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MAYFest To Bring Rusted Root, Ozomatli, And Dar Williams To Upstate New York For Memorial Day Weekend

first_imgToday’s festival scene is oftentimes saturated with sameness. If you only enjoy live music and camping under the stars, then this formula is a recipe for success ad infinitum. Like many of the friendly faces attending this year’s MAYfest, however, I often find myself in search of more – more variety, more meaningful connections, and a more holistic experience of forming a temporary community of like-minded folk. If you too share this desire, consider attending MAYfest over the upcoming Memorial Day weekend.Held May 26th-28th at Surprise Lake Camp in Cold Spring, NY, MAYfest – both an acronym of music, arts, and yoga as well as a pun for the timing of this annual gathering – is a truly unique and immersive experience. Designed to blur the lines between music, community, art, yoga, creative expression, and a shared sense of self, MAYfest is as unique a festive jamboree as they come.The musical lineup is equally as diverse: with headliners Rusted Root, Ozomatli, and Dar Williams, there is no shortage of variety. Other featured musicians and bands include DJ Drez, Dustin Thomas, Will Evans with Rising Tide, The Garcia Project, Upstate Rubdown, Hayley Jane and the Primates, Srikala, The Breakneck Boys, and more!For the painters, photographers, sculptors, and dreamers among us, MAYfest has partnered with the Garrison Art Center to once again provide an endless array of opportunities for self-expression throughout the entire weekend. Professional artists-in-residence include: Jaanika Peerna, Christina DiMarco, and Robert Sturman, to name just a few.Tying the entire weekend together through flow, relaxation, and breath, MAYfest will also feature an extensive array of interactive classes and workshops exploring a variety of yogic styles for participants at all levels. Each and every program will be taught by some of the region’s absolute best yogis: Elena Brower, Sadie Nardini, Amy Pearce-Hayden, Jessica Bellofatto, and many others from the Catskills and Hudson Valley regions.MAYfest is also deeply family focused, offering fun workshops for children and their parents throughout the weekend. In the spirit of inclusion and service, MAYfest is also partnering with the Veterans Yoga Project (VYP), a non-profit organization that works to bring the healing powers of yoga to our veterans and their families. A nationwide Memorial Day campaign to honor fallen troops will culminate on Sunday afternoon during VYP’s Introduction to Mindful Resilience Yoga. And for anyone who has served in the US armed forces, MAYfest is proud to offer a 20% discount.From the folks who brought you the immensely popular Catskill Chill Music Festival, MAYfest is sure to offer you and your family a warm and friendly weekend gathering for community-minded folks in search of programming variety in an inclusive environment. Tickets are currently available for the entire weekend, with additional options for single-class tickets and day passes. Discount tickets are available for children under 12, while children under 5 are admitted free with an adult.last_img read more

