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Akridge and Plaut Assume Interim Roles at Purdue

first_img SHARE Home Indiana Agriculture News Akridge and Plaut Assume Interim Roles at Purdue SHARE By Andy Eubank – Jul 4, 2017 Plaut to Interim Ag DeanThere is administrative change happening at Purdue University and it includes the College of Agriculture. With Provost Deba Dutta now the Chancellor of Rutgers University, effective July first the role of interim provost has been handed over to Purdue Ag Dean Jay Akridge.“He reports to directly to the president of the university and kind of oversees the research teaching, extension mission across the whole university.”That is Associate Dean for Research and Faculty Affairs Karen Plaut, and she is now serving as interim dean of the College of Agriculture. She shared her thoughts with HAT on her shift in responsibilities at Purdue.“It’s an opportunity and a pleasure to serve the college,” she said. “It’ll be lots of fun working across all the missions of the college. I also still get to work with my old boss, Jay Akridge, so I’m really happy to have him in that role and still get to work with him, so I’m excited about the opportunity to continue to move the college forward and really continue in the tradition that Jay did.”Plaut acknowledges that the popular and effective Akridge leaves big shoes to fill.“Jay has been a wonderful boss and it’s great to be working with him and I’ll do the best I can to fill those shoes. There will be an interim associate dean for research, Shawn Donkin. He’ll do much of the work that I was doing. There are a few pieces that will continue to do just to continue to shepherd those opportunities and move them forward.”She said Purdue will begin a search this fall for the permanent provost position.“At this point I’m pretty sure they’re going to do an internal search, and then people will apply and once that search process is over they’ll appoint a permanent provost.”Plaut added to her diverse background when she arrived at Purdue in 2010 as the associate dean for agriculture research. Facebook Twitter Akridge and Plaut Assume Interim Roles at Purdue Facebook Twitter Previous articleDow AgroSciences Helping Farmers in KenyaNext articleRyan Martin’s Indiana Ag Forecast for July 5, 2017 Andy Eubanklast_img read more

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Jakarta MRT developer keen not to dig up trouble in route expansion

first_imgThe expansion of the Jakarta MRT line is under way, building on a successful launch last year. But unlike the first phase of development that resulted in a 15.7-kilometer line connecting South and Central Jakarta, phase 2A offers a bigger and more unlikely challenge.With the next phase of development set to happen entirely underground, PT MRT Jakarta is wary of accidentally excavating historical artifacts and other archeological findings in the digging process, possibly resulting in delays.The construction of an underground tunnel along the route, believed to be blanketed in historical value, will require special care so as not to cause any delays for the project, said William Sabandar, president director of the city-owned transportation company. Furthermore, the planned route will run through Kota Tua, formerly an administrative center of the city under Dutch colonial rule, which experts believe may hold numerous historical riches underneath.“[The next phase] has a different scale because the level of difficulty is [exceptionally high], with issues like land subsidence and soft soil, the environment and cultural heritage,” William said earlier this week.Archaeologist Chandrian Attahiyat, a member of the Jakarta Cultural Heritage Experts Team (TACB), acknowledged that the second phase of development would be more challenging.“The MRT phase 2 route presumably contains many artifacts, especially from Monas [ the National Monument] to Kota Tua. Monas alone was situated within the Weltervreden area, which was once the site of the new capital city that was relocated from Kota Tua or Batavia,” he said on Wednesday. But Indonesia won’t be the first country to deal with such concerns.The completion of an 8.5-mile undersea rail tunnel, part of the Marmaray intercontinental railway network in Istanbul, Turkey, was originally scheduled for completion in 2009. But the project was delayed for four years due to the discovery of archaeological artifacts from the fourth century Byzantine Era, the New York Times reported.The development of MRT phase 2A in Jakarta, funded by the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA), is scheduled to be completed by March 2026. It has been delayed three months from the original plan due to the COVID-19 outbreak.The plan spans 5.8 kilometers from Bundaran HI Station in Central Jakarta to the Kota Tua district in West Jakarta. It will consist of seven underground stations: Thamrin, Monas, Harmoni, Sawah Besar and Mangga Besar stations in Central Jakarta, as well as Glodok and Kota stations in West Jakarta.In an effort to prevent any more delays, the company put together a team of experts, including archaeologists and cultural heritage experts, before construction commenced on July 15.The firm, in consultation with the team, has since performed an archaeological test pit, a method which aims to identify heritage remains through small-scale excavation.“[We did this] because we know it usually takes time to gather experts, conduct examinations and make decisions on whether an object is classified as a piece of cultural heritage,” MRT Jakarta construction director Silvia Halim told journalists on Tuesday.“The team will investigate and conclude the status of the findings – including where to preserve it – within 21 days. With this approach, we can take action without compromising progress in the project,” she said.The company is examining several fragments of ceramics that its construction workers and the expert team recently found while digging along Jl. MH Thamrin and through a structural brick near Monas, Silvia said.In the 19th century, a residential area was once situated on the site where Jl. MH Thamrin runs through, right in the vicinity of Sarinah. Meanwhile, before Monas was erected, a number of large buildings, including a police station and church, were situated there.The discrepancies in land use have contributed to the historical characteristics of remains that may potentially be found in said areas, Chandrian said.“[Artifacts] in Monas could probably be found in the form of structures. The soil [in Weltervreden] often gets heightened due to floods,” he said.Heading toward Kota Tua, the archeologist said there might potentially be a discovery of remains of wooden foundations. He said people in the past would have set up wooden foundations first to distribute strength equally for a building’s structure due to the unstable soil on site.Depending on the significance of the archeological findings, the company may choose to alter its plan for the MRT line.“If a significant archaeological finding is discovered, [the expert team] will give its recommendations to MRT Jakarta to change their project plan. This could be done by shifting or deepening the track because artifacts are commonly found 10 meters underground,” Chandrian said.The significance of the discovery will depend on a number of factors, such as its notable relevance to history and the size of the object found, among other things.The Jakarta Cultural Agency’s protection department head, Novriandi S. Husodo, said the team of experts was likely to suggest thorough documentation – called preservation by record – even if the findings turned out not to be of significant historical value.More importantly, he said the establishment of an expert team and its corresponding work procedures would prove to be a good example for future large-scale infrastructure projects and provide a “win-win solution”.“The findings won’t hinder development and the development won’t erase historical information.. Both aspects can work together,” Novriandi said.Topics :last_img read more

