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Covering corruption exposes journalists to arrest in Iraq

first_img Three jailed reporters charged with “undermining national security” News The latest victim was Mostafa Hamed, a reporter based in Fallujah, in the western province of Al Anbar, where he works for the local TV channel Sharqeya. He was arrested at his home at 2 a.m. on 9 June by policemen who did not tell him what he was charged with, and was finally released today without being charged. According to the information gathered by the Journalistic Freedoms Observatory (JFO), RSF’s partner NGO in Iraq, Hamed had been investigating the involvement of Fallujah city hall leaders in a real estate scandal. Sharqeya is owned by Saad al Bazzaz, a local businessman and political rival of Al Anbar’s governor, who tried to get the TV channel closed last December. The other recent victim is Hossam al Kaabi, a reporter based in Najaf, 180 km south of Baghdad, who has repeatedly been harassed in connection with his coverage of an alleged corruption case involving the Najaf provincial airport’s former governing board. What with money, women and threats, every kind of method has been used in an attempt to silence his reporting on the case, he said. The corruption case is however by no means a secret. He has also been the target of dozens of legal actions. The latest method was an arrest warrant, which resulted in his having to pay the large sum of 15 million dinars (10,745 euros) in bail to obtain his release on 6 June. The warrant was the result of a complaint filed by Najaf airport’s former administration four days after Kaabi’s main media outlet, the NRT network’s Arabic-language channel, was forced to close for financial reasons. Defended by a consortium of lawyers, Kaabi told RSF he is concerned about the outcome because of the lack of judicial independence in Iraq. “These two arrest warrants highlight the different kinds of difficulties for journalists in Iraq, which not only include being unjustly prosecuted but also the risk of seeing your work used for the purposes of the political rivalry,” said Sophie Anmuth, the head of RSF’s Middle East desk. “The absurd proceedings against Hossam al Kaabi must be dropped and the authorities must do their duty to protect journalists who are the target of threats.” As Kaabi points out on Facebook, in theory Iraqi law protects the right of journalists to seek information and sources. But in practice, as JFO has often reported, local officials act with impunity when they use judicial pressure and sometimes death threats to pressure journalists who investigate corruption. Iraq is ranked 160th out of 180 countries in RSF’s 2018 World Press Freedom Index. RSF’s 2020 Round-up: 50 journalists killed, two-thirds in countries “at peace” December 28, 2020 Find out more IraqMiddle East – North Africa Condemning abusesProtecting sources Judicial harassment June 12, 2018 Covering corruption exposes journalists to arrest in Iraq News Follow the news on Iraq Help by sharing this information News Reporters Without Borders (RSF) condemns the arrests to which two investigative reporters have been subjected in different parts of Iraq in the past few days in connection with their coverage of corruption, and calls for an end to the harassment of these journalists.center_img to go further February 15, 2021 Find out more Receive email alerts Hossam al Kaabi IraqMiddle East – North Africa Condemning abusesProtecting sources Judicial harassment Iraq : Wave of arrests of journalists covering protests in Iraqi Kurdistan RSF_en News Organisation December 16, 2020 Find out morelast_img read more

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Harvard, HUCTW agree on new contract

first_imgHarvard University and the Harvard Union of Clerical and Technical Workers (HUCTW) are pleased to announce that they have reached a tentative agreement on a new three-year contract to provide employees in HUCTW with an annual pay increase program, changes in health plan design, and other policy initiatives.“We resolved challenging issues in a constructive way to the benefit of HUCTW members and the University,” said Katie Lapp, Harvard executive vice president. “Both parties came to these negotiations in good faith and we are pleased that our work produced an agreement acceptable to both sides. We value the work of HUCTW members, and we look forward to our continued collaboration on behalf of the Harvard community.”“Our union and the University have been wrestling with issues related to health care for quite a long time,” said HUCTW Director Bill Jaeger. “This agreement represents a very good outcome on those tough questions, and we’re hopeful it will usher in a new era of collaboration.”The agreement, which is subject to ratification by union members, would be effective retroactively from Oct. 1, 2015, and remain in effect through Sept. 30, 2018. The ratification vote is expected to take place Feb. 25.Key issues addressed in this contract include:Ensuring fair pay increases for employees in HUCTW, with raises scheduled for Oct. 1, 2015, 2016, and 2017;Implementing new health plan features that strike a balance between University and patient costs;Supporting HUCTW with a new health plan premium contribution tier for those earning less than $55,000 (FTE);Strengthening the workplace through policy initiatives in the areas of flexibility and career development.The prior HUCTW agreement with the University expired on Sept. 30, 2015, but its terms remained in effect throughout the negotiating period.Negotiations with the union began in the spring of 2015. Representatives of the University and the union met more than 40 times, in full-table negotiations and, starting last fall, with mediators engaged at the request of both sides.Mediators Lawrence Katz, the Elisabeth Allison Professor of Economics at Harvard, and Robert McKersie, professor of management emeritus at the MIT Sloan School of Management, played a crucial role in reaching this agreement, and the parties said they are very grateful to them for their hard work and their fair and thoughtful assistance.last_img read more

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Bill would enhance federal regulators’ cybersecurity programs

first_img continue reading » Protecting Americans’ financial and other personal information no matter what entity possesses it is of utmost importance to credit unions, CUNA wrote to House Financial Services Committee leadership Tuesday. The committee conducted a markup of several bill starting Tuesday, including the CUNA-supported Cybersecurity and Financial System Resilience Act (H.R. 4458).“America’s credit unions support efforts to ensure that the entire financial services sector has proper cyber safeguards in place and this effort should extend to the sectors’ regulators,” the letter reads. “H.R. 4458 would require the sectors’ regulators to each issue an annual report to Congress describing measures the respective agency has taken to strengthen cybersecurity with respect to its functions as a regulator, including the supervision and regulation of financial institutions and, where applicable, third-party service providers.”The Federal Information Security Modernization Act (FISMA) requires regulators to develop, document and implement an agency-wide program to provide information security for systems that support the operations and assets of the agency. ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more