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Disciplinary details

first_imgFlorida Bar programs designed to help lawyers avoid mistakes that could land them in the grievance system appear to be working, as the number of lawyers disciplined has declined in recent years. Despite that decline, the Bar with the one exception of the Board of Dentistry continues to discipline a higher percentage of its members than professions regulated under the Department of Business and Professional Regulation and the Department of Health, according to 1999-2000 fiscal year figures. And the Bar does it in a system that is much more open to public involvement than both DBPR and Department of Health. A comparison of Bar grievance statistics and those from other professions shows that, as a whole, the Bar was almost twice as likely to discipline one of its members. “What is abundantly clear is that The Florida Bar and the Florida Supreme Court take regulatory responsibility very seriously,” said Bar President Herman Russomanno. “The Florida Bar’s regulatory system is highly rated among other states, and we have again confirmed that it is highly effective in Florida.” The disciplinary rate for lawyers is 0.64 percent, while the disciplinary rate is 0.06 percent for certified public accountants, 0.56 for contractors, 0.33 percent for engineers, 0.31 for Realtors, 0.32 percent for doctors, 0.45 for nurses, and 1.15 for dentists (see chart). While the number of lawyers has steadily increased from 56,379 in 1996-97 to 61,014 in 1999-2000, the number of final orders in disciplinary cases in that time frame has decreased from 428 to 391. In 1996-97, there were 36 disbarments, 127 suspensions, 66 public reprimands, 36 disciplinary resignations, 88 admonishments, and 71 probations of 428 total final orders (with four injunctions). In 1999-00, with 4,635 more total members of the Bar, 35 lawyers were disbarred, 132 were suspended, 43 were publicly reprimanded, 30 resigned, 57 were admonished, and 93 were placed on probation, out of 391 final total orders (with one injunction). “I hear the rumor that lawyers are doing better, which is great for the citizens of Florida. Instead of just disciplining lawyers, what we’re trying to do is equip them to be better lawyers with our diversionary programs,” said Tony Boggs, director of the Bar’s Legal Division. Those diversionary programs include grievance mediation, fee arbitration for resolving clients’ fee disputes, ethics school, and a new program launched this month called the Attorney and Consumer Assistance Program. The ACAP program will feature full-time lawyers and staff personnel available to speak directly to consumers about problems with their lawyers and, hopefully, resolve those problems faster and avoid going through the full-blown grievance process. “It’s modeled after what we think is the best of the best, and should diminish the number of grievances,” Boggs said. “When people call The Florida Bar and say they have a problem with a lawyer, before ACAP, all we could do is give them information on disciplinary procedures and give them pamphlets so they could make a decision on their own whether there was enough of a problem for them to file a grievance,” Boggs explained. “Now, with ACAP, we will have staff people available to speak to them to determine whether they have a gripe or a disciplinary complaint. We will find out what is the nature of the problem and determine whether it can be resolved without filing a grievance,” he said. For example, the problem may simply be: “My lawyer won’t return my phone calls.” ACAP will help forge a speedy resolution between the parties. And that, Boggs said, will be not only good for the frustrated client, but for the attorney who will have an opportunity to settle problems without the full force of The Florida Bar getting involved. In addition, the Bar provides regulatory and professional activities that include a continuing education program with ethics requirements, lawyer speciality and certification programs, consumer education programs, and a security fund to reimburse clients who have lost money through a lawyer’s wrongful taking. “Even House Speaker Tom Feeney recognizes the excellent work the Bar does, saying `The Florida Bar has done a remarkably good job of disciplining its errant members.’ [The Florida Bar News, March 1],” Russomanno said. “Gov. Jeb Bush should also be pleased that the Bar is the ideal of a `privitized’ government function, with no economic cost to taxpayers,” Russomanno said. Besides prosecuting lawyers who violate rules, the Bar actively protects the citizens of Florida against the unlicensed practice of law. Currently, public members make up 45 percent of the unlicensed practice of law and fee arbitration committees. The Bar’s diversionary programs are more extensive than those for other professions. Professionals regulated by DBPR, for example, may receive a letter of guidance, but the department is issuing fewer of those than in the past, said spokeswoman Lonnie Parizek. In a prepared statement in the DBPR annual report, Secretary Cynthia Henderson said: “Our philosophy for licensing is that we, the state, must work proactively to ensure that the professions and businesses we license provide a reliably high quality of service. It is our goal to enhance the perceived value of a Florida license, among our licensees and those they serve. We believe that this can be accomplished through continuing education of our licensees and their customers, our citizens and visitors.” The only profession in Florida with a greater disciplinary rate than lawyers at 0.64 percent (391 actions for 61,014 lawyers) are dentists. Of 10,317 dentists licensed to practice in Florida, there were 119 actions, giving dentists a 1.15 disciplinary rate for 1999-00 fiscal year. Diversionary programs for dentists entail simply a letter of guidance from the Board of Dentistry, which “tells dentists they have stepped over the line and here’s how to avoid doing it again,” said Tallahassee dentist Richard Chichetti, president of the Florida Dental Association who served on the regulatory Board of Dentistry from 1986 to 1994. Such letters of guidance, he said, are for infractions of a lesser nature. If a dentist’s problem involves drug or alcohol abuse, the board diverts them to the Physician Recovery Network, Chichetti said, “because sometimes an addicted dentist may be doing everything ethically right and needs help.” From his perspective of serving on the board of dentistry for eight years, Chichetti said, “We took discipline very seriously. Dentists don’t want those practicing who are unethical or above the law. When you have one bad guy, it reflects on all of us.” The code of ethics of the Florida Dental Association, he said, “in many instances, holds practitioners to an even higher standard than what the law reads.” For example, there is no law that says a dentist can’t sell toothbrushes or dental devices to patients and not disclose that the dentist shares in the profit, or that the same products are available cheaper somewhere else. But the ethical code of the FDA does spell out that dentists must disclose that information to their patients. Unlike other professions, The Florida Bar’s disciplinary arm is an open and participatory process at all levels, with a high level of public involvement in the oversight of attorneys. Public members compose at least one-third of local grievance committees, and investigations are subject to scrutiny at every stage. In regulatory matters handled by other agencies, after a consumer files a complaint, he or she is largely left out of the process, may not attend probable cause hearings and, if no probable cause is found, may not access any records related to the complaint. contrast, the Bar shows copies of a lawyer’s response to the complaining consumer, who may attend grievance committee hearings when the lawyer is present. After a case is closed, the records except for confidential client matters become public even if no probable cause is found. No other regulatory body in Florida will confirm that a specific complaint has been filed against a professional until probable cause has been found. The Florida Bar will confirm receipt of complaints and that a complaint is under investigation. “The Bar continues to improve and expand its function to ensure that the legal profession in Florida exhibits the highest principles of duty and service to the public, their clients,” Russomanno said. March 15, 2001 Regular News Disciplinary detailslast_img
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Leaders in average loan balances (2Q18)

