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Tablets all round from Age Friendly Limerick

first_imgLocal backlash over Aer Lingus threat Shannon Airport braced for a devastating blow Linkedin RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Housing 37 Compulsory Purchase Orders issued as council takes action on derelict sites TAGSCommunityLimerick City and Countylocal newsNews Facebook Twitter Email Advertisementcenter_img Limerick on Covid watch list Print Mary Cronin, from Croom, Chair of the Limerick and National Network of Older Peoples’ Councils, taking a selfie with Cllr James Collins, Mayor of Limerick City and County.Photo by Diarmuid GreeneWHEN Age Friendly Limerick says “we have a tablet for that” they don’t mean a little bottle of pills.More than 30 older people from across County Limerick have been presented with special electronic tablets as part of a programme to reduce incidents of social isolation and open up a new world of communication.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Age Friendly Limerick, which is co-ordinated by Limerick City and County Council, in partnership with Cliffrun Media are delivering the project aimed at reducing levels of social isolation among older people, through the use of the Acorn Tablet.The Acorn is a specialised tablet, tailored to address the needs of seniors in a closed secure network. It opens up a world of relevant online content for seniors, encouraging users to engage and interact at both social and commercial level. Its design is built around five content and application pillars: independence, health, finance, communications and security.Pictured during a workshop hosted by Limerick City and County Council are Claire O’Gorman, Carmel Wilmott and Joan Curtin, all from Newcastle West, Co. Limerick.Photo by Diarmuid GreeneAnd its ease of use will be welcomed by anyone who is not particularly familiar with on-line technology.The interface is simple to navigate, provides easy access to a help button as well as providing remote technical assistance when required.A user can start with only one or two apps loaded and, over time, additional elements can be added according to the users individual preferences.The idea is that by becoming connected to what’s going on in their area, older people will be better able to attend local events or ask for a lift. It will also make it easier to do their online banking, or pay a bill.And they can connect with their children, friends or family members living abroad through SkypeA major element of this project will be engagement between the older people and Transition Year students from Desmond College in Newcastle West.Five intergenerational workshops will connect old and young and provide an opportunity for the younger people to support the older people in the use of technology.Deputy Mayor Michael Collins said: “In a world which is becoming more technology driven, it is important that we support and encourage our older citizens in embracing the digital world.  It is fantastic that we are using technology to help make people fell less isolated.”Age-Friendly Limerick Programme Manager Anne Rizzo, said that the Acorn is a very user friendly tablet, designed to open up a world of digital services for older people and is aimed at encouraging social inclusion, putting people in contact with others in their community and helping them to avail of services and information not otherwise easily accessible to them.Funding has been provided by the Department of Community and Rural Affairs covering the cost of the tablets, including sim card and technical backup for the duration of the programme trial period. WhatsApp TechPost | Episode 9 | Pay with Google, WAZE – the new Google Maps? and Speak don’t Type! Is Aer Lingus taking flight from Shannon? Previous articleLimerick v Tipperary to be televised as eirSport unveil Allianz League coverageNext articleColourful makeover for city rehab unit Bernie Englishhttp://www.limerickpost.ieBernie English has been working as a journalist in national and local media for more than thirty years. She worked as a staff journalist with the Irish Press and Evening Press before moving to Clare. She has worked as a freelance for all of the national newspaper titles and a staff journalist in Limerick, helping to launch the Limerick edition of The Evening Echo. Bernie was involved in the launch of The Clare People where she was responsible for business and industry news. NewsCommunityLocal NewsTablets all round from Age Friendly LimerickBy Bernie English – January 16, 2019 1515 last_img read more

