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Cyber-dissident Zhang Jianhong (“Li Hong”) gets six years in prison

first_img Follow the news on China ChinaAsia – Pacific ChinaAsia – Pacific RSF_en Reporters Without Borders voiced dismay on learning that cyber-dissident Zhang Jianhong, who is also known by the pen-name of Li Hong, was sentenced today to six years in prison by a court in Ningbo, in the eastern province of Zhejiang. He has appealed against the sentence. Zhang was arrested in September 2006 and was charged the following month with “incitement to subvert the state’s authority” for calling for political reform in articles posted on the Internet. Two other cyber-dissidents who were arrested six months ago, Chen Shuqing and Yang Maodong, are still awaiting trial. News April 27, 2021 Find out more China’s Cyber ​​Censorship Figures Help by sharing this information Democracies need “reciprocity mechanism” to combat propaganda by authoritarian regimes News Receive email alertscenter_img March 12, 2021 Find out more Reporters Without Borders voiced dismay on learning that cyber-dissident Zhang Jianhong, who is also known by the pen-name of Li Hong, was sentenced today to six years in prison by a court in Ningbo, in the eastern province of Zhejiang. He has appealed against the sentence.A member of the Chinese branch of the independent writers association PEN, Zhang was arrested in September 2006 and was charged the following month with “incitement to subvert the state’s authority” for calling for political reform in articles posted on the Internet. Two other cyber-dissidents who were arrested six months ago, Chen Shuqing and Yang Maodong, are still awaiting trial.“This verdict is sadly yet another example of the judicial system being used by the political authorities,” Reporters Without Borders said. “It is outrageous that cyber-dissidents get severe prison sentences just for the views they express. Yet again, they are being made to pay a heavy price for their commitment. After Zhang’s conviction, we fear that the same fate is in store for Chen and Yang.”According to the New China news agency, Zhang was convicted of writing “articles defaming the Chinese government and calling for agitation to overthrow the government.” The court said it was showing clemency to the defendant, who posted around 100 articles on the Internet from May to September 2006, because he expressed remorse during the trial.Aged 48, Zhang founded the literary website Aiqinghai.net in August 2005 and was its editor until the authorities shut it down in March 2006. He also wrote regularly for sites such as Boxun and The Epoch Times. He already spent a year and a half in a reeducation-through-work camp for “counter-revolutionary propaganda” after getting involved in the 1989 pro-democracy movement. Chen’s case has been sent back to the police for further investigation. A member of the banned China Democracy Party (CDP), he was charged on 17 October 2006 with “incitement to subvert the state’s authority.” He was already detained for four months in 1999 for helping to create the CDP. Better known as Guo Feixiong, Yang was arrested on 14 September 2006. A lawyer, writer and human rights activist, he has been accused of “illegal business activity.” He was previously arrested for “disturbing the peace” after a rally on 13 September 2005 in the village of Taishi (in Guangdong province). ———————-Read our weekly “blog review” and create your blog with Reporters without borders: www.rsfblog.org News March 19, 2007 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Cyber-dissident Zhang Jianhong (“Li Hong”) gets six years in prison Organisation to go further News China: Political commentator sentenced to eight months in prison June 2, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

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Gabon : Information restricted in Gabon after coup attempt

first_img January 8, 2019 Gabon : Information restricted in Gabon after coup attempt December 31, 2019 Find out more Help by sharing this information Soliders standing in front of the RTG offices in Libreville this 7th January 2019. Crédit: Steve JORDAN / AFP News GabonAfrica Condemning abuses InternetFreedom of expression Reporters Without Borders (RSF) calls on the Gabonese authorities not to restrict the flow of news and information and to guarantee the ability to journalists to work amid the turmoil following a coup attempt early yesterday morning, in which soldiers stormed into the national radio and TV station, RTG, and broadcast a call for an uprising. The authorities quickly announced the arrest of the mutineers’ leader and said the situation was “under control.” But the Internet, which was disconnected early yesterday, had not been restored by the end of the day. RTG eventually resumed its regular programming yesterday evening.According to the president’s office, the five journalists and technicians who were at RTG headquarters when the soldiers arrived were not allowed to leave and were forced to broadcast the communiqué read by their leader, Lt. Obiang Kelly, who identified himself as the Republican Guard’s deputy commander. News “We condemn the use of force against journalists and the restrictions on news and information,” said Arnaud Froger, the head of RSF’s Africa desk. “The restoration of order announced by the authorities must be accompanied by an effective restoration of the Internet in Gabon. In the current fluid situation, Gabonese need more than ever to have access to credible media coverage, and journalists must be able to do their job to report the news.” Follow the news on Gabon Gabon is ranked 108th out of 180 countries in RSF’s 2018 World Press Freedom Index. Organisation Reports Receive email alerts RSF_en to go further Weekly seized from Gabon’s newsstands November 27, 2020 Find out more The 2020 pandemic has challenged press freedom in Africa The communiqué called for a popular uprising in response to the “pathetic spectacle” offered by the country’s president, Ali Bongo, who broadcast a New Year message from Morocco in a bid to reassure the Gabonese public about his state of health and ability to run the country. Bongo has not returned to Gabon since suffering a stroke in Saudi Arabia in October and is now convalescing in Morocco. News GabonAfrica Condemning abuses InternetFreedom of expression Gabonese journalist could spend New Year’s Eve in prison January 24, 2020 Find out morelast_img read more

