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Traders vent anger at city’s decline

first_imgFacebook Print AMID threats to withdraw payment of rates and make city council bankrupt, traders did not mince their words of condemnation when they demanded immediate action from City Hall in order to save what remains of Limerick’s city centre’s retail business.They pointed to, and requested:Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up * Poor garda presence on the streets* expensive parking* dirty streets* magnificent wide paths but no footfall* beggars and heroin addicts causing intimidation* incentive for shoppers to “come into town”* first hour of on-street parking free* paint the frontages of the premises in the Opera Centre or demolish it entirely* more ground floor parkingSpeaking at a meeting with Mayor Kevin Kiely and Fine Gael councillors, they said that compared to Dublin, Cork and Galway, Limerick city is not on the map.Chief executive of Limerick Chamber, Maria Kelly, was acutely critical of the lack of co-operation and goodwill between the Limerick City and County Councils.“There is no messing in Cork’s city centre because there are gardai all over, and in terms of image, Limerick’s is the worst in the country. We have no visitors at the weekends unless there’s a big match – we need to make this a destination city. In Cork, everyone is involved – we need to do the same as what we have now is a crisis situation – people held at knifepoint in their premises is terrible”. Over 100 traders told the FG councillors that they are now literally on their knees. The mayor, on behalf of the nine FG councillors had invited them to voice their concerns which they, as the “pro business party” on the council, would take to the city manager.“We are pro-business and have to decide how best to promote you the traders and stabilise jobs,” Cllr Ger Fahy told one trader, who wanted to know what City Hall is going to do to maintain business in Cruises Street, William Street and throughout the city.Calls were made for free parking days from 11am. It was said that landlords need to be penalised for leaving their premises to run down, “when as it is, we are being served fines for €300 for putting out signage to promote our businesses”.Ger Clancy of Clancy Electrical, said his family had been trading on O’Connell since 1936. They moved to the Parkway Roundabout last autumn, asserting that they had no option as City Hall had ignored their calls for essential parking.“I now have a pup’s chance of letting this main street premises in this ghost town. We must bring in a cardboard clock system of parking which would give people a chance to set the clock for one hour free parking – this would bring people in to do three or four messages at a time”.There was enthusiastic support for another trader’s call to demolish the empty premises in the Opera Centre area.“The few businesses that are still there are isolated and vulnerable, it’s not safe to walk there and in the summer months there is a revolting smell coming from some of these buildings”,The general manager of Brown Thomas said it is essential that a major anchor sets up in the city. The meeting heard from a female retailer how she has been held at knifepoint in her shop on three occasions. Twitter WhatsApp Advertisementcenter_img Linkedin Email NewsLocal NewsTraders vent anger at city’s declineBy admin – February 18, 2010 604 Previous articleMinimum 12 hour wait for 46% of A&E patientsNext articleWorrying ‘remedy’ to drugs debt adminlast_img read more

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Brick thrown through window of moving car

first_imgLinkedin WhatsApp NewsLocal NewsBrick thrown through window of moving carBy admin – September 12, 2012 535 Print Twitter AN O’BRIENSBRIDGE motorist had an horrific experience when a rock was fired at his car, shattering his window and cutting his arm.Anthony Hayes was driving past the railway tracks at Longpavement last week when a person jumped out and hurled a rock at his jeep.The window shattered and shards of glass came flying in, cutting his arm. Anthony’s wife, Leeanne Hayes, contacted the Limerick Post to warn other drivers about the incident.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up “It was dreadful. He was in complete and utter shock. Luckily, there was no-one behind him as he had to really break hard. It was a terrifying experience,” Leeanne said. The incident happened so quickly that Mr Hayes couldn’t see whether the person who threw the rock was an adult or not. The incident happened at around 9.30pm.Leeane said that her husband contacted the gardai to report the matter “and we were told this is not the first time this has happened along there. It was very traumatic and we wanted other drivers to be aware that this has happened along that road”.center_img Previous articleTwo convicted of soliciting sex from undercover gardaiNext articleParents and children warned of suspicious approaches admin Email Facebook Advertisementlast_img read more

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Lifetime achievement award presented to Spengler and Buckley

first_imgThe New England Office of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has awarded the Harvard Extension School’s John Spengler and George Buckley an Environmental Merit Lifetime Achievement Award in recognition of their exceptional work and commitment to the environment. The award recognizes the two as outstanding environmental advocates who have dedicated their lives toward preserving and protecting the New England region’s natural resources.Spengler is director of the Sustainability and Environmental Management Program at Harvard Extension School and Akira Yamaguchi Professor of Environmental Health and Human Habitation at the Harvard School of Public Health. Buckley is assistant director of the Sustainability and Environmental Management Program. They received their awards at a special ceremony in Boston on April 22, the 40th anniversary of Earth Day.“This is well-deserved recognition for Jack Spengler and George Buckley,” said Michael Shinagel, Harvard dean of Continuing Education and University Extension. “Their commitment to the environment transcends the classroom and provides an inspiring model for our graduate sustainability and environmental management students to follow.”last_img read more

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Midwest summer storms threaten ozone, study warns

first_imgStorms common to the Midwest in summer create the same ozone-damaging chemical reactions found in polar regions in winter, according to a new Harvard study. And with extreme weather on the rise, people living in the region could face an increased risk of UV radiation.Powerful storms in the Great Plains inject water vapor that, with temperature change, can trigger the same chemistry eroding the Arctic ozone, according to a new paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.The paper was led by James G. Anderson, the Philip S. Weld Professor of Atmospheric Chemistry at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences.Graphic: James Anderson/Harvard UniversityResearchers tracked on average 4,000 storms each summer penetrating into the stratosphere over the central U.S., a rate far more frequent than previously thought, sparking a call from the paper’s authors for weekly forecasts of ozone loss.“These developments were not predicted previously and they represent an important change in the assessment of the risk of increasing UV radiation over the (region) in summer,” said Mario J. Molina of the University of California San Diego, the 1995 Nobel Prize winner in stratospheric chemistry, who was not involved in this research.The study’s authors say the lack of data recorded on ozone loss in the Midwest has curtailed researchers’ ability to forecast increases in UV radiation in the region, heightening risk for residents of Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas, Nebraska, Iowa, Missouri, the Dakotas and states that border the Great Plains.“Rather than large continental-scale ozone loss that occurs over the polar regions in winter characterized, for example, by the term Antarctic ozone hole, circumstances over the central U.S. in summer are very different,” Anderson said.Stratospheric ozone is one of the most delicate aspects of habitability on the planet, researchers point out, with only marginally enough to protect humans, animals and crops from UV radiation.“Every year, sharp losses of stratospheric ozone are recorded in polar regions, traceable to chlorine and bromine added to the atmosphere by industrial chlorofluorocarbons and halons,” said Steven C. Wofsy, the Abbott Lawrence Rotch Professor of Atmospheric and Environmental Science at SEAS and co-author of the study. “The new paper shows that the same kind of chemistry could occur over the central United States, triggered by storm systems that introduce water, or the next volcanic eruption, or by increasing levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide. We don’t yet know just how close we are to reaching that threshold.”last_img read more