Posted on Leave a comment

Violence against reporters during 11 days of protests in Armenia

first_img April 9, 2021 Find out more Receive email alerts April 25, 2018 Violence against reporters during 11 days of protests in Armenia to go further Forum on Information and Democracy 250 recommendations on how to stop “infodemics” Credit: Karen Minasyan / AFP News RSF calls for a fully transparent investigation after mine kills two journalists in Azerbaijan Help by sharing this information News Russian peacekeepers deny foreign reporters access to Nagorno-Karabakh RSF_en Follow the news on Armenia November 11, 2020 Find out more June 8, 2021 Find out more Reporters Without Borders (RSF) deplores the acts of violence against journalists during 11 days of anti-government protests in Yerevan, from 13 to 23 April, and calls on the Armenian authorities to ensure they do not go unpunished. The peaceful outcome to this “velvet revolution” – Serzh Sargsyan’s resignation as prime minister on 23 April – must not divert attention from the fact that some violence did take place and that at least 16 journalists and media workers were attacked, mainly by police officers, while covering the protests.“We condemn the unjustified use of force against journalists who were just doing their job,” said Johann Bihr, the head of RSF’s Eastern Europe and Central Asia desk. “The advent of a new era in Armenia must include abandoning such practices and combatting impunity. We urge the authorities to conduct full and impartial investigations into each of these attacks. All those responsible, whether police officers or not, must be brought to justice.”Several journalists were deliberately targeted by police while using cameras. Alina Sargsyan, a reporter for the CivilNet.am news website, was hit by a police officer while she filmed police arresting demonstrators. Azatutyun TV producer Anatoly Egiazaryan was beaten by several policemen while filming a demonstration being dispersed.Police damaged Factor.am reporter Vrezh Margaryan’s camera and smashed Radio Azatutyun reporter Nayra Bulgadaryan’s camera to the ground in order to prevent them from filming.Violence was used to prevent CivilNet.am reporter Tatul Hakobyan from filming the attempted arrest of the protest movement’s main leader, Nikol Pashinyan. Public radio reporter Liana Egiazaryan was injured by a stun grenade in similar circumstances. Ani Keshishyan of 168.am and Factor.am cameraman Hovhannes Sargsyan were injured by non-lethal weapons used during clashes between police and protesters.Violence by plainclothes police became more frequent as the protests in Yerevan grew in size. Many journalists reported being attacked by plainclothesmen. They included Ani Grigoryan of CivilNet.am, Arus Hakobiyan of Radio Azatutyun, Tehmine Yenokyan of Lragir.am and Artak Hulyan of Shant TV. Tirayr Muradyan, a reporter for the Sut.am news website, was badly beaten on 19 April by plainclothes police who did not like being filmed. The next day, police bundled him into a car to prevent him covering a demonstration on a motorway near Yerevan. After subsequently receiving orders to release him, they returned him to the place where they had arrested him.Factor.am editor-in-chief Arevik Sahakyan, his cameraman, Gevorg Martirosyan and public radio reporter Vruyr Tadevosyan were beaten up by unidentified individuals in different parts of the capital. In some cases, policemen looked on without making any attempt to intervene.A group of demonstrators also stormed into the Armenian public radio broadcaster’s headquarters on 14 April, demanding to be allowed to speak on the air. A studio door was broken. The police quickly launched a criminal investigation and arrested two suspects.Armenia is ranked 80th out of 180 countries in RSF’s 2018 World Press Freedom Index. News ArmeniaEurope – Central Asia Condemning abusesProtecting journalists ViolenceFreedom of expression News ArmeniaEurope – Central Asia Condemning abusesProtecting journalists ViolenceFreedom of expression Organisation last_img read more

Posted on Leave a comment

Murder investigation begins after fatal stabbing

first_imgAdvertisement NewsLocal NewsMurder investigation begins after fatal stabbingBy admin – January 18, 2012 498 Facebook Print Previous articleEagles soar to final spotNext articleMentors sought for Le Cheile Mentoring Project admin A MURDER garda investigation is to get underway in Limerick after a 43-year-old man was found outside a house with multiple stab wounds by members of the ambulance service. The man was found by the emergency services outside a house on Lenihan Avenue shortly after 12.30am in the early hours of Wednesday morning.  Gardai from Roxboro were alerted to attend the scene and they say that the man was found on the steps outside the front door of the house in the city with multiple stab wounds and he was taken to the Mid Western Regional Hospital.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up WhatsApp Twitter Linkedin However the man was later pronounced dead.The State Pathologist’s office attended the scene which has been sealed off and a technical examination of the area is being carried out by the Garda Technical Bureau.A postmortem is to be carried out on the remains.It is understood that the victim was known to gardai and was from the area. Emaillast_img read more

