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Kinky Boots review

first_imgKinky BootsFor all the complaints about the semi-ghettoisation of British cinema, it often appears closer to its American mainstream counterparts, using the same emotional tricks and feel-good conventions. Julian Jarrold’s Kinky Boots is no exception, composed of generic set pieces and vaguely emotive pathos; a prime example of both the genre’s strengths and its failings.The premise of the film is vaguely quirky, about a failing shoe factory, transvestites, and a conflict between Northern sensibilities and metrosexual mores. Within this, there are the sketchy vestiges of social commentary, and the film even manages to inject a certain amount of tart humour. With a classical narrative ploy of the returning son, and a voyage of re-discovery both for hero and for community, the feel-good atmosphere that pervades the film is nothing we haven’t seen before. It’s practically made for Channel 4, in spirit if not in practice, and will most likely be more than moderately commercially and critically successful.Yet viewed objectively it looks calculated, a compilation of moribund motifs and touchstones from other movies. Its muted panoramas of a failing industrial Northern community is inferior to works such as 1996’s Brassed Off. Even The Full Monty, to which it must be inevitably compared, bettered its attempts at drawing analogies between masculine insecurity and declines in communities. Ironically, Kinky Boots’s greatest weakness is that when it comes to its central issue, its rather too successful for its own dramatic good. By showing us the complications of being true to oneself in a world which has abandoned its certainties in favour of style and transience, it only shows up the complete lack of core to the movie itself, disguised behind a thin layer of cliché.In its attempts to appear altogether liberal and sensitive in its sensibilities, Kinky Boots inevitably limits both its comic potential and the lucidity of its message. The film proclaims that the problem lies not with the individual, but with the interpretation of the social group, and then glorifies the mildly rebellious aims and effects of gender blurring. One character in especial, Lola/Simon, forms the focus for this discussion of gender, but Jarrold doesn’t have the conviction to address the reasons, save for a faintly charming Billy Elliot style flashback sequence. The film as it is cannot tackle these serious questions while still maintaining a primarily comedic tone; as a result, it fails to do either properly and is torn apart by its own paradoxes.The film also soft-peddles, surprisingly, on issues of sexuality. Lola/Simon might be torn, the film suggests discreetly, between a tensely flirtatious friendship with his boss Joel and a faintly flickering thing for his boss’s Northern Lass love interest, but it all ends in typical romance, with Lola left bullish but alone on stage, replete with heels and no hang-ups. Like another character, Chiwetel, when faced with real neurosis the film prefers to stave it off through glitzy set pieces and hollow music numbers.Kinky Boots proudly acknowledges its “based on a true story” origins. This doesn‘t, however, preclude its use of several horribly “quirky” stock-types, such as the eccentric but curiously unshock-able old  landlady. The acting is solid all-round, from both principals and supporting cast, and the cinematography is competent but uninspiring. In the end, though, there is nothing to set this film apart from the chain of look-alikes that have preceeded it in the British film industry.Our nation as it portrayed in its movies seems to be no more than a stockpile of stereotypes and platitudes. From the floppy-haired foppishness of Hugh Grant, to the feisty Northern strippers of The Full Monty, and now with more clichéd Brits to add to the list in Kinky Boots, we cannot seem to muster the courage to make a mainstream film that breaks free from these tired comic motifs. What we need in Britain is not a stiff upper lip, but a film industry with real imagination.ARCHIVE: 1st week MT 2005last_img read more

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Press release: HS2 Phase Two Managing Director update

first_img Phase Two has come a long way under Paul’s leadership. Phase 2a, the section from Birmingham to Crewe, is already in Parliament and is on course to receive Royal Assent next year. Phase 2b, the section from Birmingham to Leeds and from Crewe to Manchester, is well advanced in terms of its preparation for Parliament, particularly how it integrates with the existing network and the plans of Northern Powerhouse Rail. The working draft environmental statement for Phase 2b will be published later this autumn. We are grateful to Paul for the progress he has made with Phase Two and wish him and his family well in their new adventure. The press and media enquiries line is for accredited journalists only Contact form https://www.hs2.org.uk… Phase Two is critical to HS2’s goal of changing the economic geography of Britain, by bringing the towns and cities of the Midlands and the North closer together. Paul has played a vital part in moving that concept nearer to reality. Given its sheer scale and duration, changes of personnel and leadership are inevitable in a project such as HS2, particularly given the global demand for talented and experienced engineers such as Paul, but our focus remains on delivering a railway for the long term future of this country. And that we will do. Seeing HS2 move considerably closer to reality has been a privilege and will always have a special place in my career. HS2 is vital for the future of Britain and I will always be proud to have been part of its development. Paul will be leaving to take on the role of Program Director, leading the programme management team, on the $40 billion Metrolinx program in Toronto, the largest public transit investment in Canadian history. Paul, along with his family, will move to Canada at the end of the year. Paul joined HS2 Ltd in 2015 and has been responsible for working with central government and local stakeholders to plan and develop the route for Phase Two.HS2 Ltd’s CEO, Mark Thurston, said:center_img HS2 Ltd’s Chairman, Sir Terry Morgan, said: Paul will leave HS2 Ltd at the end of December and plans are now in train to find his successor. Paul Griffiths said: Press and media enquirieslast_img read more

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Three members of the Harvard M.B.A. Class of 2016 recognized for service to School and society

first_img Read Full Story Three members of the Harvard Business School M.B.A. Class of 2016 — Abdulaziz “Aziz” Albahar, Sara Gentile, and Needham Hurst — have been named recipients of the School’s prestigious Dean’s Award. They will be recognized by HBS Dean Nitin Nohria at Commencement ceremonies on the HBS campus on Thursday, May 26.Established in 1997, this annual award celebrates the extraordinary achievements of a graduating student or students who have made a positive impact on Harvard University, Harvard Business School, and/or broader communities. True to the M.B.A. program’s mission of educating leaders who make a difference in the world, each recipient has also contributed to the well-being of society through exceptional acts of leadership. Nominations come from the entire HBS community. A selection committee comprising faculty, administrators, and students then makes recommendations to the dean, who makes the final decision.last_img read more

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Bucksport Routs GSA

first_img State budget vs. job creation – January 22, 2015 House fire in Winter Harbor – October 27, 2014 Hancock County Court News Nov. 3 thorugh Dec. 11 – January 22, 2015 Bio Latest Posts BUCKSPORT — The Bucksport Golden Bucks opened their season on a winning note Friday, crushing the GSA Eagles 16-3 at Bucksport. For more sports stories, pick up a copy of The Ellsworth American. Latest posts by admin (see all) admin This is placeholder textThis is placeholder textlast_img