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Radio journalist missing for nearly one month

first_imgNews May 5, 2021 Find out more August 7, 2003 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Radio journalist missing for nearly one month Organisation MexicoAmericas RSF_en News April 28, 2021 Find out more Follow the news on Mexico May 13, 2021 Find out more Help by sharing this information center_img 2011-2020: A study of journalist murders in Latin America confirms the importance of strengthening protection policies Reporter murdered in northwestern Mexico’s Sonora state Reports News Reporters Without Borders today voiced deep concern about the fate of journalist Jesus Mejía Lechuga of Radio MS-Noticias in Martínez de la Torre (in the southeastern state of Veracruz), who has been missing for almost one month.In a letter to Vera Cruz state governor Miguel Alemán Velázco, the organisation’s secretary-general Robert Ménard called for a thorough investigation to locate the journalist and determine the causes of his disappearance, and asked to be kept informed of progress in the enquiry.Mejía was last seen on 12 July when he interviewed Alfonso Alegretti, a representative of the opposition Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI) in the local municipal government.In his programmes “A Primera Hora” and “Voz y Palabra,” Mejía had accused Guillermo Zorilla Pérez, a PRI representative in the federal parliament, of being linked to local drug traffickers. MS-Noticias said three of its reporters have been physically attacked in recent months, one of them by a group of Zorilla supporters.Veracruz state prosecutor Pericles Namorado Urrutia maintains that Mejía is on the run because he is a suspect in the theft of a car. It turned out that a car he had been lent was a stolen one. But his wife Magdalena Maza Mendoza insists that it is inconceivable that he chose to disappear. A local journalist said if Mejía had gone into hiding, the police would have found him by now and, anyway, his family would not have reporting him missing on 13 July. MexicoAmericas Receive email alerts NSO Group hasn’t kept its promises on human rights, RSF and other NGOs say to go furtherlast_img read more

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Gov. Murphy Announces More Coronavirus Restrictions

first_imgGov. Phil Murphy details plans amid coronavirus. (Photo courtesy nj.gov)) Following are the latest coronavirus restrictions announced by New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy:New Jersey, New York and Connecticut will limit crowd capacity for recreational and social gatherings to 50 people — effective by 8 p.m. Monday night.Restaurants and bars will close for on-premise service and move to take-out and delivery only effective 8 p.m. tonight.Movie theaters, gyms and casinos will temporarily close effective 8 p.m. tonight.Uniform approach to social distancing will slow spread of COVID-19 throughout the tri-state area.Gov. Phil Murphy along with New York Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo and Connecticut Gov. Ned Lamont agreed to the regional approach to fight the novel coronavirus — or COVID-19 — throughout the tri-state area.These uniform standards will limit crowd capacity for social and recreational gatherings to 50 people, effective 8 p.m. Monday.This follows updated guidance that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued yesterday recommending the cancellation or postponement of in-person events consisting of 50 people or more.The three governors also announced restaurants and bars will close for on-premise service and move to take-out and delivery services only.These establishments will be provided a waiver for carry-out alcohol. These measures will take effect at 8 p.m. Monday.Finally, the three governors said they will temporarily close movie theaters, gyms and casinos, effective at 8 p.m. Monday.This uniform approach to social distancing is meant to slow the spread of the novel coronavirus, or COVID-19.Governor Murphy said in a press release, “With all we are seeing in our state — and across our nation and around the world — the time for us to take our strongest, and most direct, actions to date to slow the spread of coronavirus is now.”Murphy continued, “I’ve said many times over the past several days that, in our state, we are going to get through this as one New Jersey family. But if we’re all in this together, we must work with our neighboring states to act together. The work against coronavirus isn’t just up to some of us, it’s up to all of us.”last_img read more

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Harvard, HUCTW agree on new contract

first_imgHarvard University and the Harvard Union of Clerical and Technical Workers (HUCTW) are pleased to announce that they have reached a tentative agreement on a new three-year contract to provide employees in HUCTW with an annual pay increase program, changes in health plan design, and other policy initiatives.“We resolved challenging issues in a constructive way to the benefit of HUCTW members and the University,” said Katie Lapp, Harvard executive vice president. “Both parties came to these negotiations in good faith and we are pleased that our work produced an agreement acceptable to both sides. We value the work of HUCTW members, and we look forward to our continued collaboration on behalf of the Harvard community.”“Our union and the University have been wrestling with issues related to health care for quite a long time,” said HUCTW Director Bill Jaeger. “This agreement represents a very good outcome on those tough questions, and we’re hopeful it will usher in a new era of collaboration.”The agreement, which is subject to ratification by union members, would be effective retroactively from Oct. 1, 2015, and remain in effect through Sept. 30, 2018. The ratification vote is expected to take place Feb. 25.Key issues addressed in this contract include:Ensuring fair pay increases for employees in HUCTW, with raises scheduled for Oct. 1, 2015, 2016, and 2017;Implementing new health plan features that strike a balance between University and patient costs;Supporting HUCTW with a new health plan premium contribution tier for those earning less than $55,000 (FTE);Strengthening the workplace through policy initiatives in the areas of flexibility and career development.The prior HUCTW agreement with the University expired on Sept. 30, 2015, but its terms remained in effect throughout the negotiating period.Negotiations with the union began in the spring of 2015. Representatives of the University and the union met more than 40 times, in full-table negotiations and, starting last fall, with mediators engaged at the request of both sides.Mediators Lawrence Katz, the Elisabeth Allison Professor of Economics at Harvard, and Robert McKersie, professor of management emeritus at the MIT Sloan School of Management, played a crucial role in reaching this agreement, and the parties said they are very grateful to them for their hard work and their fair and thoughtful assistance.last_img read more

