Posted on Leave a comment

Turkuaz Announces East Coast Spring Tour

first_imgBrooklyn-based nine-piece funk outfit Turkuaz has announced an upcoming batch of east coast spring tour dates, which will see the band cover ground all the way from Vermont to Florida, with plenty of stops in between. Aqueous will be joining the fun at select stops on Turkuaz’s extensive “Life In The City Tour”.Turkuaz’s lengthy tour comes in support of their recently released album, Life In The City, which marks Turkuaz’s fifth album, following up 2015’s Digitonium. Notably, one of the album’s nine tracks, “If I Ever Fall Asleep”, was produced by Talking Heads keyboardist Jerry Harrison and engineered by ET Thorngren.The newly added tour dates will begin in State College, PA’s State Theatre on April 4th, before stops at Hartford, CT’s Infinity Hall (4/5); Brooklyn, NY’s Brooklyn Steel (4/6); Ithaca, NY’s The Haunt (4/11); Washington, D.C.’s 9:30 Club (4/12); Charlotte, NC’s The Underground (4/13); Burlington, VT’s Higher Ground (4/18); Woodstock, NY’s Bearsville Theater (4/19); Boston, MA’s Paradise Rock Club (4/20); Charleston, SC’s Pour House (4/25); Tampa, FL’s Crowbar (4/26); with a final show at Miami, FL’s North Beach Bandshell on April 27th.Tickets for the newly announced shows go on sale this Friday, January 25th at 10 a.m. local time. For ticketing and more information, head to the band’s website here.Turkuaz “Life In The City Tour” (newly added dates bolded):January 23 Fayetteville, AR @ George’s Majestic LoungeJanuary 24 Dallas, TX @ Deep Ellum Art CompanyJanuary 25 Austin, TX @ Antone’sJanuary 26 Houston, TX @ Last Concert Café^^January 29 Tucson, AZ @ 191 Toole ^^January 30 Phoenix, AZ @ Last Exit Live ^^January 31 Solana Beach, CA @ Belly Up ^^February 1 Los Angeles, CA @ Teragram Ballroom ^^February 2 San Francisco, CA @ The Fillmore ^^February 5 Ashland, OR @ Ashland Armory $$February 6 Bend, OR @ Domino Room $$February 7 Eugene, OR @ HiFi Music Hall $$February 8 Portland, OR @ Wonder Ballroom $$February 9 Seattle, WA @ Neumos $$February 10 Bellingham, WA @ Wild Buffalo $$February 12 Missoula, MT @ Top Hat Lounge ++February 13 Bozeman, MT @ The Rialto ++February 15 Frisco, CO @ 10 Mile Music Hall ++February 16 Denver, CO @ Ogden Theatre ++March 5 Snowmass Village, CO @ Bud Lite Hi Fi Concert SeriesMarch 7 Kansas City, MO @ Knuckleheads ^^March 8 St. Louis, MO @ Delmar Hall ^^March 9 Milwaukee, WI @ Miramar Theatre ^^March 10 Detroit, MI @ El Club ^^March 14 Louisville, KY @ Gravely BrewingMarch 15-16 Columbus, OH @ St. Fatty’s Daze FestivalApril 4 State College, PA @ The State Theatre ~April 5 Hartford, CT @ Infinity Hall ~April 6 Brooklyn, NY @ Brooklyn Steel ~April 11 Ithaca, NY @ The HauntApril 12 Washington, DC @ 9:30 Club ~April 13 Charlotte, NC @ The UndergroundApril 18 Burlington, VT @ Higher GroundApril 19 Woodstock, NY @ Bearsville TheaterApril 20 Boston, MA @ Paradise Rock ClubApril 21 Atlanta, GA @ Sweetwater 420 FestivalApril 25 Charleston, SC @ The Charleston Pour HouseApril 26 Tampa, FL @ CrowbarApril 27 Miami, FL @ North Beach BandshellMay 3 New Orleans, LA @ Tipitina’sMay 26 Napa, CA @ Bottle Rock Festival^^ with Paris Monster$$ with Object Heavy++ Eminence Ensemble~ w/ AqueousView All Tour Dateslast_img read more