first_img continue reading » Helping members achieve home ownership in a high-priced urban market has helped IDB-IIC FCU($564.2M, Washington, DC) achieve measures of member engagement that put it among the top leaders in loan balances, according to data from Callahan & Associates.As of June 30, 2018, the District-based cooperative reported an average loan balance of $82,427, which placed it seventh by that measure among all 5,596 U.S. credit unions.The 10,873-member credit union is owned by members and employees of the Inter-American Development Bank and Inter-American Investment Corp., which provides financing and other support for development in Latin America. As for the credit union, it provides financing and support for members in our nation’s capital. ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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CDC, states weigh usefulness of school closures

first_img Public Health Seattle and King County, in its revised school closure guidance posted yesterday, said its policy change is an enhanced version of the approach it uses for seasonal influenza and is based on what is known about the new influenza virus and its spread. The guidance notes that the new strain, already spread widely, will continue for some time and that illness severity doesn’t appear to be greater than typical seasonal influenza. Schools that have a confirmed novel influenza case have three options: remain open with the individual isolated at home, close schools based on public health and community assessment, or close schools for a set number of days based on CDC guidance, which could change. Therefore, he said, the CDC is considering changing its advice from automatically closing schools to asking schools and parents to weed out sick children and individually send them home for at least a week. The CDC’s advice to close schools for 2 weeks has been “very aggressive—you may only get one chance to get out in front of a new infectious disease,” Besser said. But the rapid spread of the virus across the country, plus information from multiple locations that the spectrum of disease is about as severe as average seasonal flu, has caused the agency to reconsider. Besser said that, in those areas, parents are asked to check their children in the morning, and, if they are sick or are starting to feel a little sick, to keep them home for a full 7 days, even if they start to feel better before that period is up. In addition, schools and individual teachers are asked to take a close look at children as they arrive in the morning and to send them home if the school believes they are developing illness—for 7 days or until they are proven not to have flu. That procedure is already followed in Canada and in Seattle, which “asks people to really push hard on personal responsibility,” Besser said, and today Minnesota followed suit. Health and education officials in that state released updated school closure guidance that asks parents and teachers to identify and isolate children who have a fever and a recent onset of flu-like symptoms. Acting CDC director Dr. Richard Besser said in a press briefing that the virus is so widespread in the United States that “closing the schools as a means of not letting [the novel flu] spread through the community is not very effective.” “The fact that the novel influenza is currently behaving like regular flu does not mean we can relax,” said Sanne Magnan, MD, Minnesota commissioner of health, in a press release today. “Seasonal flu is a major health concern in its own right. It’s one of our leading causes of death, year in and year out.” As the outbreak progresses, laboratory diagnosis will identify a shrinking proportion of cases, as testing demand exceeds capacity and many people who have mild infections won’t see their doctors. “Closing schools where cases happen to be diagnosed while leaving most schools with undiagnosed cases open does not make sense as an ongoing influenza control strategy in our community,” the department said. May 4, 2009 (CIDRAP News) – The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) signaled today that it will change its current recommendation—which is to close schools for at least 2 weeks when a confirmed case of novel H1N1 swine flu is found among students—as health officials in the Seattle area and Minnesota scaled back their guidance to reflect more of a seasonal influenza approach. “I would expect that as we get more information we will be looking to revise that guidance,” he said. Minnesota officials today unveiled similar guidance aimed at keeping students and staff with influenza symptoms out of schools, rather than routinely closing schools. They said in a statement that it’s not possible to identify every case of novel influenza, because the symptoms mimic those of other respiratory diseases. “We also know that we have other acute viral respiratory infections circulating in Minnesota,” they said in the statement. Public Health Seattle and King County has several tools for schools and parents on its Web site, including a guide for parents on when to keep a child home from school, a flu symptom checklist, and advice on how to care for someone who has influenza. “Individualized school closure based on reports of diagnosed cases is less effective, in addition to being impractical, as a control measure,” the Seattle-King County health department said. However, officials added that, consistent with seasonal influenza policy, some schools might be closed if large numbers of students or faculty become ill. Minnesota officials also said they are developing enhanced school-based surveillance for influenza-like illnesses.last_img read more

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Wellington Police Notes: Wednesday, August 27, 2014

first_imgWellington Police notes for Wednesday, August 27, 2014•8:20 a.m. Officers took a report of found eye glasses in the 200  block N. C, Wellington.•9:42 a.m. Randall B. Wolverton, 61, Buckner, Mo. was issued a notice to appear for speeding 55 mph in 40 mph zone radar and expired registration.•10:30 a.m. Shawn V. Howell, 29, Wellington was arrested on a city of Wellington Warrant for criminal trespass and assault.•10:30 a.m. Officers took a report of lost drivers’ license in the Wellington.•12:42 p.m. Michael K. Graves, 47, Oxford, was issued a notice to appear charged with speeding 54 mph in a 40 mph zone.•1:03 p.m. Bahram Eskandarion, 54, Wellington was issued a notice to appear charged with speeding 57 mph in a 40 mph zone.•6:58 p.m. Officers investigated criminal threat and criminal trespass of a known suspect in the 900 block W. 7th, Wellington.•10:14 p.m. Officers investigated criminal damage to property and criminal trespass in the 1200  block S. Jefferson, Wellington.last_img read more