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Tablets all round from Age Friendly Limerick

first_imgLocal backlash over Aer Lingus threat Shannon Airport braced for a devastating blow Linkedin RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Housing 37 Compulsory Purchase Orders issued as council takes action on derelict sites TAGSCommunityLimerick City and Countylocal newsNews Facebook Twitter Email Advertisementcenter_img Limerick on Covid watch list Print Mary Cronin, from Croom, Chair of the Limerick and National Network of Older Peoples’ Councils, taking a selfie with Cllr James Collins, Mayor of Limerick City and County.Photo by Diarmuid GreeneWHEN Age Friendly Limerick says “we have a tablet for that” they don’t mean a little bottle of pills.More than 30 older people from across County Limerick have been presented with special electronic tablets as part of a programme to reduce incidents of social isolation and open up a new world of communication.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Age Friendly Limerick, which is co-ordinated by Limerick City and County Council, in partnership with Cliffrun Media are delivering the project aimed at reducing levels of social isolation among older people, through the use of the Acorn Tablet.The Acorn is a specialised tablet, tailored to address the needs of seniors in a closed secure network. It opens up a world of relevant online content for seniors, encouraging users to engage and interact at both social and commercial level. Its design is built around five content and application pillars: independence, health, finance, communications and security.Pictured during a workshop hosted by Limerick City and County Council are Claire O’Gorman, Carmel Wilmott and Joan Curtin, all from Newcastle West, Co. Limerick.Photo by Diarmuid GreeneAnd its ease of use will be welcomed by anyone who is not particularly familiar with on-line technology.The interface is simple to navigate, provides easy access to a help button as well as providing remote technical assistance when required.A user can start with only one or two apps loaded and, over time, additional elements can be added according to the users individual preferences.The idea is that by becoming connected to what’s going on in their area, older people will be better able to attend local events or ask for a lift. It will also make it easier to do their online banking, or pay a bill.And they can connect with their children, friends or family members living abroad through SkypeA major element of this project will be engagement between the older people and Transition Year students from Desmond College in Newcastle West.Five intergenerational workshops will connect old and young and provide an opportunity for the younger people to support the older people in the use of technology.Deputy Mayor Michael Collins said: “In a world which is becoming more technology driven, it is important that we support and encourage our older citizens in embracing the digital world.  It is fantastic that we are using technology to help make people fell less isolated.”Age-Friendly Limerick Programme Manager Anne Rizzo, said that the Acorn is a very user friendly tablet, designed to open up a world of digital services for older people and is aimed at encouraging social inclusion, putting people in contact with others in their community and helping them to avail of services and information not otherwise easily accessible to them.Funding has been provided by the Department of Community and Rural Affairs covering the cost of the tablets, including sim card and technical backup for the duration of the programme trial period. WhatsApp TechPost | Episode 9 | Pay with Google, WAZE – the new Google Maps? and Speak don’t Type! Is Aer Lingus taking flight from Shannon? Previous articleLimerick v Tipperary to be televised as eirSport unveil Allianz League coverageNext articleColourful makeover for city rehab unit Bernie Englishhttp://www.limerickpost.ieBernie English has been working as a journalist in national and local media for more than thirty years. She worked as a staff journalist with the Irish Press and Evening Press before moving to Clare. She has worked as a freelance for all of the national newspaper titles and a staff journalist in Limerick, helping to launch the Limerick edition of The Evening Echo. Bernie was involved in the launch of The Clare People where she was responsible for business and industry news. NewsCommunityLocal NewsTablets all round from Age Friendly LimerickBy Bernie English – January 16, 2019 1515 last_img read more