Posted on Leave a comment

Crustal thickening along the West Antarctic Gondwana margin during mid-Cretaceous deformation of the Triassic intra-oceanic Dyer Arc

first_imgSubduction-related Mesozoic mafic dykes in eastern Palmer Land, Antarctic Peninsula, record the developmentof an intra-oceanic arc terrane, the Dyer Arc, probably of late Permian–Triassic age, represented by atholeiitic dyke group. Arc rocks were deformed in late Triassic–early Jurassic and mid-Cretaceous times onthe Gondwana margin. Eruption of syn- to post-mid-Cretaceous orogenesis magmatism is represented by acalc–alkaline group of dykes. The tholeiitic dykes intruded immature granitic crust of the Eastern Zonesub-terrane of the Central Domain, one of the magmatic terranes of the Pacific margin of Gondwana. Thecalc–alkaline dykes straddle the major tectonic boundary between the Central Domain and the continentalmargin Eastern Domain. 132 dykes were studied, 82 of which are calc–alkaline, 48 tholeiitic and two shoshonitic,across an area of approximately 4000 km2. Tholeiitic dykes strike broadly NNW–SSE, transposed intoparallelism with the strike of the tectonic boundary during Cretaceous orogenesis whereas calc–alkalinedykes strike tightly ESE–WNW at a high angle to the boundary. The tholeiites pre-date late Triassic deformationand metamorphism, and are interpreted as dominantly Triassic in age, whereas Ar–Ar dated calc–alkalinedykes are younger (~100 Ma and ~97 Ma) and field relations indicate that they overlap with the waning phaseof the mid-Cretaceous Palmer Land Event. The tholeiites have trace element abundances similar to, but moredepleted than, those of modern intra-oceanic arcs, as recorded by Zr/Hf ratios. Nb/Yb versus TiO2*/Yb andSm/Yb versus La/Sm plots are used to model depths of partial melting. The tholeiites were mostly generatedat shallow depths corresponding to 2.5 and certainly less than 3.0 GPa in largely garnet-free mantle. Thecalc–alkaline magmas were generated at pressures greater than 3.0 to possibly >3.5 GPa, in the garnet zone.The deepening of the mantle source, and onset of calc–alkaline magmatism are interpreted to have beencaused by deformation of the intra-oceanic arc terrane on the Gondwana margin, and lithospheric thickeningduring the Palmer Land Event.last_img read more

Posted on Leave a comment

Dutch roundup: Deutsche Bank, Sanoma, Aegon, Stap

first_imgThe €367m Dutch pension fund of Deutsche Bank is to change its pension arrangements from defined benefit to collective defined contribution (CDC) to limit volatility on its balance sheet as a result of the DB plan.On its website, it said the employer would contribute more than €21.6m as a “dowry”, as well as to pay for transition costs.Under the new CDC plan, the combined premium would rise from 29.9% to 32.4%, with a ceiling of 33%.As a consequence of the CDC arrangements, the employer will no longer pay additional contributions. Because an agreement with the sponsor to invest defensively has also been terminated, the pension fund will be able increase its return portfolio from 15% to 25%.The €2.9bn pension fund of Delta Lloyd also recently switched its pensions arrangements from DB to CDC, while in recent years the pension funds of asset managers Robeco, ABN Amro, ING and Achmea and merchant bank NIBC have taken similar steps.In other news, the closed €550m Dutch pension fund of publishing firm Sanoma has decided to transfer the pension rights of 500 pensioners and 3,500 deferred members to the general pension fund (APF) Stap, run by asset manager Aegon and its subsidiary TKP.Its active participants have been accruing pension rights at the €21.5 Pensioenfonds PGB since last year.The pension fund is to join a multi-client compartment of Stap, as it had the same views on risk as the Sanoma scheme, with an indexation target of 50%, according to Paul van Driessen, its vice-chair.Koos Guis, a member of the steering committee for the future of the pension fund, said a joint compartment in the APF would offer the scheme a better perspective, as the number of participants in the closed pension fund is decreasing.The current funding of the Sanoma scheme is 110.5%.last_img read more