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The EPA at 40

first_imgNovember’s broad election gains for House and Senate Republicans do not equal a mandate to roll back hard-won protections for the environment, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Lisa Jackson said Friday (Dec. 3) at Harvard Law School (HLS).The EPA’s aggressive work to clean up the environment during the Obama administration’s first two years has made it a target for the ire of some Republicans, Jackson said. But she argued that the same voters who put those Republicans in office also approved numerous ballot measures protecting the environment in their home states.“No candidate ran on a promise to put more pollution in our air and water, and no one was sent to Congress with a mandate to increase health risks for our children,” Jackson said.Jackson was the keynote speaker in the School’s Ames Courtroom during an all-day conference marking the 40th anniversary of the EPA’s creation. The event was sponsored by the Harvard University Center for the Environment (HUCE), the Law School, the Harvard Kennedy School (HKS), and the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) . Among the speakers and panelists was former Vice President Al Gore, who addressed the luncheon.President Drew Faust (from left) talks with EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson, former Vice President Al Gore, and Harvard Law School Dean Martha Minow.Jackson said that the EPA has been aggressive under her leadership but that critics who argue that environmental protection and economic development can’t coexist are wrong. Despite repeated predictions of economic doom from industry groups when significant protection legislation has been passed, those industries have endured and the economy has continued to grow. In fact, Jackson said, regulations have provided the inducement for innovations such as the catalytic converter, replacement chemicals for ozone-killing chlorofluorocarbons, and an industrial sector dedicated to producing “green” products.“President Obama has insisted that the choice between our economy and our environment is indeed a false choice,” Jackson said. “We’ve been more than happy to prove him right.”The EPA’s past successes have provided a series of environmental protections that the public would be loath to part with, Jackson said. Among them are removing lead from gasoline and the air, reducing acid rain, providing the scientific foundation for secondhand-smoke regulations, cleaning rivers and water supplies, halting the widespread use of the pesticide DDT, increasing vehicle efficiency, and controlling toxic substances.“This list represents million of lives saved and trillions of dollars in health benefits,” Jackson said. “These changes touched the life of every single American since 1970. … This list represents things the American people would refuse to do without.”One of the more contentious challenges lying ahead involves action on climate change. A 2007 U.S. Supreme Court decision in Massachusetts v. EPA cleared the way for EPA action on such change under the Clean Air Act. The case determined that carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases emitted by vehicles are indeed pollutants and therefore subject to EPA regulation. In 2009, the EPA released an “endangerment finding” under the Clean Air Act, saying that greenhouse gases can threaten public health and the environment and that emissions from motor vehicles contribute to air pollution that endangers public health.One of the panels explored the ramifications of those actions and the extent to which the EPA can regulate greenhouse gases without major climate change legislation, which is stalled in Congress.The panel, led by HUCE Director Dan Schrag, Sturgis Hooper Professor of Geology and professor of environmental science and engineering, featured EPA Deputy Administrator Bob Perciasepe, Archibald Cox Professor of Law at Harvard Law School Jody Freeman, Executive Director of the Natural Resources Defense Council Peter Lehner, and EPA Associate Administrator Lisa Heinzerling.Perciasepe said that with more sweeping climate change legislation stalled, there are still actions that can be taken under the Clean Air Act to address the emissions of greenhouse gases.“If we can’t do the big thing, we should do something, and the Clean Air Act is a way to do something,” Perciasepe said.The EPA already has taken other steps, such as the Energy Star appliance program, to use less fuel — and thus emit fewer greenhouse gases — through efficiency.Freeman said that a piecemeal approach that fully uses the executive branch’s powers to make rules and regulations under existing laws, such as the Clean Air Act, and that takes advantage of state and local efforts to fight climate change could actually make significant reductions. That goal would require, though, that multiple efforts on many fronts all be successful, she said, even in the face of opposition lawsuits and moves in Congress to weaken or block action through legislation. One unsung but critical strategy will likely involve “playing defense” against current and future action in the courts and Congress, Freeman added.While those actions could help the nation reach interim greenhouse gas reduction targets, the only way to reach long-term goals, Freeman said, is to pass more comprehensive climate change legislation.A piecemeal approach that fully uses the executive branch’s powers to make rules and regulations under existing laws, such as the Clean Air Act, and that takes advantage of state and local efforts to fight climate change could actually make significant reductions, contends Harvard Law School Professor Jody Freeman.last_img read more

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Brazilian Military and U.S. Researchers Recreate Historic Expedition

