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What’s in Store for Existing Home Sales . . .

first_img in Daily Dose, Featured, Headlines, Journal, Market Studies, News  Print This Post Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Related Articles Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Sign up for DS News Daily The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Tagged with: Existing Home Sales HOUSING Lawrence Yun mortgage NAR Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Nicole Casperson is the Associate Editor of DS News and MReport. She graduated from Texas Tech University where she received her M.A. in Mass Communications and her B.A. in Journalism. Casperson previously worked as a graduate teaching instructor at Texas Tech’s College of Media and Communications. Her thesis will be published by the International Communication Association this fall. To contact Casperson, e-mail: [email protected] The National Association of Realtors (NAR) recently released its Existing Home Sales report—discovering that October 2017 reported the strongest pace since June, but low supply continues to lead to fewer closings on an annual basis for the second month in a row.Amidst the ongoing narrative of supply shortages, the report found that total existing-home sales increased by 2.0 percent to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 5.48 million in October from 5.37 million in September.According to NAR’s Chief Economist Lawrence Yun, this slight increase is attributed to job growth, which in most of the country continues to carry on at a robust level and is starting to slowly push up wages—giving households added assurance that now is a good time to buy a home.”While the housing market gained a little more momentum last month, sales are still below year-ago levels because low inventory is limiting choices for prospective buyers and keeping price growth elevated,” Yun said.Although the impact on housing from Hurricanes Harvey and Irma are still experienced in parts of Texas and Florida, Yun forecasts that sales should rebound.”The residual effects on sales from Hurricanes Harvey and Irma are still seen in parts of Texas and Florida,” Yun added. “However, sales should completely bounce back to their pre-storm levels by the end of the year, as demand for buying in these areas was very strong before the storms.”The report notes that the median existing-home price for all housing types in October was $247,000—representing a 5.5 percent increase from last year at $234,100. In addition, this price increase for October marks the 68th straight month of year-over-year gains, according to NAR.At the end of October, totally housing inventory decreased 3.2 percent to 1.80 million existing homes for sale, and is now “10.4 percent lower than a year ago at 2.01 million, and has fallen year-over-year for 29 consecutive months.”Meanwhile, the report notes that unsold inventory is at a 3.9-month supply at the current sales pace—a decline from 4.4 months a year ago.”Listings—especially those in the affordable price range—continue to go under contract typically a week faster than a year ago, and even quicker in many areas where healthy job markets are driving sustained demand for buying,” said Yun. “With the seasonal decline in inventory beginning to occur in most markets, prospective buyers will likely continue to see competitive conditions through the winter.”To view the full report, click here. Previous: Ocwen Announces Millions in New Mortgage Debt Forgiveness in Ohio Next: Home Prices Outpace Salariescenter_img Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago About Author: Nicole Casperson Share Save Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Subscribe The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Existing Home Sales HOUSING Lawrence Yun mortgage NAR 2017-11-21 Nicole Casperson What’s in Store for Existing Home Sales . . . November 21, 2017 1,556 Views Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Home / Daily Dose / What’s in Store for Existing Home Sales . . .last_img read more

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‘Heartbleed,’ ‘Shellshock,’ and ‘Poodle’—Oh my!

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Credit unions can expect continued exposure to cyber attacks.by: Jay McLaughlinLast year will be remembered as the year that left its mark on the state of computer security across the industry.From massive retail data breaches to cyber attacks waged by nation states against organizations, the widespread impacts led to unprecedented repercussions such as brand damage, increased audit scrutiny, and loss of market share.We witnessed a barrage of new malware variants and revamped sophisticated banking Trojans with even more capabilities.And how could we possibly forget the creative names bestowed upon the high-profile vulnerabilities disclosed: “Heartbleed,” “Shellshock,” and “Poodle” (you could cleverly add “oh my”).So what does 2015 have in store? Not surprisingly, we should probably hedge our bets toward more of the same.Protecting your membersThink credit unions and other community financial institutions aren’t in the cross-hairs? Think again.Account takeover fraud continued to rise in 2014, topping the $6 billion mark.Skilled fraudsters will continue to focus their attention on high-value targets—and no financial institution should think it’s excluded. continue reading »last_img read more