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Pro-Test to march despite death threats

first_imgPro-Test, an organisation that favours animal testing, claims that it has been subjected to death threats and violence in the run up to its march through Oxford tomorrow.  The group has given a statement to the Thames Valley Police who are currently attempting to trace the sender of two emails of violent content. In a separate incident two members of the committee were approached and threatened by an individual on Cornmarket Street while promoting Pro-Test literature on a stall.  Tom Holder, a spokesperson for Pro-Test, explained, “The police are taking both incidents seriously. We were initially sent an email, which mistakenly suggested that the UK was still involved in cosmetic testing. We sent a polite reply to this email correcting this mistake. The individual then replied, simply saying, ‘Fuck off’. Then a second reply was sent in which a more serious threat was issued. However given how easy it is to send anonymous emails we expect this incident to turn out to be a childish prank.”The other incident on Cornmarket Street occurred when Kevin Elliot, a disabled member of Pro-Test, and a colleague were distributing leaflets from a stall in the afternoon.  Elliot said, “We were handing out leaflets and a guy came over to us who seemed to be interested, and asked what we were doing. He suddenly started swearing at us, and threw some of our leaflets at us and gave one of us a shove. He turned to me and said, ‘Good job you’re using crutches’ and kicked over a table, which went flying. “We didn’t do anything either to provoke or to retaliate them. As he was walking away, I shouted ‘It’s going to take a lot more than that to stop us.’”He added, “I was sort of expecting it, I think largely the animal rights lobby know they have lost the argument and only a small minority would use violence, who are upset about the idea that we exist. All we were doing was exercising free speech.“What’s important is that we get the message out…I’m happy to face that kind of person again. What scares me is the idea of being silenced, that would be more frightening to me than facing any number of physical threats.”There have been worries that animal rights activists might target the planned march this weekend. It is expected that hundreds of people will turn up in support of the group’s aims, which will process through Oxford from Broad Street at noon. Laurie Pycroft, the teenage founder of Pro-Test claimed that the rally is to “show that students, scientists and the public at large will not be cowed by animal extremists.”by Natasha Vashishtlast_img read more

