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Soldiers influx could put strain on barracks

first_imgWhatsApp Twitter Advertisement CONCERNS have been raised among Defence Forces representatives about an expected influx of new and transferred personnel without a corresponding spend on facilities at Sarsfield Barracks in the city. Under the new organisational proposals, the Defence Forces are reducing the number of brigades which they have, and will be moving hundreds of personnel from some areas of the country to others. No personnel are expected to be moved from Limerick but it is anticipated that several hundred soldiers from Cork may be transferred to Sarsfield Barracks.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up In addition to this, the force is currently recruiting to expand its ranks by 600 in various disciplinesBut the Permanent Defence Force Other Ranks Representative Association (PDFORRA,) says there is confusion about the move and has warned that infrastructure and facilities could come under pressure with the influx to Limerick city.“We would expect that this will not all happen at once, it will be over a period of time so, initially, the barracks and existing personnel in Limerick should be able to cope,” Gerry Rooney, General Secretary of PDFORRA, told the Limerick Post.But he added that further down the line, there may be serious pressure on the facilities an space at the barracks unless the department spends money on upgrading and facilitating in some areas.PDFORRA says it is “unclear” at this point whether defence personnel are going to be told where to go or if they will have choices.“We want to see our members having choice because there are many who might want to relocate to Limerick.“We don’t want to see people forced into anything. We also want to see them being given a choice of upskilling or retraining. There are some areas where we don’t have enough qualified personnel and others where we have too man. It’s a matter of matching one to the other,” Mr Rooney said.Reducing the number of personnel engaged in headquarters, admin and allied support tasks is a central element to the reorganisation process, according to PDFORRA Linkedin Facebookcenter_img NewsLocal NewsSoldiers influx could put strain on barracksBy admin – August 22, 2012 818 Print Email Previous articleLimerick to Galway train not on right trackNext articleDeirdre Lawlor has… The X Factor adminlast_img read more

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Press release: HS2 Phase Two Managing Director update

first_img Phase Two has come a long way under Paul’s leadership. Phase 2a, the section from Birmingham to Crewe, is already in Parliament and is on course to receive Royal Assent next year. Phase 2b, the section from Birmingham to Leeds and from Crewe to Manchester, is well advanced in terms of its preparation for Parliament, particularly how it integrates with the existing network and the plans of Northern Powerhouse Rail. The working draft environmental statement for Phase 2b will be published later this autumn. We are grateful to Paul for the progress he has made with Phase Two and wish him and his family well in their new adventure. The press and media enquiries line is for accredited journalists only Contact form https://www.hs2.org.uk… Phase Two is critical to HS2’s goal of changing the economic geography of Britain, by bringing the towns and cities of the Midlands and the North closer together. Paul has played a vital part in moving that concept nearer to reality. Given its sheer scale and duration, changes of personnel and leadership are inevitable in a project such as HS2, particularly given the global demand for talented and experienced engineers such as Paul, but our focus remains on delivering a railway for the long term future of this country. And that we will do. Seeing HS2 move considerably closer to reality has been a privilege and will always have a special place in my career. HS2 is vital for the future of Britain and I will always be proud to have been part of its development. Paul will be leaving to take on the role of Program Director, leading the programme management team, on the $40 billion Metrolinx program in Toronto, the largest public transit investment in Canadian history. Paul, along with his family, will move to Canada at the end of the year. Paul joined HS2 Ltd in 2015 and has been responsible for working with central government and local stakeholders to plan and develop the route for Phase Two.HS2 Ltd’s CEO, Mark Thurston, said:center_img HS2 Ltd’s Chairman, Sir Terry Morgan, said: Paul will leave HS2 Ltd at the end of December and plans are now in train to find his successor. Paul Griffiths said: Press and media enquirieslast_img read more

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OED reflects on issues of discrimination, harassment

first_imgThe Office of Equity and Diversity is twice as large since the Los Angeles Times first reported on sexual assault incidents that occurred during former USC gynecologist George Tyndall’s career. (Joelle Tenderich/Daily Trojan) Since the Los Angeles Times published its investigation on former campus gynecologist George Tyndall’s allegedly misconduct-riddled career, Jividen said that the office has doubled in size. Currently, there are eight investigators and typically about 40 to 50 cases open at a time, covering a wide range of issues such as sexual harassment and discrimination. During the event, discussion surrounding Tyndall’s alleged misconduct dominated most of the conversation. Many female faculty and staff members present spoke out about systemic sexism instilled in American culture. Jividen continued to emphasize the importance of addressing any kinds of issues on campus. “I’m looking forward to building and contributing to the [diversity and inclusion] work here at the University and building it enough to not have to be its own week or a special thing,” Crenshaw said. “I can see the long-term vision of the [Diversity and Inclusion] week is bringing that work [to say], ‘We’ve done all of this, and how can we push it further? How can we continue to grow and expand and make it open and honest for everybody?’ Because diversity and inclusion is a whole umbrella.” “Who is going to have the guts to report that kind of behavior, knowing that their job is on the line or their colleague’s job is on the line or something like that?” Jividen said. “We have to feel like the institution is going to be responsive to your concerns.” OED Director John Jividen led the discussion and represented the office during the event. The OED is responsible for investigating cases of protected-class discrimination and harassment in the USC community. Various women at the event emphasized the need for proper new-hire training at USC, citing that power dynamics in many professional relationships among faculty members and with students can ultimately pose a problem. “[The goal] is to start a conversation about equity and inclusion on campus and just get people talking about these issues more, meeting people that are like-minded and want to learn more about this and engage in this important conversation,” Jividen said. The USC Office of Equity and Diversity hosted a public meeting Tuesday to address ongoing patterns of discrimination and harassment cases on campus. The event, titled “What We Have Learned: The Ramifications of Not Having Difficult Conversations,” was part of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Week and stressed the importance of having open conversations about the current challenges facing the University. “Don’t talk about it, be about it,” said Erika Crenshaw, a project specialist in the Information Technology Services department who attended the event. “[The OED should] show me that things have changed. Actions speak louder than words.” “We’re missing one big component and that’s the difficulty to have these conversations,” he said. “People feel [the] administration isn’t responsive and hasn’t been responsive to bad misconduct and behavior in the past,” Jividen said. “The hope is that with the proper resources and the proper attention, we will move forward onto a better path after the things that have gone wrong in the past years.” Attendees discussed how the OED has an obligation to address incidents of discrimination and misconduct sooner and more carefully. Jividen said an incident of someone saying the N-word took six months to investigate. Jividen discussed instances of inappropriate behavior, racism and sexism that have been ignored for decades at the University. During his presentation, Jividen discussed four examples of misconduct that have occurred on campus. These include a senior administrator hearing sexual comments from a subordinate, a manager hearing someone use a racial slur, colleagues describing a faculty member as “tyrannical and offensive” and a faculty member friending a student on social media and chatting with her.last_img read more

