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“Only a free press can hurt them”

first_img Help by sharing this information RSF_en Organisation May 3, 2010 – Updated on January 25, 2016 “Only a free press can hurt them”center_img Calling for the release of journalists and netizens imprisoned in Iran, Reporters Without Borders and Iranian exile journalists staged a demonstration outside the Iranian embassy in Paris today to mark World Press Freedom Day.To chants of “Freedom for journalists in Iran now” and “Mahmoud, predator,” they tipped hundreds of paper pellets into the embassy’s courtyard as a symbol of the Reporters Without Borders campaign “Only a free press can hurt them.”Those taking part included Tunisian journalist Taoufik Ben Brik, who was released just four days ago after six months in a Tunisian jail, Reporters Without Borders vice-president Fabrice Drouelle, who is a journalist with France Inter, and Iranian photographer Reza Deghati.See slideshow: Newslast_img read more

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New proposal to support Limerick jobseekers with real jobs

first_imgSinn Féin believes that quality work experience programmes can provide a useful means of enhancing skills and providing a valuable first step into the world of work. They also claim that the current system displaces paid work, depresses wages and facilitates abuse by some employers.Cllr Quinlivan explained that as part of his party’s proposed scheme tailored internships would be developed sector by sector in full co-operation with trade unions and Education and Training Boards. Employers, he said, would be supported to be the best mentors that they can be. Facebook Twitter “We propose an internship scheme that supports jobseekers to attain real quality jobs without limiting the number of proper job vacancies available. Sinn Féin’s proposals maximise decent pay for decent work,” he said. Limerick Artist ‘Willzee’ releases new Music Video – “A Dream of Peace” Print NewsLocal NewsNew proposal to support Limerick jobseekers with real jobsBy Alan Jacques – February 26, 2015 662 Predictions on the future of learning discussed at Limerick Lifelong Learning Festival Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed live Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live TAGSCllr Maurice QuinlivanJobBridgelimerickLimerick jobsSinn Fein center_img WhatsApp by Alan [email protected] up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Cllr Maurice QuinlivanLIMERICK Sinn Féin councillor Maurice Quinlivan believes his party’s newly launched proposals on internships provide a credible, workable and thoroughly necessary alternative to the “despised” JobBridge scheme.Following the launch of Sinn Féin’s ‘Displacing JobBridge’ strategy for an alternative internship scheme this week, Cllr Quinlivan said that the JobBridge scheme launched by the Fine Gael and Labour Party Government in June 2011, was “an absolute disaster.”“While some individuals may have had a positive experience, it is a scheme that leaves thousands of jobseekers vulnerable to exploitation. It has already reduced the number of real job opportunities available and if it is not closed down now, thousands of new entry level positions that should come into being in the months and years ahead will emerge as unpaid internships instead,” he said.According to the City North councillor, Sinn Féin propose to replace the “one-size-fits-all” JobBridge scheme with a new participant centred model for internships. He also said that he envisages a substantial increase in the range of apprenticeships available.“The model we propose would not displace apprenticeships, paid in-work training or jobs. It would afford those genuinely in need of some work experience with meaningful learning opportunities.” Advertisement Previous articleMunster face Glasgow as Limerick sides meet in #UBLNext articleRattling good tales from The Boneyard bodies Alan Jacqueshttp://www.limerickpost.ie RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Linkedin Vanishing Ireland podcast documenting interviews with people over 70’s, looking for volunteers to share their stories WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads Emaillast_img read more

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Worms Work Better.

first_imgChemicals are routinely tested on lab mice before they’re placedon the market. A new technique used in a University of Georgialab may reduce the number of mice needed for testing.Phil Williams, an environmental health scientist with the UGACollege of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, uses microscopicworms called nematodes to determine the toxicity of chemicals.Worms Cost Less and Work Better”When new chemicals are developed, at some point, animaltesting is required,” Williams said. Using animals in testingrequires proper facilities and a lot of money.”Plus, many people don’t like mice, or any animals withfur, being used for these tests,” he saidThe nematode Williams uses, Caenorhabditis, is foundnaturally in the soil. Its nervous system functions much likethat of humans. “It can’t show everything in relation tohumans, but there’s a lot we can learn from it,” Williamssaid.Mice and rats, most commonly used for laboratory testing, aren’talways the best choices. “The closer biologically an animalis to a human, the more likely we can predict human reactions,”he said.Won’t Replace Higher Animals Williams is finding nematodes very effective in early stagesof toxicity testing. But he doesn’t expect them to replace otheranimals entirely.”At some point, higher animals are always going to haveto be used,” he said. “There are some things you justcan’t learn without using higher animals.Nematodes’ effectiveness in testing for toxicity could reducethe number of new chemicals tested.”A company could make a thousand new chemicals and couldnever afford to screen them all using higher animals,” hesaid. “Using the nematode, we can easily and quickly determinewhich new chemicals to continue testing.”For chemical testing, nematodes are still in the developmentstages. But on the environmental side, they’re much closer tobeing used outside the lab.Quicker Soil Tests In Less Soil”Sinceit’s a soil organism, I’ve use it to predict environmental affectsof chemical exposures,” Williams said. He also uses themwhen testing soil samples for toxicity.Earthworms are used for soil tests, too, but they require alarger soil sampling, and results take up to 14 days. The nematodetest uses just 3 grams of soil and gives results in 24 hours.”Earthworms require about 400 grams of soil for testing,”Williams said. “When you’re working with hazardous soil,you’d much rather work with just 3 grams.”Analytical soil tests are so advanced they can detect minuteamounts of chemicals on a site. But detection isn’t enough.”The biological effects to humans and animals aren’t answeredby these tests,” he said. “You have to use organismsto see what the biological effect will be.”In December, the American Society for Testing Materials plansto vote on adopting the use of nematodes for soil testing.Used For Food Science Testing TooNematodes may have other uses, too. Williams is working withUGA food scientists to detect food-borne pathogens. Nematodesappear to have great potential in detecting clostridium botulinum,the organism that causes botulism.”Botulism affects the nervous system, which makes thenematode a perfect testing specimen,” he said.Williams also uses nematodes to test new medical imaging agentsfor a pharmaceutical company. “These agents are taken internallyfor medical diagnostics and then traced through the body,”he said. “The company can chemically make these productsfairly easily, but screening and approval is a long process.”Nematodes can greatly streamline the screening.In the future, Williams sees nematodes greatly reducing thenumber of mice and rats used in laboratory testing.”You could release a chemical into the environment for20 to 30 years and then look back and see what the effects were,but that’s not ethical,” Williams said. “You could exposehumans to the chemicals, but we would never do that. So we haveto use animal models to try to help us predict effects.”last_img read more