first_img Explorers battle insects, hunger and fatigue In 1956, a part of Brazil’s Amazonian region was renamed in his honor, becoming known as the Federal Territory of Rondônia; it achieved statehood in 1982. Col. Hiram is a living legend in Brazil: aboard a kayak, he has traversed 11,300 of the 23,000 kilometers of Amazonian rivers. Due to the restriction imposed by the indigenous tribe, the researchers were unable to travel the 184 kilometers “that were considered the most difficult stretch of the original expedition,” Col. Hiram said. However, aside from this minor incident, the new journey down the Roosevelt River was peaceful – much different from the journey that took place a century ago. “I wrote a historiography of the rivers; I verified everything that had been written or said about them,” said Col. Hiram, who is also a professor at the Military College in Porto Alegre, in the state of Rio Grande do Sul. Brazil invited Roosevelt to command the expedition After 59 days without seeing another human face outside of the team, the expedition finally arrived at an inhabited site. Upon spotting the two canoes, the riverside inhabitants ran away, thinking that they were about to be attacked by an indigenous tribe, since until then no one had dared to explore that path. Due to the restriction imposed by the indigenous tribe, the researchers were unable to travel the 184 kilometers “that were considered the most difficult stretch of the original expedition,” Col. Hiram said. However, aside from this minor incident, the new journey down the Roosevelt River was peaceful – much different from the journey that took place a century ago. In 1914, Brazilian Army Colonel Cândido Mariano da Silva Rondon and former United States President Theodore Roosevelt led an extraordinary adventure. Together, they commanded the Roosevelt-Rondon Scientific Expedition, whose mission was to plot the course of an unexplored river in Brazil’s Amazon region: the Duvida River, (River of Doubt). When they completed the mission despite much adversity, the river was christened with a new name: Roosevelt River. Meanwhile, another threat from within their own team compounded the danger: as supplies ran low, a strong Soldier known as Júlio began to steal food. He was caught by Sergeant Manoel Vicente da Paixão, of the Corps of Engineers, and reprimanded; in response, Júlio grabbed a rifle and shot the Sergeant, killing him, and fled through the brush. Roosevelt and Rondon buried the sergeant in the forest; Júlio disappeared. “I wrote a historiography of the rivers; I verified everything that had been written or said about them,” said Col. Hiram, who is also a professor at the Military College in Porto Alegre, in the state of Rio Grande do Sul. By Dialogo June 02, 2015 “We used the same means as the original expeditions. There were no motorboats, and we traveled down [the Roosevelt River] using paddles [in kayaks or canoes], camping and cooking,” said Marc Meyers, a materials sciences professor from the University of California–San Diego. The four researchers traveled down 581 kilometers of the Roosevelt River in 22 days, from October 22-November 13, 2014. After less than a month, a tragedy befell the team: expedition member Antônio Simplício da Silva was dragged into the water and disappeared forever when one of the boats was carried away by the currents down a waterfall and sank. Roosevelt’s son, Kermit, who was in the same canoe, was able to save himself with great difficulty. After less than a month, a tragedy befell the team: expedition member Antônio Simplício da Silva was dragged into the water and disappeared forever when one of the boats was carried away by the currents down a waterfall and sank. Roosevelt’s son, Kermit, who was in the same canoe, was able to save himself with great difficulty. The trip became more hostile every day. Of the seven original canoes, only two survived. Provisions were lost. The group was constantly under siege from poisonous ants, bees, wasps, snakes, centipedes, and scorpions, and hunted by indigenous people. The explorers were ill, hungry, and exhausted. One of the most dramatic moments occurred when Roosevelt injured his leg; the wound became infected, and the former president developed very high fever, forcing the expedition to interrupt their journey. Roosevelt called Col. Rondon and told him that he could go no further, begging to be left behind. Obviously, this request was not granted. Not knowing what they would encounter, the group of 22 men chose heavy wooden canoes, which would prove unfit for crossing the rapids and the 11 waterfalls they found. The alternative was to open a 10-kilometer path through the rain forest, portaging seven canoes fashioned from tree trunks and carrying nearly a ton of supplies. The group was exposed to all sorts of insects, including mosquitoes carrying tropical diseases, and spied on by indigenous people who had never had contact with Western civilization. One of the expedition dogs was found dead, struck by an arrow. Col. Rondon is promoted; Roosevelt writes book The four researchers traveled down 581 kilometers of the Roosevelt River in 22 days, from October 22-November 13, 2014. Legendary figure recreates journey Col. Rondon was promoted to general and, in 1955, when he was 90, Brazil’s National Congress awarded him the title of Field Marshal, the highest rank in the Brazilian Army. For his pioneering work in defense of indigenous peoples, he came to be known as the “Marshal of Peace.” “We used the same means as the original expeditions. There were no motorboats, and we traveled down [the Roosevelt River] using paddles [in kayaks or canoes], camping and cooking,” said Marc Meyers, a materials sciences professor from the University of California–San Diego. Legendary figure recreates journey In 1913, Roosevelt held conferences throughout South America when he was invited by the Brazilian government to command the expedition. The Minister of Foreign Relations at the time, Lauro Müller, said that the American statesman would help raise Brazil’s profile abroad. The expedition was recorded in photographs and journals written by Roosevelt, Col. Rondon, and other team members, including Brazilian Captain Amílcar Armando Botelho de Magalhães. Historians disagree on the dates of the expedition; some say it lasted two months and others say it took eight months. But all agree that the trip was a harrowing ordeal that nearly cost Roosevelt his life. A century after the Roosevelt-Rondon Scientific Expedition, two Brazilian Service Members and two U.S. researchers recreated the journey to commemorate the historic adventure and to document the