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Sunday in the Park’s Jake Gyllenhaal Gave Annaleigh Ashford Breast Pump Funnels

first_imgAnnaleigh Ashford What’s the best part about starring opposite Jake Gyllenhaal in Sunday in the Park with George on Broadway? Sharing a bathroom with Jake Gyllenhaal. OK, fine, that may not be the best part, but for Annaleigh Ashford, it sure is a perk. The Tony winner stopped by Late Night to chat with Seth Meyers about her dressing room situation with her leading man, the ever-so-thoughtful gift of breast pump funnels he got her, his impeccable singing voice and that time she peed on stage. Clearly, it wasn’t a career-ruining blunder. And for all you “Puppet Judy” fans out there, the star demonstrated her surreal Judy Garland tribute for Meyers. Check out the zany interview below, then catch Ashford, Gyllenhaal and company at the Hudson Theatre! Sunday in the Park With George View Commentscenter_img Show Closed This production ended its run on April 23, 2017 Related Showslast_img read more

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Jeremy Woolfe: The Brexit ‘Schock’ in Brussels

first_imgAnd now the question – what will happen in the medium and long term? What EU leaders don’t want, Incerti reports, is long, dragged-out negotiations. Article 50 of the 2009 Lisbon Treaty, they say, should be enacted straight away.Incerti, at the Centre for European Policy Studies (CEPS), also notes, wryly, that the referendum impact on the descending value of the pound had, already, during the first morning, resulted in the UK’s losing its status as the world’s fifth-largest economy. That honour now goes to France.Clearly prompted by rage, one reaction to the Leave vote comes from Elmar Brok, a member of the European Parliament. Significantly, he is also president of the Union of European Federalists. The German centre-rightist recommended that EU president Jean-Claude Junker immediately remove Lord Jonathan Hill as the British commissioner for financial services. Brok was by no means alone. In fact Hill, a devoted European, announced the next day that he would stand down. Valdis Dombrovskis, the Latvian commissioner, will take his place.But not so fast, cautions another commentator. I would not agree with Brok on Hill’s position, Zsolt Darvas tells IPE. Remember, whatever happens, the UK will remain a member of the EU for at least another two years. Perhaps, it could be “much longer”, suggests Darvas, a visiting fellow at another think tank, Bruegel.Interestingly, Darvas, a Hungarian, goes a stride further. He would not exclude the possibility of a second referendum in the UK. This could follow a fury-driven general election later this year. He might agree that forecasts of economic calamities, such as tragic job losses, coming true, could force such a move. Roughly on the same track, another bystander notes the young age-bracket of the Remain voters – young, virile and furious. Yet another observer, a mid-level official in the European Commission, wonders how the UK could ever square off the fact that 48% of the British voters, many with long lives ahead, did vote for Remain.Furthermore, Darvas offers that the Leave side, being strongly powered by opposition to immigration, could mean that the UK has to stick to its guns on this issue. This would rule out any Norway/Switzerland style outcome. Leaving what other options? And if London were to lose passporting rights, matters would be further “complicated”. A forecast of large funds having to leave the City could not be that far away.Back to the European Parliament, another MEP, with a less strident line than Brok’s, comes from Green Party member Sven Giegold. This MEP refers to Brexit as “a historic setback for the European Union but not its end”.However, Giegold goes on to note that, if the UK thinks it can have open access to the single market without taking on its common rules, it would be mistaken. There could be no free movement of capital for the City without free movement for citizens, he warns. Forces leading to a tumultuous political scene emerging in the UK do seem to be piling up. Will the pandemonium lead to another election soon? If Labour campaigned to stay in the EU by refusing to trigger Article 50, the effect would be the same as a second referendum. Out of the question? Perhaps not entirely. Jeremy Woolfe considers some of the many scenarios facing the UK and the EU post-BrexitThe fundamental reaction to the referendum result in Brussels appears to be one of shock. It was more or less completely unexpected. Discussion on the subject, at the previous day’s PensionsEurope annual gathering in Brussels, had been universally optimistic the Remain side would prevail.This view was supported by the 52%-48% Remain vs Leave polls, as well as by the performance of financial markets. A mood of optimism, nervous though it might be, prevailed. It lasted until up to around an hour after midnight British time.Then, at the no doubt one of many late-night Brussels gatherings, came the Newcastle result. Then, nail-biting and worry promptly set it. And finally, as told to IPE by think tank researcher Marco Incerti, the morning after dawned with a general feeling of sickening confusion.last_img read more