Posted on Leave a comment

August 1, 2004 Letters

first_img Gay Adoptions August 1, 2004 Regular News Let me preface this criticism by noting that the care of children should be foremost among the pressing concerns for any state. This requires an open and balanced debate on what constitutes the best policy for handling child welfare issues. It is with that need for a balanced approach in mind that I sat stunned after reading the July 15 article on the Family Law Section having voted to support gay adoptions.I have rarely encountered a more biased, politically correct valentine of an article. Regardless of whether one supports or opposes the ban on gay adoption, how can there be a balanced perspective on the issue when a supposedly objective article in the News clearly presents only one side of the debate — and in the most glowing and uncritical phraseology? While various sources were quoted throughout the article supporting gay adoption, such as an ACLU attorney, there was no reference to any opposition on lifting the ban. Moreover, there was no effort to depict grounds which reasonable people may have for supporting continuation of the ban. Does the reporter automatically presume that it’s an impossibility for reasonable people of goodwill to differ on this issue?If a genuine policy debate is to be promulgated by the News on any topic, then the publication should at minimum attempt to adopt an objective journalistic standard. Would it be too much to ask for reporters to seek additional sources of perhaps slightly differing opinion? Or to undertake basic investigation on major policy disputes? Mitchell A. Meyers Raleigh, NCGrievance Survey This is in response to the June 15 News story headlined “Commission gets grievance survey.”I am now winding up my third and final year as a public member of a grievance committee in the 13th Judicial Circuit. I agreed to serve on the committee because I was hopeful some of my prejudices about attorneys, accumulated over 35 years as a CPA in public practice, might be eased.During my service I have been impressed with the dedication and diligence of my committee, and am very satisfied we have fulfilled expectations a reasonable and informed public should accept. I responded to the survey myself, and contributed to the 97 percent approval rating returned by grievance committee members.I am, however, alarmed by the 14 percent satisfaction rating from complainants, which suggests, at least to this public member, that somehow the public is not convinced the grievance process really works and tends to believe “it is only a conspiracy by the lawyers to protect their own.” Further, I understand this circuit, alone, needs seven grievance committees, each with approximately the same caseload, to address the volume of public grievances.Unfair and unreasonable though public expectations may be, the gap between the admirable efforts of the grievance committee process and public perception of the legal profession, and its miscreants in particular, is damning, and a ticking time bomb at the very heart of the central mechanism of a stable society.It must be acknowledged some of the complaints our committee has considered had no merit, some were rooted in a client’s disappointment in the results of a meritless case, or perhaps personality conflicts, et al. However, the public perception, as evidenced in the 14 percent satisfaction rating, seems to be much different and suggests that perhaps some of the $10 million spent each year on the process needs to be directed to satisfying the public the process is working, and effectively so.I hope the survey will help the Bar’s Special Commission on Lawyer Regulation to narrow the gap between public satisfaction and the dedicated, diligent efforts of the various committees to render sound and equitable decisions. Richard D. Flemings LutzVirgil Hawkinscenter_img According to a letter in the June 15 News, “[a]s late as 1957, the Florida Supreme Court, by a 5-2 decision, ruled it would not order the University of Florida Law School to admit a qualified black man, Virgil Hawkins, even though the U.S. Supreme Court had ordered it to do so.” Unfortunately, the writer does not provide us with a citation to the alleged order from the U.S. Supreme Court.The Hawkins case made five appearances in the U.S. Supreme Court. On November 13, 1951, Mr. Hawkins’ “[p]etition for writ of certiorari to the Supreme Court of Florida [was] denied for want of a final judgment.” 342 U.S. 877.On May 24, 1954, “the case [was] remanded for consideration in light of the Segregation Cases decided May 17, 1954.” 347 U.S. 971. This is not a direct order to admit Mr. Hawkins. As ordered, the Florida Supreme Court proceeded to “consider” the matter. 83 So. 2d 20.On March 12, 1956, the U.S. Supreme Court acknowledged that its 1954 order cited the wrong case. The Segregation Cases, involving elementary school children, had no application to Mr. Hawkins, who was seeking admission to a law school. Mr. Hawkins’ case was governed by Sweatt v. Painter, 339 U.S. 629, Sipuel v. Board of Regents, 332 U.S. 631, and McLaurin v. Oklahoma State Regents, 339 U.S. 637, all of which predated the Brown decision. The U.S. Supreme Court declared that Mr. Hawkins “is entitled to prompt admission under the rules and regulations applicable to other qualified candidates.” This is not necessarily a direct order to admit Mr. Hawkins. The order is capable of being construed as merely a direction to consider his application for admission under the rules and regulations that apply to every other applicant. The Florida Supreme Court gave it the latter interpretation. 93 So. 2d 354.The U.S. Supreme Court’s 1956 order is poorly written for another reason. The first sentence is “[t]he petition for certiorari is denied.” Further along, the U.S. Supreme Court states that “[t]he petition for writ of certiorari is granted.” The last words of the 1956 order are “Certiorari denied.”The State of Florida moved for rehearing, which the U.S. Supreme Court denied without comment on April 23, 1956. 351 U.S. 915. Not surprisingly, the Florida Supreme Court made the most of the confusing 1956 opinion. 93 So. 2d 354.On October 14, 1957, the case made its fifth and final appearance in the U.S. Supreme Court. Mr. Hawkins’ “[p]etition for writ of certiorari to the Supreme Court of Florida [was] denied without prejudice to the petitioner seeking relief in an appropriate United States District Court.” 355 U.S. 839.In my view, this inept performance by the U.S. Supreme Court, and its failure to deal with the Florida Supreme Court in a forthright and peremptory manner, is at least equally responsible for the injustice that was perpetrated on Mr. Hawkins, and accordingly, the U.S. Supreme Court must bear at least an equal portion of the blame. John Paul Parks Phoenix August 1, 2004 Letterslast_img read more

Posted on Leave a comment

Mallard’s Team of the Week — Trafalgar Thunder Girl’s Volleyball Team

first_imgVolleyball is definitely back on the sports map at Trafalgar Middle School as the Thunder once again ran away with the West Kootenay Grade 8 Girl’s Volleyball Championships.The Thunder swept past Grand Forks Wolves 2-0 in the best-of-three final by scores of 15-7, 15-5.The other Trafalgar squad also was victorious, outlasting host Mount Sentinel Wildcats 15-9, 15-10. Mallard’s Source for sports would like to salute the entire program. The teams include, Breanne Steffani, Brianna Jones, Amelia Savazzi, Raven Sperling, Madeline Holitzki, Ashland D’Alessandris, Lennox Lockhurst, Gabby Bobby, Avie Waterfall, Aliza Jones, Leola Belkin, Emma Chirico, Angela Sabzevari Gonzalez, Sabien Edney, Madison Hopkyns and Coach Staci Proctor.last_img