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Butterfly Food.

first_imgButterfly Photo Gallery Black Swallowtail Queen Anne’s Lace, Rue Phlox, Lantana, Tithonia Butterfly Forage Attractor Pipevine Swallowtail Dutchmans pipe (Aristolochia) Lantana, Phlox, Buddleia Great Purple Hairstreak Mistletoe (Fruit) Asclepias Tiger Swallowtail Tulip Tree, Cherry, Birch Phlox, Lantana, Tithonia Monarch Milkweed Asclepias, Buddleia, Zinnia Painted Lady Hollyhock Aster, Cosmos, Echinacea Silver Spotted Skipper Robinia (Locust) legumes Lantana, Milkweed, Zinnia Cabbage Butterfly (White) Crucifers, Nasturtiums Verbena, Tithonia Gulf Frittilary Passiflora Lantana, Buddleia (American) Painted Lady Anaphalis Echinacea, Buddleia Spring (blue) Azure Dogwood, Viburnum Clover, Tradescantia Fiery Skipper Crabgrass Lantana, Echinacea Cloudless Sulfur Cassia, Clover, Apple Salvia, Verbena, Buddleia Crescentspot (Pearl) Aster Rudbeckia, Echinacea Morning Cloak Willow, Elm, Hackberry (Fruit) Zinnias Spicebush Swallowtail Sassafras, Persea, Lindera Phlox, Lantana, Tithonia Harvester Witchhazel (larvae eat aphids) Echinacea Questionmark Elm, Nettles, Hackberry (Fruit) (Sap) Orange Sulfur White Clover, Alfalfa Clover, Verbena Comma Elm, Nettles, Hops (Fruit) (Sap) Zebra Swallowtail Paw Paw Blueberry, Buddleia Dogface Butterfly Clovers Eupatorium, Clover, Verbena Viceroy Willow, Apple, Plums Echinacea, Zinnias Giant Swallowtail Citrus (Orange) Buddleia, Tithonia, Orange More on Butterfly Garden Plan a Butterfly Garden Best Butterfly Plants Red Spotted Purple Willow, Cherry Apple, Buddleia Common Sulfur Clover, Alfalfa, Vetch Clover, Bergena Ohio Buckeye Snapdragon, Plantain Coreopsis, Echinacea, Aster Place for Water, Rest Attracting Hummingbirds Gray Hairstreak (Common) Hibiscus, Beans, Clover, Oak Hibiscus, Asclepiaslast_img read more

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Fend off card fraud

first_img continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Fighting credit and debit card fraud is a shifting battle as would-be thieves regularly roll out novel schemes, but credit unions can look to new defenses from card issuers and processors built on sophisticated data analytics.For merchants who completed the EMV chip upgrade, card fraud at the point of purchase has declined 76% since 2015, which marked the liability shift to merchants not equipped to process chip card payments, says Doug Leighton, head of community accounts for CUES Supplier member Visa, based in San Francisco. Now credit unions must remain vigilant and look for fraud prevention and detection tools in the card-not-present environment, where the threat of fraud persists in e-commerce, online billing and mail order.“Generally, across our business, growth is happening in card-not-present transactions at roughly four times that of face-to-face growth rates,” he says. “Credit unions need to be talking to their network partners and processors to make sure that they are enabling the latest technologies to combat that fraud”—and, in the bargain, head off additional operational costs and member inconvenience.last_img read more