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Dembele – The best is yet to come

first_imgMousa Dembele believes the best is yet to come at Tottenham, even suggesting they are capable of challenging for the title in the coming years. The halcyon days of Champions League football under Harry Redknapp have become an increasingly distant memory in recent years, with big-name arrivals unable to secure Spurs’ place back at the top table. Things are looking up once again at White Hart Lane, though, with a trip to Wembley for the Capital One Cup on the horizon, as well as a realistic chance of finishing in the top four. “Of course it is a big compliment and I think everybody in this team wants to be at the top of their game. “Me as well, but I am not thinking about other things. “Every day I focus on being as sharp as possible and with this manager as well, training is different than we’re used to. It’s much harder. “I think it is a good thing for us and I think it is easier to develop then to become a better player. “I know I can do better. I think we played well today but I think even the team can do better because we know we have a lot of talent, a lot of experience. We have everything here.” Dembele certainly appears to be enjoying himself at Spurs right now, impressing in the role of number 10 behind the “unbelievable” Kane. He praised head coach Mauricio Pochettino for bringing a “positive energy” to the camp, while saying the squad depth at his disposal keeps everyone on their toes. Dembele appears to now be embracing the challenge brought by the abundance of quality in the Spurs squad, having not so long ago suggested he was struggling to cope with his lack of game time. “It was not frustrating,” he said. “It is just never fun as everyone wants to play, but you can see the manager rotates a lot because we have a very good squad, a big squad. “At the moment, we are playing well as a team so I think it is something nice for everyone. “It is a different thing if you don’t play and you’re used to playing. “Now, I know how it is like this as well and the manager gave me a chance and I will do everything to continue like this. “It is easy as well with a team like this, playing incredibly well, but, yeah, I think everybody has to fight and everybody gets a chance in this team.” Key to that have been standout performances from the likes of Harry Kane, Christian Eriksen and Hugo Lloris, as well as the fact Spurs appear to finally have ridden themselves of their inability to compete against the Barclays Premier League’s best. Tuesday’s trip to Liverpool will be another test of that after a north London derby win Dembele described as the “total package” – a defeat of Arsenal, he suggests, is the tip of the iceberg. Asked if this Spurs team, should they be kept together, are capable of challenging for the title in the coming years, the Belgian said: “Yeah, you see as well how the club works now, the feeling that they want to keep a lot of players here. “They extended the contract as well, so it is a very positive thing because the players that you saw now that have extended their contract are very good players, young players as well, who in the future will make massive progression. “It is a very good thing for everyone. Everybody knows if the team is together for a long time, it gets easier and easier.” Things are certainly looking up for Spurs and, on a personal level, Dembele, who has recently shown flashes of his undoubted potential. His inability to produce that on a more regular basis frustrated former Spurs coach Les Ferdinand, who believes the Belgium midfielder could be good enough to follow Luka Modric and Gareth Bale to Real Madrid. “As a player, I don’t think about that,” Dembele said, when those comments were put to him. Press Associationlast_img read more