environmental changes that have occurred in the meantime. The trip became more hostile every day. Of the seven original canoes, only two survived. Provisions were lost. The group was constantly under siege from poisonous ants, bees, wasps, snakes, centipedes, and scorpions, and hunted by indigenous people. The explorers were ill, hungry, and exhausted. One of the most dramatic moments occurred when Roosevelt injured his leg; the wound became infected, and the former president developed very high fever, forcing the expedition to interrupt their journey. Roosevelt called Col. Rondon and told him that he could go no further, begging to be left behind. Obviously, this request was not granted. Meanwhile, another threat from within their own team compounded the danger: as supplies ran low, a strong Soldier known as Júlio began to steal food. He was caught by Sergeant Manoel Vicente da Paixão, of the Corps of Engineers, and reprimanded; in response, Júlio grabbed a rifle and shot the Sergeant, killing him, and fled through the brush. Roosevelt and Rondon buried the sergeant in the forest; Júlio disappeared. “We lost two days because the Cinta-Larga tribe did not allow us to travel in an area of the river that went around their reservation,” Col. Hiram said. Professor Meyers, who was born in Brazil, came up with the idea of “The Roosevelt-Rondon Expedition: 100 years later.” The others involved in the project are retired Colonel Hiram Reis e Silva, a Brazilian Army Department of Education and Culture researcher; retired Brazilian Army Colonel Ivan Carlos Gindri Angonese; and U.S. documentarian Jeffrey Lehmann, the producer of the Public Broadcasting Service (PBS) television program Weekend Explorer. After 59 days without seeing another human face outside of the team, the expedition finally arrived at an inhabited site. Upon spotting the two canoes, the riverside inhabitants ran away, thinking that they were about to be attacked by an indigenous tribe, since until then no one had dared to explore that path. In 1914, Brazilian Army Colonel Cândido Mariano da Silva Rondon and former United States President Theodore Roosevelt led an extraordinary adventure. Together, they commanded the Roosevelt-Rondon Scientific Expedition, whose mission was to plot the course of an unexplored river in Brazil’s Amazon region: the Duvida River, (River of Doubt). When they completed the mission despite much adversity, the river was christened with a new name: Roosevelt River. That’s where the expedition came to its end. Roosevelt, Rondon, and their team had traversed 750 kilometers of waterways and had mapped the course of the river, which until then was unknown. Roosevelt returned to the United States and wrote the story of the expedition in the book “Through the Brazilian Wilderness,” published in 1914; but his health never fully recovered from the journey, and he died Jan. 6, 1919. Brazil invited Roosevelt to command the expedition A century after the Roosevelt-Rondon Scientific Expedition, two Brazilian Service Members and two U.S. researchers recreated the journey to commemorate the historic adventure and to document the environmental changes that have occurred in the meantime. Not knowing what they would encounter, the group of 22 men chose heavy wooden canoes, which would prove unfit for crossing the rapids and the 11 waterfalls they found. The alternative was to open a 10-kilometer path through the rain forest, portaging seven canoes fashioned from tree trunks and carrying nearly a ton of supplies. The group was exposed to all sorts of insects, including mosquitoes carrying tropical diseases, and spied on by indigenous people who had never had contact with Western civilization. One of the expedition dogs was found dead, struck by an arrow. “We lost two days because the Cinta-Larga tribe did not allow us to travel in an area of the river that went around their reservation,” Col. Hiram said. In 1913, Roosevelt held conferences throughout South America when he was invited by the Brazilian government to command the expedition. The Minister of Foreign Relations at the time, Lauro Müller, said that the American statesman would help raise Brazil’s profile abroad. The expedition was recorded in photographs and journals written by Roosevelt, Col. Rondon, and other team members, including Brazilian Captain Amílcar Armando Botelho de Magalhães. Historians disagree on the dates of the expedition; some say it lasted two months and others say it took eight months. But all agree that the trip was a harrowing ordeal that nearly cost Roosevelt his life. Explorers battle insects, hunger and fatigue Professor Meyers, who was born in Brazil, came up with the idea of “The Roosevelt-Rondon Expedition: 100 years later.” The others involved in the project are retired Colonel Hiram Reis e Silva, a Brazilian Army Department of Education and Culture researcher; retired Brazilian Army Colonel Ivan Carlos Gindri Angonese; and U.S. documentarian Jeffrey Lehmann, the producer of the Public Broadcasting Service (PBS) television program Weekend Explorer. Col. Rondon is promoted; Roosevelt writes book Col. Hiram is a living legend in Brazil: aboard a kayak, he has traversed 11,300 of the 23,000 kilometers of Amazonian rivers. That’s where the expedition came to its end. Roosevelt, Rondon, and their team had traversed 750 kilometers of waterways and had mapped the course of the river, which until then was unknown. Roosevelt returned to the United States and wrote the story of the expedition in the book “Through the Brazilian Wilderness,” published in 1914; but his health never fully recovered from the journey, and he died Jan. 6, 1919. Col. Rondon was promoted to general and, in 1955, when he was 90, Brazil’s National Congress awarded him the title of Field Marshal, the highest rank in the Brazilian Army. For his pioneering work in defense of indigenous peoples, he came to be known as the “Marshal of Peace.” In 1956, a part of Brazil’s Amazonian region was renamed in his honor, becoming known as the Federal Territory of Rondônia; it achieved statehood in 1982. A very important issue full of details involving courage and fearlessness to adversity in order to establish the sovereignty of a giant by nature; suffering and lives lost. It is very touching that Roosevelt, when injured, asked to be left behind in the middle of the green expanse of uninhabited forest while knowing that it was virtually impossible for them to return. Our respect and reverence to all of these men. Excellent news Thank you, Aquino.Excellent report. A big, friendly hug from this canoeist in the eternal search for the Third Riverbank.Hiram Reislast_img read more