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Gayle A. Schaefer

first_imgMemorial contributions can be directed to St. Jacob’s Cemetery, the Sunman Life Squad or to the Sunman Volunteer Fire Department.  To sign the online guestbook please visit www.cookrosenberger.com.  The staff of Cook Rosenberger is honored to serve the family of Gayle Schaefer. Those surviving who will cherish Gayle’s memory include her children, Kristy (John) Miller of Brookville, Lisa (Ken) Mosmeier of Sunman, Kim (David) Craig of Lawrenceburg, Shari (Jeff) Sterwerf of Sunman, and Kelley (Randy) Fuernstein of Brookville; grandchildren, Jonathan Mosmeier, Joshua Craig, Brittany Craig, Aaron Sterwerf, Kaitlin Sterwerf, and Colton Fuernstein; siblings, Eileen Gunter of Batesville, Lester (Audrey) Hornberger of Sunman, Virginia Richter of Sunman, Paul Jr. (Debbie) Hornberger of Brookville, Wanda (Harold) Vogt of Batesville, and one sister-in-law, Patsy Hornberger of Sunman.  Besides her parents, she was preceded in death by her husband, Ralph F. Schaefer; a brother and sister-in-law, Jim and Evelyn Hornberger; brother, Dale Hornberger; and two brothers-in-law, Dale Gunter and David Richter. Gayle A. Schaefer, of Sunman, was born on August 22, 1935 in Sunman, a daughter to Paul E. Sr., and Frieda E. Schantz Hornberger.  She married Ralph F. Schaefer on September 17, 1956 at St. Paul Catholic Church in New Alsace and together they raised five daughters.  Gayle worked at Western-Southern Life in the office until Ralph and she started their family. She later went back to work at Weber’s Greenhouse and McPhersons.  She attended St. Jacob’s UCC-Blue Creek, and was widely known for her beautiful flowers and prosperous garden.  Gayle’s favorite hobby however was shopping, especially for shoes!  She loved spending time with her family, and going to craft shows.  Christmas was her favorite holiday and she always had the perfect tree.  On Tuesday, July 10, 2018 at the age of 82, Gayle passed away at Christ Hospital in Cincinnati.center_img Friends may visit with the family on Friday, July 13, 2018 from 4 until 8 p.m. at Cook Rosenberger Funeral Home, 107 Vine Street, Sunman.  Pastor Lynne Busch will officiate the funeral service on Saturday at St. Jacobs UCC-Blue Creek at 10 a.m. and burial will follow in the church cemetery.last_img read more

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How injuries shaped Gabriela Knutson’s backhand, her ‘best shot’

first_img Comments Published on April 22, 2019 at 8:44 pm Contact Andrew: [email protected] | @CraneAndrew Gabriela Knutson shook her right hand repeatedly and sat down. At the end of her last two rallies in a March 31 singles match, two forehand shots had sailed into the net. During the changeover, Knutson went to her bench and mouthed “Ow.” She had cocked her racket back and stepped forward to meet the balls in front of her, but never finished her arm’s rotation. Knutson’s right arm ached after the repeated stresses of one-handed forehands, and she needed her backhand to save the match. “My backhand was always my shot, always will be,” Knutson said. “That’s the thing I go to.”Despite Knutson’s loss, her backhand shot helped mitigate her right arm pain. As a child, Knutson immediately favored the backhand and it soon became her “best shot,” she said. When injuries arose from a new forehand technique Knutson learned as a teenager, her backhand became a specialty. As Knutson’s final season with No. 30 Syracuse (13-12, 5-9 Atlantic Coast) winds down, Knutson has used the shot to not only rejuvenate a tennis career that almost ended before college, but also become the top tennis player for SU. “It’s not like someday I’m going to wake up and my forehand is going to be better than my backhand,” Knutson said. “No matter how much I practice, that’s never going to happen.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textThe first time Knutson felt initial pain in her right arm was two days after she returned to the Czech Republic. She was 16 and for the previous month, Knutson worked on her forehand in Miami with one of her mother’s friends, her mother, Ilona Knutson, said. As her tennis career progressed, Ilona changed Knutson’s forehand grip and motion. While in Miami, Knutson used more wrist motion and exaggerated the finishing turn.Her first day home, Knutson was ecstatic. “My forehand is much better,” she told her mother. Ilona agreed. But that next day, Knutson complained about right wrist pain. On the third day, it throbbed again and got even worse as the days went by. Knutson “couldn’t even lift a cup of tea,” Ilona said.Knutson’s muscles hadn’t developed enough for her new form. She quit for a brief time to let her arm heal and became out of shape, Ilona said. It wasn’t the first time — or the last — that an arm injury hindered Knutson. When she was eight, she had her first. Last semester was her third.“If you see a tennis player’s back, it’s always a little lopsided,” Knutson said, slanting her right shoulder up. “(Tennis players) are very prone to right-hand injuries, especially me. I don’t know why.”Susie Teuscher | Digital Design EditorWhen she resumed play, Knutson relied almost exclusively on her backhand for six months. Occasionally, she mixed in a left-handed forehand shot, but it felt unnatural. If Knutson wanted a chance at college and professional tennis, her forehand form was key, and she would have to use the motion more.That pain didn’t return during her first three years at SU, at least not to a comparable level, Knutson said. Her forehand shot improved and she began to mix it in more, but Knutson always set up her backhand when possible. That combination helped her rise to No. 4 in the nation as a junior. Now, Knutson takes an extra step to drop back and execute fading backhand defensive lobs, net-grazing crosscourt winners and short-hopping service returns that help earn points. “She does take the ball very early, and she’s strong too,” Limam said, “so she generates a lot of pace and power of her backhand shot.”One week after Knutson resorted to her backhand against NC State, she followed Miami’s Estela Perez-Somarriba’s shot into the left corner. Knutson fired a crosscourt backhand while facing match point. The deep ball was returned high in the air by Perez-Somarriba, and this time, Knutson waited patiently at the net and volleyed a winner. The SU senior turned and strolled back to the service line, and grimaced as she awaited her next shot. The pain in her forearm forced her to repeatedly shake her hand, but her favorite shot again kept her in it.“If she gets to a backhand rally,” Ilona said, “I know it’s going to be good.”center_img Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more