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Bionic man Richardson back on track at Burhill

first_img Yorkshire’s Alan Richardson proved himself the bionic man as he came out on top in the England Golf Captains’ Tournament played over two days at Burhill Golf Club in Surrey. Sporting two knee replacements, the Scarborough North Cliff member won the event with 81 Stableford points, finishing three ahead of Hugh Purvis from Long Ashton in Bristol with another Yorkshireman Neil Windle from Wath-upon-Dearne third with 76. Richardson, 57, his club’s captain in 2011, laid the foundation for his success by scoring 42 points in round one before adding 39 in the second. “I didn’t have much confidence going into the tournament,” he said. “I was pulling all my shots left but I had a lesson from my club professional Fraser Kelly and he put me right. “I can’t thank him enough or Mark Andrews, the surgeon at Scarborough Hospital who operated on my knees. Before they were sorted out I couldn’t complete 18 holes and had to use a buggy. “I had the right knee done two years ago and the left early this year. I was sidelined for nine weeks so this win is mind-blowing.” Playing off a handicap of ten, Richardson made his presence felt from the start, coving the front nine in round one in level par including a birdie at the seventh after firing a five iron to a foot. That gave him 23 points and he added a further 19 on the homeward stretch despite bogeys at the closing four holes. “I started the second round badly,” he continued. “I was in the last group out and feeling a bit edgy but I managed to score 17 points with one blob. So I gave myself a talking to at the turn.” It worked as he came home with 22 points, finishing par-bogey-par-par. “Neil pushed me all the way and kept me going. It was a good battle,” Richardson confirmed. “I’ve won a couple of tournaments at my club and in the Scarborough Alliance but never anything like this before,” he added. “Last year in this event at West Lancs I finished third two points behind the winner. “This is also prestigious for my club. I’ve already received a few messages of congratulations from members even though I didn’t realise they knew anything about it. But they said they had been following the scores on the England Golf website.” Leading final scores (Stableford points): 81 A Richardson (Scarborough North Cliff) 42 39; 78 H Purvis (Long Ashton) 36 42; 76 N Windle (Wath upon Dearne) 39 37; 75 P Ashcroft (Gathurst) 34 41; 72 P Luker (Waterfront) 34 38; 71 S Fairbank (Hessle) 35 36 31 Oct 2014 Bionic man Richardson back on track at Burhill last_img read more

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Saif Hassan fined Rs 21,600 for not renewing his India visa

first_imgAdvertisement jxNBA Finals | Brooklyn Vs48c0Wingsuit rodeo📽Sindre E1ln5( IG: @_aubreyfisher @imraino ) 9laiwdWould you ever consider trying this?😱tkCan your students do this? 🌚dsRoller skating! Powered by Firework An expired visa can cost you Rs 21,600 even if you are a famous cricketer. After the Day-Night Test match held at the Eden Gardens in Kolkata on Wednesday ended, Bangladeshi cricketer Saif Hassan could not board the flight with his team members to go back home. His visa expired two days back, and failure of renewal cost him a hefty fine.Advertisement The Kolkata airport authorities had him stay back until his visa was processed by the Indian High Commission. Advertisement  Since Hassan already had a six-month India visa, the Bangladesh cricket board arranged visas for the other Test players except him.  But he was allowed to board a flight to Bangladesh after he was cleared by the Indian High Commission. Advertisement  Bangladesh’s Deputy High Commissioner Toufique Hassan spoke to the media, “His (Hassan) visa expired two days ago, and he realised it only at the airport. He could not board the booked flight. As per the new rules of overstay, he had to pay the fine. Thankfully the Indian High Commission processed his visa and gave him the exit clearance, and he left for home yesterday.” He was the back-up opener for Bangladesh cricket team, but due to a split webbing, he could not take part in the match. While half of the team flew back home the very same day the match ended, the rest including Hassan was scheduled to board the flight on Monday, but because of his expired visa, he stayed back for one more day before flying back home on Wednesday. Advertisementlast_img read more