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New edition of Istra Gourmet 2019-2020 presented

first_imgEXCELLENT NEW PROMOTIONAL VIDEO OF ISTRIA / LIFE AS IT SHOULD BE IN ISTRIA! THE STORY BEHIND THE NEW DESTINATION PORTAL OF ISTRIAN TOURISM And the new 23rd edition of this popular publication has just been published. In this way, Istra Gourmet combines several key projects aimed at promoting indigenous Istrian cuisine and excellent delicacies, through the selection of the best restaurants in Istria, projects within wine tourism and olive oil tourism, and an additional aspect is the promotion of typical local products. truffles, prosciutto, cheese and honey. RELATED NEWS: The publication Istra Gourmet, one of the most sought after and most popular tourist promotional materials in Istria issued by the Istria County Tourist Board, contains almost 500 useful addresses where it is possible to arrange tastings of the best wines, extra virgin olive oils, prosciutto, cheese, truffles and all kinds of specialties in restaurants. , taverns or agrotourism.  The guide is designed in Croatian, Italian, German and English, is printed in a circulation of 300.000 copies and can be downloaded at all info points of tourist boards throughout Istria or downloaded in pdf format at www.istra.com or attached The guide through the gourmet offer of the peninsula brings detailed information about the richness of the eno-gastronomic offer, and in addition to an overview of the most important Istrian gastronomic products, it contains an exhaustive and precise list of restaurants and taverns. Attachment: Istria Gourmet 2019-2020 ISTRIA GOT ITS TIME OUT GUIDE – TIME OUT ISTRIA 2019last_img read more

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Dems undermining our democracy

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionThe Democratic Party and the Republican Party are fighting a political war. The Republicans are fighting a conventional war with a structured chain of command, political generals, and political ground troops that for the most part follow the political general’s orders. On the other side, the Democrats are fighting an unconventional war; there is no “front” or “rear,” an attack can come from anywhere,, including inside the enemy’s leadership.The Democrats led by the progressive movement are dangerous to our republic because they go any lengths and nothing will hold them back. They’ve assimilated the Marxist conception of enlisting the masses and, like the Communists, they are beyond the conventional notion good and evil.Only the Marxists’ methods of war are efficient. While we are fighting “Russian collusion,” some men were being paid a fat fee for betraying us to the progressives’ advantage: a collection of perverted journalists and highly placed officials, untrustworthy generals and shady politicians.Former President Obama has set up a group called “Organization for Action” (OFA). OFA is working to disrupt everything that our current president is trying to do. The aim is to keep the country divided so it can attain its goal of turning the country into a socialist society. This organization goes against our democracy and Constitution. When the progressives take power, we can all say goodbye to the best country ever created by man. Wake up, America before it’s too late.Rafael PoloNorthvilleMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsBroadalbin-Perth’s Tomlinson seizing the day by competing in cross country and golf this fallEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?last_img read more