Posted on Leave a comment

Men’s basketball off to lackluster start

first_imgIt’s hard to believe there was a part of the season when the USC men’s basketball team held a No. 10 rank.Andy Enfield expects a better performance from his players during his fifth season as the head coach of the USC men’s basketball team. Photo by Will Alpert | Daily TrojanSince the start of the season, the team has fallen to 11-6, taking losses to ranked and unranked opponents and is on its way out of the top 25. To be fair, it’s been a wild season of NCAA basketball so far, with teams like Kansas and Kentucky tumbling into double-digit rankings after dropping major losses both at home and on the road. Last week alone, three of the top five teams fell to unranked opponents, completely shifting the rankings yet again. While it might be a topsy turvy season for the country as a whole, the Trojans have themselves to blame for their sudden and furious descent out of the national rankings. The team entered the season with a full return of a talented crop of starters bolstered by several fresh faces. Before the first tip-off of the season, it appeared that the Trojans’ NCAA run of last season might continue and expand this year. Months later, even head coach Andy Enfield, who is known for standing by his players, seems at a loss.“I usually take the blame for losses, and obviously every game goes on my record as a head coach,” Enfield said after an 81-88 loss to Washington. “But tonight, I was very disappointed in some of our upperclassmen, defensively. You can blame me for not motivating them or getting them to play up to their capability. They have to go home and look in the mirror and come back and play better basketball if we’re going to have a chance to win games in this league.”The easiest way to analyze any team’s failures is to study its losses. Most often, the Trojans struggle when they dig themselves into a hole by allowing their opponents to build up a lead, often failing to reclaim it. In four of its six losses this season, USC entered the half with a deficit, launching a valiant comeback attempt only to fall slightly short. Win or lose, the Trojans typically score less frequently in the first half than in the second, a habit that isn’t uncommon for any team, given that defense is best played with fresh legs. However, the team’s underperformance in the first half has been a consistent issue. Even in victories over teams such as New Mexico State, USC often enters the second half with a tie or a razor-thin lead.Part of this deficit can be attributed to shooting. The Trojans are currently shooting below 50 percent from the field, but they have especially struggled against ranked opponents, highlighted by a dismal 28 percent performance against Texas A&M. Despite averaging 14 trips to the line per game, the Trojans have struggled similarly with free throws, failing to deliver in close-game situations. The team missed 10 of its 21 free throws in a loss against Cal. At first, they weren’t necessarily bad losses. Dropping to now-No. 11 Texas A&M is not necessarily worth mourning, and falling to wonderkid Trae Young and now-No. 7 Oklahoma is a similarly manageable loss. But the meltdown against Princeton, which resulted in a 10-point overtime loss at home to an unranked Ivy League team, followed by a home loss to Washington burst the bubble that USC belonged at the top of the NCAA. This weekend’s heartbreaker against Stanford reflected the truth — the Trojans just don’t have it this season. “We should’ve taken care of business,” senior guard Jordan McLaughlin said after the team blew a 15-point deficit to lose to Stanford. The captain repeatedly described the loss as “tough,” emphasizing how difficult it was to lose on a buzzer-beater shot. Yet he didn’t seem to have an answer for why the Trojans still haven’t learned to hang onto a lead.The main issue with this team lies in the fact that even though the Trojans are winning games, they aren’t winning by enough to convince anyone of their dominance. Four of the team’s 11 victories have ended with single-digit leads. Winning by 5-point margins over teams such as Middle Tennessee and New Mexico State simply won’t cut it. Although the Pac-12 isn’t the power conference it hoped to be at the start of the season, boasting only two top-25 teams, it will still provide consistent competition for the Trojans as they attempt to rebuild and salvage this could-have-been season. With a 2-2 record, the team sits in the dead center of the conference rankings. However, no Pac-12 team is undefeated in conference play even this early in the season, and no team in this conference is unbeatable in any way.Perhaps the brightest light of this season so far has been McLaughlin, who averages 12.9 points and 7.8 assists per game. Although McLaughlin isn’t the team’s leader in points or steals, he remains the heartbeat of the Trojans on both offense and defense, and in big-game situations, he’s the leader that the team desperately needs. Whether it’s notching 19 assists against UC Santa Barbara or putting up the would-be game-winner against Stanford, McLaughlin has proven his worth as the senior captain of the squad. And this is his team to turn around as the Trojans continue into conference play.Their Final Four dreams might be distant, but for now, a conference title is a promising and achievable goal for the Trojans.last_img read more