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Brazilian Army Riverine Assault Patrol Boat to the Test

first_img This is an impressive boat. The Center for Vessels of the Amazon Military Command (CMA) is performing operational tests of the Riverine Patrol Boat (RPB). The U.S.-manufactured vessel will be under evaluation for a six month period. The RPB armor is capable of withstanding gunfire from 7.62 mm ammunition and the capacity to transport up to 15 combatants. In addition, it is capable of performing attacks and defense with weaponry placed on the starboard side and port side, and can deploy a ramp from the bow for land assaults, which is a very useful feature in river operations, a typical setting for infantry deployment in the Amazon. The tests aim to promote an adequate analysis of the boat and its use in “Project Vessels,” carried out by the Army’s Department of Engineering and Construction. By Dialogo November 05, 2012last_img read more

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The Queensland homes that are getting our attention this week

first_imgThe stunning interior of 36 Southern Cross Drive.The third most viewed home for the week is a Georgian-inspired stunner in the acreage Brisbane suburb of Chandler. Outside 102 Cobb Road.The home is designed to embrace the space that the 3012 sqm block offers with features including ensuites in two of the bedrooms, four living areas and six metre wide stacker doors. More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus19 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market19 hours agoA bit of old world charm inside 102 Cobb Road.It is listed through Century 21 North Lakes as an express sale.Over on the Gold Coast a waterfront mansion on the exclusive Coronis Island was the second most viewed of the week.On a street filled with stunning mansions, 36 Southern Cross Drive still manages to stand out with its triple garage, internal elevator, granite benchtops, spotted gum timber floors and limestone and travertine tiles. If you think this looks fancy, just wait till you see inside.With 901 sqm of floor space, 652 London Road has a number of high-end additions including Spanish Crema Merfil marble flooring, French doors, cold room and a wine cellar. 36 Southern Cross Drive Surfers Paradise could be the perfect party pad.It will cost you though, with the listing through NGU Real Estate calling for offers between $4.8 and $5 million. center_img ELEGANT STYLE: A euro-styled mansion got a lot of attention online.AN EXPANSIVE Hamptons style home outside of Brisbane was the most viewed Queensland property on realestate.com.au for the week.The five-bedroom home at 102 Cobb Road in Burpengary, between Brisbane and the Sunshine Coast, has a spacious 518 sqm floor plan as well as an elegant design. Told you.The elegance continues outside with a water fountain, manicured gardens and a 20 metre lap pool.It is listed now through Place Bulimba.last_img read more

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OED reflects on issues of discrimination, harassment

first_imgThe Office of Equity and Diversity is twice as large since the Los Angeles Times first reported on sexual assault incidents that occurred during former USC gynecologist George Tyndall’s career. (Joelle Tenderich/Daily Trojan) Since the Los Angeles Times published its investigation on former campus gynecologist George Tyndall’s allegedly misconduct-riddled career, Jividen said that the office has doubled in size. Currently, there are eight investigators and typically about 40 to 50 cases open at a time, covering a wide range of issues such as sexual harassment and discrimination. During the event, discussion surrounding Tyndall’s alleged misconduct dominated most of the conversation. Many female faculty and staff members present spoke out about systemic sexism instilled in American culture. Jividen continued to emphasize the importance of addressing any kinds of issues on campus. “I’m looking forward to building and contributing to the [diversity and inclusion] work here at the University and building it enough to not have to be its own week or a special thing,” Crenshaw said. “I can see the long-term vision of the [Diversity and Inclusion] week is bringing that work [to say], ‘We’ve done all of this, and how can we push it further? How can we continue to grow and expand and make it open and honest for everybody?’ Because diversity and inclusion is a whole umbrella.” “Who is going to have the guts to report that kind of behavior, knowing that their job is on the line or their colleague’s job is on the line or something like that?” Jividen said. “We have to feel like the institution is going to be responsive to your concerns.” OED Director John Jividen led the discussion and represented the office during the event. The OED is responsible for investigating cases of protected-class discrimination and harassment in the USC community. Various women at the event emphasized the need for proper new-hire training at USC, citing that power dynamics in many professional relationships among faculty members and with students can ultimately pose a problem. “[The goal] is to start a conversation about equity and inclusion on campus and just get people talking about these issues more, meeting people that are like-minded and want to learn more about this and engage in this important conversation,” Jividen said. The USC Office of Equity and Diversity hosted a public meeting Tuesday to address ongoing patterns of discrimination and harassment cases on campus. The event, titled “What We Have Learned: The Ramifications of Not Having Difficult Conversations,” was part of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Week and stressed the importance of having open conversations about the current challenges facing the University. “Don’t talk about it, be about it,” said Erika Crenshaw, a project specialist in the Information Technology Services department who attended the event. “[The OED should] show me that things have changed. Actions speak louder than words.” “We’re missing one big component and that’s the difficulty to have these conversations,” he said. “People feel [the] administration isn’t responsive and hasn’t been responsive to bad misconduct and behavior in the past,” Jividen said. “The hope is that with the proper resources and the proper attention, we will move forward onto a better path after the things that have gone wrong in the past years.” Attendees discussed how the OED has an obligation to address incidents of discrimination and misconduct sooner and more carefully. Jividen said an incident of someone saying the N-word took six months to investigate. Jividen discussed instances of inappropriate behavior, racism and sexism that have been ignored for decades at the University. During his presentation, Jividen discussed four examples of misconduct that have occurred on campus. These include a senior administrator hearing sexual comments from a subordinate, a manager hearing someone use a racial slur, colleagues describing a faculty member as “tyrannical and offensive” and a faculty member friending a student on social media and chatting with her.last_img read more