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Sign of the times

first_imgFront-of-pack nutritional labelling is one of the few catering legislations that bakery retailers usually don’t have to worry about. And with food hygiene, staffing, taxes and other legal paperwork to deal with, it’s an issue few would voluntarily add to their tasks.Legally, any pre-packed food product comes under the Food Labelling Regulations 1996, which denote that “all food which is ready for delivery to the ultimate consumer or to a catering establishment, [should] be marked or labelled.” The requirements stipulate foods must contain a list of ingredients with a quantity indication for certain items, alongside information on storage and a best-before date.But bakery retailers are often exempt from this rule, because they frequently make a good proportion of their stock on-site, to be sold fresh on the day it was made. This means many products are also exempt, as the regulations “do not apply to foods which are not pre-packed when sold to the ultimate consumer; foods pre-packed at the request of the purchaser; or foods pre-packed for sale to the end-consumer.”Labelling benefitsThis being the case, it’s tempting to allow your unlabelled foods to enjoy a reprieve from bureaucracy, but before you dismiss labelling as unnecessary, consider also its benefits.”I believe strongly about food labelling on packaging – perhaps controversially, I believe everybody should be made to label their products responsibly,” says marketing manager Alistair Toal, of Northern Irish bakery Grahams. The family-run outlet has recently taken the move to label its products using the traffic-light system – despite the fact that many are in the red and amber range. This was part of a top-to-bottom corporate social responsibility programme. “We looked at everything from sustainability to our responsibility to the consumer,” he says. “I believe the FSA’s traffic-light system is the clearest and easiest way for the consumer to ascertain the levels of salt and fat and that’s why we chose this format.” Since labels were added to a new line, the effect on sales was difficult to quantify, but PR was positive. “Bakery items have always been seen as a treat, so we don’t think it will stop anyone buying our products,” he reasons.Grahams is urging others to follow its lead and, across the country, a number of weight-loss groups and nutritional information resources are also pressing for information on baked goods to become more widely available.Availability of dataPat Wilson, communications director of online service Weightlossresource.com (WLR) says, “It’s quite frustrating for WLR and its members to be continually told, ’Data is not available for products bought from bakeries’, while most manufacturers and brands are leading the way, giving complete information for their products.”We receive about 50 queries weekly from members asking for the calorie count of bakery products from individual bakeries and supermarket bakeries,” he adds. “We have to find the most similar item we have data for, yet we are in a position where certain outlets and products do not give basic information.”It mystifies us how supermarkets can provide very comprehensive information on their own-brand products, but not their bakery products. People do want to know the nutritional data of foods they eat.”In fact, researchers at Wilson’s have cited bakery pro-ducts as a constant bugbear to maintaining the comprehensive nature of its service, with chains such as Greggs not bothering to reply to requests, and others simply stating “no data available”.With feelings running high, it is little wonder that the Food Standards Agency (FSA) has stepped in and is currently looking at how to approach the issue with bakery retailers. But for the time being, it seems bakery retailers may be caught between a rock and a hard place when it comes to labelling products.”At the moment I wouldn’t advise bakeries to label nutritional values until we have more information from the FSA,” advises Jim Winship of the British Sandwich Association (BSA). “Labelling products correctly is actually quite complicated, and bakeries who put information on labels which is incorrect risk falling foul of Trading Standards.”Unfortunately, it seems that while accurate pack labelling might be easy enough for large supermarkets or sandwich packers, smaller outlets are likely to have a much harder time ensuring consistency – particularly as even a few grams’ discrepancy on an ingredient like salt could turn a well-intentioned practice into a legal risk.”Smaller outlets don’t usually have the facility to monitor what goes into their products as closely as is necessary,” says Winship. “From a large facility, such as a factory, it’s not as difficult to regulate what happens in your products. You’re also more able to offset the costs. At the moment it’s quite expensive to make the kind of nutritional analysis needed for accurate food labels.”So while consumers might be in favour of labelling nutritional content, the industry advice is to hold fire for now. The good news is that the BSA is in liaison with the FSA to introduce new regulations that will afford more leeway to bakery retailers, enabling them to list amounts as more of a guideline, rather than set quantities. Talks are also under way to formulate a ’nutrition calculator’ to calculate what to put on their labels, without having to resort to expensive ingredient analysis.All this might be a few years off, but meanwhile, the BSA is petitioning for guideline nutritional contents in poster form, which can be displayed by retailers. While these won’t list the nutritional quantities of products for specific retailers, they will provide a guide to the type of nutrients consumers might find.It seems likely that if bakery retailers are allowed to label products on nutritional content, how they are labelled will be the next topic. Subway grasped the bull by the horns this month by introducing nutrition guides at counters (see opposite). With supermarkets and the FSA battling over whether the traffic-light system or Guideline Daily Amounts are best, perhaps it’s time bakery retailers involved themselves in the debate, before the choice is made for them.—-=== Food Labelling Regulations 1996 ===Do you know how the labelling law affects you? The current regulations require that: all food which is ready for delivery to the ultimate consumer or to a catering establishment, subject to certain exceptions, [should] be marked or labelled with:l the name of the foodl a list of ingredientsl the appropriate durability indicationl any special storage conditions or conditions of usel the name and address of the manufacturer or packer or of a seller.Exceptions are defined as anything which doesn’t come under the class of pre-packed. So if you bake your own bread on the premises, it need not be labelled. But shipping in packed sandwiches from an external kitchen might subject you to these requirements.last_img read more

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Alliance CEO Craft sees need for consolidation in U.S. coal industry