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Coca-Cola Presents 7 Lucky Youngsters the Opportunity of a Life-Time at…

first_imgIt will be an unbelievable experience like no other for the youngsters, one they have never experienced before, the ultimate fan experience with his home nation, feeling like a part of the team, an incredibly proud & honorable moment for them at the FIFA World Cup! The most watched sporting tournament in the World.Coca-Cola continues to encourage fans to get behind the team as they #ShareACokeWithOurSuperEagles. The company has further shown its support in presenting the 7 lucky youngsters with this unique opportunity to be a genuine part of Nigeria’s 2018 FIFA World Cup story, come rain, or shine.Throughout this football season, Coca-Cola plans on keeping with its promise to bring happiness to its consumers with every sip. Coca-Cola is thrilled to join millions of fans around the world in their support for Nigeria’s Super Eagles, as the simple pleasure of drinking a Coca-Cola can make an ordinary moment feel extra special.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegram Coca-Cola Nigeria, the official soft drink sponsor for the Super Eagles at the 2018 FIFA World Cup in Russia, has given 7 lucky young youngsters the opportunity of a lifetime at this year’s FIFA World Cup.Not only will the youngsters have the opportunity to watch their home nation live in Russia, six (6) of them will be tasked with carrying the Nigerian National Flag onto the pitch prior to the game, and 1 very lucky youngster amongst them will conduct the coin toss to determine who kicks off the match.last_img read more

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How injuries shaped Gabriela Knutson’s backhand, her ‘best shot’

first_img Comments Published on April 22, 2019 at 8:44 pm Contact Andrew: [email protected] | @CraneAndrew Gabriela Knutson shook her right hand repeatedly and sat down. At the end of her last two rallies in a March 31 singles match, two forehand shots had sailed into the net. During the changeover, Knutson went to her bench and mouthed “Ow.” She had cocked her racket back and stepped forward to meet the balls in front of her, but never finished her arm’s rotation. Knutson’s right arm ached after the repeated stresses of one-handed forehands, and she needed her backhand to save the match. “My backhand was always my shot, always will be,” Knutson said. “That’s the thing I go to.”Despite Knutson’s loss, her backhand shot helped mitigate her right arm pain. As a child, Knutson immediately favored the backhand and it soon became her “best shot,” she said. When injuries arose from a new forehand technique Knutson learned as a teenager, her backhand became a specialty. As Knutson’s final season with No. 30 Syracuse (13-12, 5-9 Atlantic Coast) winds down, Knutson has used the shot to not only rejuvenate a tennis career that almost ended before college, but also become the top tennis player for SU. “It’s not like someday I’m going to wake up and my forehand is going to be better than my backhand,” Knutson said. “No matter how much I practice, that’s never going to happen.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textThe first time Knutson felt initial pain in her right arm was two days after she returned to the Czech Republic. She was 16 and for the previous month, Knutson worked on her forehand in Miami with one of her mother’s friends, her mother, Ilona Knutson, said. As her tennis career progressed, Ilona changed Knutson’s forehand grip and motion. While in Miami, Knutson used more wrist motion and exaggerated the finishing turn.Her first day home, Knutson was ecstatic. “My forehand is much better,” she told her mother. Ilona agreed. But that next day, Knutson complained about right wrist pain. On the third day, it throbbed again and got even worse as the days went by. Knutson “couldn’t even lift a cup of tea,” Ilona said.Knutson’s muscles hadn’t developed enough for her new form. She quit for a brief time to let her arm heal and became out of shape, Ilona said. It wasn’t the first time — or the last — that an arm injury hindered Knutson. When she was eight, she had her first. Last semester was her third.“If you see a tennis player’s back, it’s always a little lopsided,” Knutson said, slanting her right shoulder up. “(Tennis players) are very prone to right-hand injuries, especially me. I don’t know why.”Susie Teuscher | Digital Design EditorWhen she resumed play, Knutson relied almost exclusively on her backhand for six months. Occasionally, she mixed in a left-handed forehand shot, but it felt unnatural. If Knutson wanted a chance at college and professional tennis, her forehand form was key, and she would have to use the motion more.That pain didn’t return during her first three years at SU, at least not to a comparable level, Knutson said. Her forehand shot improved and she began to mix it in more, but Knutson always set up her backhand when possible. That combination helped her rise to No. 4 in the nation as a junior. Now, Knutson takes an extra step to drop back and execute fading backhand defensive lobs, net-grazing crosscourt winners and short-hopping service returns that help earn points. “She does take the ball very early, and she’s strong too,” Limam said, “so she generates a lot of pace and power of her backhand shot.”One week after Knutson resorted to her backhand against NC State, she followed Miami’s Estela Perez-Somarriba’s shot into the left corner. Knutson fired a crosscourt backhand while facing match point. The deep ball was returned high in the air by Perez-Somarriba, and this time, Knutson waited patiently at the net and volleyed a winner. The SU senior turned and strolled back to the service line, and grimaced as she awaited her next shot. The pain in her forearm forced her to repeatedly shake her hand, but her favorite shot again kept her in it.“If she gets to a backhand rally,” Ilona said, “I know it’s going to be good.”center_img Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more