellion was a militia known as the Posse Comitatus, which formed in the late ’60s, refusing to recognize any authority above the county level. From the beginning, its core members also were involved with Christian Identity, a racist and anti-Semitic sect based around white supremacy.James Corcoran, an associate professor at Simmons College who has written two books about the militia movement, says there typically are three elements to a militia or patriot group: an ideological focus such as opposing the federal government or public lands or upholding white supremacy; the militaristic aspect of drilling and openly carrying arms; and a religious element based around protecting Christianity.“There’s the idea that big government is taking out land from us,” explains Corcoran. “You also have the cultural component, that the intellectuals are ruling us from Washington. There’s the perception that people are trying to take away guns and land and get rid of white Christian America.”The Sagebrush Rebellion’s anti-government, anti-public lands sentiment is especially prevalent in areas with a lot of national parks and forests. Eighty percent of North Carolina’s Swain County, for example, is owned by the National Park Service, the U.S. Forest Service, the Tennessee Valley Authority, and a Cherokee Indian reservation.A 1981 New York Times story looking at whether the early Sagebrush movement might go East included this: “County residents reportedly have set fire to land in the Great Smokies as a way of harassing the Park Service. Like their angry counterparts in the West, Swain County residents talk about wanting to turn Park and Forest Service land over to state or private ownership.”The same story also reported opposition to public lands protection from residents of West Virginia’s Randolph County, about a quarter of which is national forest. Recently, twelve counties in Western North Carolina have passed anti-wilderness resolutions as part of the ongoing Pisgah-Nantahala National Forest management planning process.Ironically, many militia and Sagebrush groups use public lands for gatherings. White supremacist and militia meetings have taken place at Tennessee’s Norris Dam State Park, Fall Creek Falls State Park, Davey Crockett State Park, and Cumberland Mountain State Park. One group, American Renaissance, which according to the SPLC “promotes pseudo-scientific studies and research that purport to show the inferiority of blacks to whites,” has booked facilities at Tennessee’s Montgomery Bell State Park for six years in a row.Mike Robertson, director of operations for Tennessee State Parks, said the agency is obligated to provide for public access to parkland regardless of ideology, while also providing opportunities for protesters to voice their opposition.Public lands are already under assault by the Trump Administration, which has rolled back protections and designations for national monuments. Sagebrush groups in the South—often allied with hunting organizations and state agencies—are aiming to increase privatization of public lands, especially national forests like the Pisgah-Nantahala, whose management plan is being re-written this year.So far, Sagebrush Rebellion groups are doing what many comfortable conservationists and outdoor enthusiasts have not: getting actively and personally involved in the public lands fight.last_img read more

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Bad day for No. 1s: Djokovic, Osaka upset at Indian Wells

first_imgDjokovic and Philipp Kohlschreiber resumed their third-round match that was suspended because of rain a night earlier. The unseeded German knocked off the five-time tournament champion 6-4, 6-4.Osaka lost to Belinda Bencic 6-3, 6-1 in just over an hour in the fourth round of the first title defense of her career.“She sort of came out there really aggressive,” Osaka said. “She sort of knew what she wanted to do more than me.”Since Osaka won the title at Indian Wells a year ago, she won the U.S and Australian Opens. Her triumph in Australia made her No. 1 for the first time, but her time at the top has been rocky. Osaka fired her coach and lost in the first round in Dubai before taking on a new coach, Jermaine Jenkins, who came on court during the match.“It’s always a bit tricky whenever you change someone in the team, but I feel like for a first tournament we did really well,” Osaka said. “We communicate well, so I think that’s a really big plus. I don’t think it’s going to be difficult.”On Tuesday, the 23rd-ranked Bencic served and returned better.Venus Williams reached the quarterfinals with a 6-4, 6-4 win over Mona Barthel. She’ll next face No. 8 Angelique Kerber, who beat No. 9 Aryna Sabalenka 6-1, 4-6, 6-4.“I haven’t played that much, so I wanted to make it count,” said Williams, who is ranked No. 36 and expects to play about 12 tournaments this year. “I need to do what I want, and what I want is to play the tournaments I want to play.”The bottom half of the men’s draw still includes No. 2 seed Rafael Nadal and fourth-seeded Roger Federer, both of whom breezed to victory.Nadal eased by 25th-seeded Diego Schwartzman 6-3, 6-1, while Federer defeated Swiss countryman Stan Wawrinka 6-3, 6-4.“Overall it’s not been easy playing Stan,” Federer said. “He feels the same way, so that’s very awkward sometimes.”Djokovic owned an 8-1 record against Kohlschreiber, who beat a No. 1 player for the first time.Kohlschreiber liked the weather — sunshine and temperatures in the low 70s — much better than the cold and rain on Tuesday night.“I liked my chances more at night against Kohlschreiber, but it wasn’t to be last night,” Djokovic said. “Completely different conditions today. I congratulate him for playing tactically really well and getting me out of my comfort zone. He deserved to win.”The 35-year-old German started thinking he had a chance early in the first set when he survived a handful of break points on his serve.“I would say after 3-all in the first set I felt like getting closer to the set, holding my service games, which is not easy against Novak, because he’s such a great returner,” Kohlschreiber said. “I know from that point on it’s going to be a very interesting match.”Djokovic was just 1 for 5 on break-point opportunities. Kohlschreiber converted three of his four chances.Next up for Kohlschreiber is Gael Monfils, who owns a 13-2 record against the German.Djokovic remains alive in doubles with partner Fabio Fognini. Djokovic returned about an hour after his loss for their match.“When I hit a good return, I was wondering why this didn’t happen in singles,” he said.Also ousted were No. 6 Kei Nishikori, No. 10 Marin Cilic and No. 14 Daniil Medvedev.In women’s fourth-round matches, No. 2 Simona Halep lost to Marketa Vondrousova 6-2, 3-6, 6-2; and No. 7 Kiki Bertens was beaten by 20th-seeded Garbine Muguruza 5-7, 6-1, 6-4.Bianca Andreescu, an 18-year-old Canadian, beat 18th-seeded Wang Qiang 7-5, 6-2.___More AP Tennis: https://apnews.com/apf-Tennis and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports Naomi Osaka, of Japan, reacts after losing a game to Belinda Bencic, of Switzerland, at the BNP Paribas Open tennis tournament Tuesday, March 12, 2019 in Indian Wells, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill) INDIAN WELLS, Calif. (AP) — It was a tough day for seeded players at the BNP Paribas Open on Tuesday, with Novak Djokovic and Naomi Osaka, the world’s top-ranked players, ushered out in the desert.last_img read more