first_imgAlliance CEO Craft sees need for consolidation in U.S. coal industry FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享S&P Global Market Intelligence ($):The U.S. coal industry “needs” to consolidate in the face of difficult market conditions and sinking coal demand because of the coronavirus pandemic, Alliance Resource Partners LP CEO Joe Craft said on a May 8 earnings call.“Consolidation is needed in the coal space, and we’re a consolidator,” Craft said, commenting on options available to the Oklahoma-based coal producer to survive the uncertainty in the U.S. economy and among fossil fuel industries in particular. “Nothing [is] currently being done but it needs to happen,” he said. “Whether it does or not, I can’t predict. But that needs to happen. And we are a willing participant in that.”Craft did not specify transactions that could occur in the future. In prepared remarks at the beginning of the call, he said the company believes 2020 “will provide a new foundation for future growth of our partnership” and that “we are committed to continuing this strategy.”The drop in electricity demand created by stay-at-home orders and other social distancing efforts in the U.S. appears set to accelerate the decline of the coal industry as energy markets fundamentally transform in the wake of the crisis. Though the pandemic has yet to push U.S.-based coal-fired power plants toward earlier retirements, a Trump administration official recently told virtual attendees of a fuel buyers conference the industry may perform worse than the U.S. government’s already-grim predictions and that coal plants may retire early.Sustainability-focused think tank Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis concluded in a March report the U.S. coal sector would face pressure to consolidate, with the pandemic expected to exacerbate negative market conditions. Current coal production capacity in the U.S. is “unsustainable,” the think tank stated, and 2020 “will very likely see the beginning of a long-overdue rethinking of production capacity in the U.S.”For Alliance, the pandemic has meant withdrawing its full-year 2020 production guidance in late March and temporarily idling its coal mines in the Illinois Basin while reducing production at other mines. The company is now targeting coal sales and production for 2020 of approximately 28 million tonnes and 27 million tonnes, respectively, or 25%-30% lower than originally guided, with plans to draw down inventories in the second quarter and produce in the back half of the year to meet existing contractual obligations, Craft said. In line with losses expected for major coal producers, Alliance recorded a first-quarter attributable net loss of $144.8 million, falling year over year from a net income of $276.4 million.[Jacob Holzman]More: U.S. coal industry needs to consolidate in light of pandemic, Alliance CEO sayslast_img read more

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Man shot to death

first_imgBACOLOD City – A man was shot to death in Barangay Rizal, Silay City, Negros Occidental. Resident Napoleon Besonia Jr., 54, sustained four gunshot wounds on the body, police said. Tagged suspect was 49-year-old resident John Jayme – also resident of the village, the police added. The young Jayme then told his father and this prompted the latter to shoot Besonia around 6:45 p.m. on May 28.center_img According to police investigators, Besonia allegedly threatened to shoot the Jayme’s son at the store of Ronie Guartizo. Besonia was rushed to the Teresita Lopez Jalandoni Provincial Hospital in Silay City where the attending physician declared him “dead on arrival.”Jayme, on the other hand, was detained in the lockup facility of the Silay City police station, facing charges./PNlast_img

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UC Irvine looks for home win vs UCSB

first_imgFor more AP college basketball coverage: https://apnews.com/Collegebasketball and http://twitter.com/AP_Top25___This was generated by Automated Insights, http://www.automatedinsights.com/ap, using data from STATS LLC, https://www.stats.com February 28, 2020 SQUAD LEADERS: The Gauchos have been led by Amadou Sow and Max Heidegger. Sow has averaged 14.3 points and 7.1 rebounds while Heidegger has recorded 16 points per game. The Anteaters have been anchored by Collin Welp and Eyassu Worku, who are averaging 13.3 and 12.2 per game, respectively.CLUTCH COLLIN: Welp has connected on 43.2 percent of the 81 3-pointers he’s attempted and has gone 4 for 8 over his last three games. He’s also made 84.9 percent of his free throws this season.WINLESS WHEN: UC Irvine is 0-6 this year when it scores 61 points or fewer and 20-4 when it scores at least 62.STREAK STATS: UC Irvine has won its last eight home games, scoring an average of 81.3 points while giving up 60.9.DID YOU KNOW: The stout UC Irvine defense has held opposing offenses to a field goal percentage of 38.5 percent, the 11th-lowest mark in Division I. UC Santa Barbara has allowed opponents to shoot 45 percent through 28 games (ranking the Gauchos 283rd).___ Share This StoryFacebookTwitteremailPrintLinkedinRedditUC Santa Barbara (19-9, 8-5) vs. UC Irvine (20-10, 12-2)Bren Events Center, Irvine, California; Saturday, 10 p.m. ESTBOTTOM LINE: UC Irvine looks for its fourth straight win over UC Santa Barbara at Bren Events Center. The last victory for the Gauchos at UC Irvine was a 76-60 win on Jan. 30, 2016.center_img Associated Press UC Irvine looks for home win vs UCSBlast_img read more