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Blogger.com accessible again

first_img RSF joins Middle East and North Africa coalition to combat digital surveillance Reporters Without Borders welcomes the decision by the Internet Services Unit (ISU) to again allow access to the blog tool blogger.com. The ISU, the agency in charge of censoring the Internet in Saudi Arabia, declined to explain its decision to Reporters Without Borders, which contacted it by phone and then by e-mail. Blogger.com ended up being censored for only two days, on 4 and 5 October. News RSF_en Organisation Reporters Without Borders welcomes the decision by the Internet Services Unit (ISU) to again allow access to the blog tool blogger.com. The ISU, the agency in charge of censoring the Internet in Saudi Arabia, declined to explain its decision to Reporters Without Borders, which contacted it by phone and then by e-mail. Blogger.com ended up being censored for only two days, on 4 and 5 October.______________________________________________________________4.10.05Saudi agency blocks access to blogger.comReporters Without Borders today called on the Internet Services Unit (ISU), the agency that manages Web filtering in Saudi Arabia, to explain why the weblog creation and hosting service blogger.com has been made inaccessible since 3 October, preventing Saudi bloggers from updating their blogs.“Saudi Arabia is one of the countries that censors the Internet the most, but blog services had not until now been affected by the ISU’s filters,” the press freedom organisation said. “The complete blocking of blogger.com, which is one of the biggest blog tools on the market, is extremely worrying. Only China had so far used such an extreme measure to censor the Internet.”Reached by Reporters Without Borders, the ISU recognised that it had blocked access to blogger.com but did not give any reason. Blogger.com is the point of entry to the management interface for all the weblogs hosted on this tool. In other words, this is the webpage bloggers need to access to update their blogs. According to our tests, names under the blogger.com domain (for example, www.myblog.blogger.com) are not however being filtered. This means that Saudi Internet users can still access the blogs hosted on this service.The Saudi authorities acknowledge blacklisting more than 400,000 websites. A very wide range of sites are affected, including political organisations, non-recognised Islamist movements and publications containing any kind of reference to sexuality.The ISU (www.isu.net.sa) is the agency in charge of the Saudi Web censorship system. It manages the gateway used by all local ISPs and is thus able to control all Internet data exchanges. However, it just carries out instructions issued by the Saudi security services and does not itself decided what must be censored. The ISU offers an online form and e-mail address ([email protected]) that allows Internet uses to report what sites they would like to see blocked. Hundreds of such requests are received each day and are dealt with by a team assigned full-time to the job. The ISU’s filtering system uses technology acquired from the US company Secure Computing.Blogger.com is a service provided by the US company Google.The error message : News Help by sharing this information Saudi ArabiaMiddle East – North Africa Receive email alerts Follow the news on Saudi Arabia to go further October 6, 2005 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Blogger.com accessible again News Saudi media silent on RSF complaint against MBS April 28, 2021 Find out more NSO Group hasn’t kept its promises on human rights, RSF and other NGOs say June 8, 2021 Find out more March 9, 2021 Find out more Saudi ArabiaMiddle East – North Africa Newslast_img read more

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Council supports justice for ‘Magdalene’ women

first_imgEmail NewsLocal NewsCouncil supports justice for ‘Magdalene’ womenBy admin – July 7, 2011 528 JUSTICE for the thousands of women who were incarcerated in Magdalene laundries, including Limerick, has the backing of City Council. Cllr Maurice Quinlivan, referring to the proposals to decide how the government will respond to demands for an independent investigation into the Magdalene laundries, said:Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up “This is an opportunity to show support and to acknowledge the suffering of these women and the failure of the State to protect them and ensure that restitution is made”.He has submitted a Notice of Motion to support the Justice for Magdalenes Survivor Advocacy Group’s call on the State to offer a formal apology to survivors. The United Nations Committee Against Torture expressed its grave concern at the failure to protect the women and girls involuntarily confined in Magdalene laundries.Pointing out that thousands were placed in laundries in Limerick and across the State, Cllr Quinlivan said:“They were treated as prisoners, worked like slaves and were subjected to horrifying levels of physical and psychological abuse – these were so called fallen women held against their will and dehumanised by the people in charge. “It is now almost 20 years since the exhumation of remains of 155 women held in the Magdalene laundry in Drumcondra, many buried without names or death certificates, which led to the formation of the Magdalene Memorial Committee, now called Justice for the Magdalenes”.Referring to the previous government’s argument that as the laundries were privately owned and operated, they did not come under the terms of the Residential Institutions Redress Board, Cllr Quinlivan said that the United Nations Committee against Torture had been informed that the courts regularly sent women and girls to the laundries as an alternative to jail, while others were transferred from industrial schools, the responsibility of the State.Cllr Kieran O’Hanlon, who lived close to the Good Shepherd Convent in Limerick, cautioned against victimising all nuns, many of whom, he said, are now elderly.“They should not all be blackened – some of them were probably victimised also”. Cllr John Gilligan said there had been “good and bad in these institutions.“Some years ago, I was disturbed to discover that the biggest headstone in Mount St Lawrence Cemetery had no names inscribed. I drew this to the attention of the council and we succeeded in having 170 names of women who had been in the Limerick laundry inscribed.“I recall hearing of a young girl who was kidnapped off the streets in Limerick and put into the laundry – she disappeared behind walls, and I also think of the rich people in Limerick who had their shirts laundered by these girls and women – we all deserve criticism”. Advertisement Facebook Twittercenter_img ‘I was disturbed to discover that the biggest headstone in Mount St Lawrence Cemetery had no names inscribed….’ Print Linkedin WhatsApp Previous articleGrand Prix racing returns to city streetsNext article‘Until Bill produced, we’re debating a press release’ – Cllr Kennedy adminlast_img read more