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It’s carnival time in Miami!

first_imgIt’s finally carnival weekend in Miami-Dade County and that means bacchanal time.The 34th annual Miami Carnival will conclude in spectacular style this weekend with music, fashion and culture. On Friday night, it was all about steel-pan, as Panorama 2018 came to the Central Broward Regional Park in Lauderhill,  Florida on Friday, October 5th from 4-11 p.m.  Revelers enjoyed the sweet sounds of world-renowned steel bands as they competed for the crown of Panorama Champion 2018.On Saturday morning, October 6th, get ready for J’Ouvert with 25 participating mas bands that will bring the mud, paint, powder and pure bacchanal from 7 a.m. until 3 p.m. Grand culminationAnd of course, on Sunday, October 7th, the annual Caribbean Carnival season culminates with a cultural spectacle from 11 a.m. -11p.m. at the Miami-Dade County Fairgrounds, 10901 SW 24th St, Miami, FL 33165. Over 17 masquerade bands will compete for prizes, pageantry and bragging rightsConcert goers will be able to catch live performances from Kes The Band, Patrice Roberts, Shurwayne Winchester, Teddyson John, Dil E Nadan, King Bubba, Peter Ram, Stiffy, Ricardo Drue, Trinidad & Tobago Prison Band, P Goodz, Prime Ethic, Soca Empress J, Scrappy, Rudy Live, Mr. Pearly, Julien Believe, Kiprich, Tara Lynne, Sweet Shells and Imma Haitian 257 while DJ Chosen, DJ Spice, DJ Dorenzo, Survivor International, DJ Stichiz and DJ The Party General will drop the latest beats to keep fans rocking. Rapper Flo Rida is set to make a special appearance. For tickets and more information see miamibrowardcarnival.com.last_img read more

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Mayor of Wilton Manors Suddenly Dies at 41

first_imgJustin Flippen, the mayor of Wilton Manors, died suddenly Tuesday. Flippen was 41. He was elected mayor in 2018 after serving 10 years as a city commissioner. City officials said that Flippen apparently was driving to Tuesday evening’s City Commission meeting when he became ill and died.Like all of us who knew him, I am devastated by the news of Justin Flippen’s passing. Justin was a fine public servant, a wonderful person, and a dear friend. My thoughts are with his family as we all mourn this tragic loss. May Justin rest in peace. https://t.co/eL7Woc4xFR— Rep. Ted Deutch (@RepTedDeutch) February 26, 2020 A spokesperson for the city of Wilton Manors confirmed the news of Flippen’s passing and said those close to him said he suffered a “medical episode.”last_img

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Virender Sehwag reckons Virat Kohli will outdo all of Sachin’s records except one

first_imgAdvertisement arrqNBA Finals | Brooklyn Vs263Wingsuit rodeo📽Sindre Eyitz( IG: @_aubreyfisher @imraino ) bxa5qfWould you ever consider trying this?😱a67uCan your students do this? 🌚5s9ntRoller skating! Powered by Firework Legendary Indian attacking batsman Virender Sehwag feels Virat Kohli is the best batsman of this generation. In an interview at New Delhi he stated that when the Indian skipper is on form, he is unstoppable. And that if he continues to increase his batting prowess and hunger for runs, he will break at least a few of Tendulkar’s monumental records. Kohli, who scored two back-to-back centuries in the recently concluded ODI series against the West Indies, has 43 ODI centuries to his name and just needs seven more to break Sachin Tendulkar’s world record of 49 centuries.Advertisement “At the moment, Virat (Kohli) is the best batsman. The way he is scoring centuries, the way he is scoring runs, he is the best. I am sure he will break most of Sachin Tendulkar’s records,” Virender Sehwag told in an interview.Advertisement While the ‘Master-Blaster’ scored 18426 runs in his ODI career at an average of 44.83, Kohli has a staggering average of 60.31 in 239 ODIs. However, in Test cricket the captain of the ‘Men in Blues’ is way behind of Tendulkar’s centuries record with Kohli on 25 centuries (77 Tests), 26 behind the record 51 centuries (200 Tests) by Sachin.“But there is one record no one can break. That is, his (Sachin) 200 Test matches record. I don’t think anyone can play more than 200 Test matches,” Sehwag added.Advertisement Advertisementlast_img read more