Posted on Leave a comment

Tablets all round from Age Friendly Limerick

first_imgLocal backlash over Aer Lingus threat Shannon Airport braced for a devastating blow Linkedin RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Housing 37 Compulsory Purchase Orders issued as council takes action on derelict sites TAGSCommunityLimerick City and Countylocal newsNews Facebook Twitter Email Advertisementcenter_img Limerick on Covid watch list Print Mary Cronin, from Croom, Chair of the Limerick and National Network of Older Peoples’ Councils, taking a selfie with Cllr James Collins, Mayor of Limerick City and County.Photo by Diarmuid GreeneWHEN Age Friendly Limerick says “we have a tablet for that” they don’t mean a little bottle of pills.More than 30 older people from across County Limerick have been presented with special electronic tablets as part of a programme to reduce incidents of social isolation and open up a new world of communication.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Age Friendly Limerick, which is co-ordinated by Limerick City and County Council, in partnership with Cliffrun Media are delivering the project aimed at reducing levels of social isolation among older people, through the use of the Acorn Tablet.The Acorn is a specialised tablet, tailored to address the needs of seniors in a closed secure network. It opens up a world of relevant online content for seniors, encouraging users to engage and interact at both social and commercial level. Its design is built around five content and application pillars: independence, health, finance, communications and security.Pictured during a workshop hosted by Limerick City and County Council are Claire O’Gorman, Carmel Wilmott and Joan Curtin, all from Newcastle West, Co. Limerick.Photo by Diarmuid GreeneAnd its ease of use will be welcomed by anyone who is not particularly familiar with on-line technology.The interface is simple to navigate, provides easy access to a help button as well as providing remote technical assistance when required.A user can start with only one or two apps loaded and, over time, additional elements can be added according to the users individual preferences.The idea is that by becoming connected to what’s going on in their area, older people will be better able to attend local events or ask for a lift. It will also make it easier to do their online banking, or pay a bill.And they can connect with their children, friends or family members living abroad through SkypeA major element of this project will be engagement between the older people and Transition Year students from Desmond College in Newcastle West.Five intergenerational workshops will connect old and young and provide an opportunity for the younger people to support the older people in the use of technology.Deputy Mayor Michael Collins said: “In a world which is becoming more technology driven, it is important that we support and encourage our older citizens in embracing the digital world.  It is fantastic that we are using technology to help make people fell less isolated.”Age-Friendly Limerick Programme Manager Anne Rizzo, said that the Acorn is a very user friendly tablet, designed to open up a world of digital services for older people and is aimed at encouraging social inclusion, putting people in contact with others in their community and helping them to avail of services and information not otherwise easily accessible to them.Funding has been provided by the Department of Community and Rural Affairs covering the cost of the tablets, including sim card and technical backup for the duration of the programme trial period. WhatsApp TechPost | Episode 9 | Pay with Google, WAZE – the new Google Maps? and Speak don’t Type! Is Aer Lingus taking flight from Shannon? Previous articleLimerick v Tipperary to be televised as eirSport unveil Allianz League coverageNext articleColourful makeover for city rehab unit Bernie Englishhttp://www.limerickpost.ieBernie English has been working as a journalist in national and local media for more than thirty years. She worked as a staff journalist with the Irish Press and Evening Press before moving to Clare. She has worked as a freelance for all of the national newspaper titles and a staff journalist in Limerick, helping to launch the Limerick edition of The Evening Echo. Bernie was involved in the launch of The Clare People where she was responsible for business and industry news. NewsCommunityLocal NewsTablets all round from Age Friendly LimerickBy Bernie English – January 16, 2019 1515 last_img read more

Posted on Leave a comment

American Legion seeks help for homeless vets

first_imgLatest Stories Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthMost 10 Rarest Skins for FortniteTCGThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancel “The towels and linens should be new but the dishes and pots and pans could be used items but they should be something that the donor would eat out of,” Hale said. “Items including mops, brooms washing powder, dish washing detergent and bath soap are also needed.“Those who don’t have items to help fill the baskets but would like to contribute may donate money and the unit will purchase items for the baskets.”Donations would be appreciated as soon as possible because the need is immediate.“We would like to be able to pack and deliver all four baskets by July,” Hale said. “The administration at the veterans’ hospital is very appreciative of our efforts to help stock the homes for homeless veterans. There are more of these veterans than people know. We need the of the community with this project and Troy and Pike County are always generous with their giving.” Book Nook to reopen By Jaine Treadwell Skip Print Article Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration Email the author Those who would like to donate items or funds to the efforts of American Legion Post 70 and Unit 70 to assist homeless veterans are encouraged to call Katie Hale at 334-465-1765 to make arrangement for the collection of the donated items. The items may also be delivered to the America Legion Post home on East Walnut Street in downtown Troy on the second Saturday of the month. Hale said Post 70 and the post auxiliary is in the process of collecting four baskets of household items for homes for veterans in need.“For each basket, we need table dishes, including cups and silverware,” Hale said. “We want to include in each basket a dish drainer, dish towels, pots, pans, and other kitchen utensils.”The list of needs also includes blankets, wash cloths, bath towels, flat sheets, pillows and pillow cases. American Legion seeks help for homeless vets Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies Are… Published 3:00 am Thursday, April 21, 2016 American Legion Post 70 and Auxiliary Unit 70 are in the process of packing four baskets for homeless veterans associated with Tuskegee Veterans Hospital.Katie Hale, Unit 70 president, said the veterans’ hospital assists as many as 10 homeless veterans a month.“Some months they may assist as few as one or none but too many months, the numbers are closer to 10,” Hale said. “When the hospital finds living quarters for these homeless veterans, they have to provide for the basic needs of a household and that’s a big expense, especially when they are trying to assist several veterans. We saw a real need and our post and its auxiliary wanted to respond to that need.” Sponsored Content Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits You Might Like TREASURE TALKS: Alabama Treasure Forest group meets at Clay Hill Farms in Pronto The Alabama Treasure Forest Association (ATFA) hosted a meeting of landowners from Pike and surrounding counties at John and Carol… read more By The Penny Hoarderlast_img read more

Posted on Leave a comment

Devastation by degrees

first_imgIn the past two decades, more than 20 percent of the polar ice caps have melted, parts of Greenland are fast disappearing, and the world’s oceans are increasingly acidic, threatening the life they sustain both in their waters and on their shores.The evidence is mounting that the world is warming at alarming rates, but a pending climate conference in Copenhagen next month, aimed at curbing the planet’s carbon emissions, is in danger of failing before it begins.Closer to home the climate change implications are equally bleak.“What global warming means is that [Massachusetts] just moved to North Carolina,’’ said Peter Lehner, executive director of the Natural Resources Defense Council. “It’s a pretty significant change in what it’s going to be like around here.”Lehner, executive director of the Natural Resources Defense Council, delivered that grim message during a discussion this week (Nov. 2) that was part of the Harvard University Center for the Environment’s Green Conversations series.Lehner took part in a session with Daniel Schrag, director of Harvard’s Center for the Environment and professor of earth and planetary sciences and professor of environmental science and engineering, and Joel Schwartz, professor of environmental epidemiology and associate professor of medicine at the Harvard School of Public Health.“There’s no question the world is going to survive. The question is: Will human civilization as we know it survive?” said Lehner.But the news isn’t only bad. Lehner, whose nonprofit group is a major player on the nation’s environmental-advocacy stage, outlined a plan to curb global warming that includes government involvement as well as effective climate policies that mitigate costs and support new, cleaner technology.There is no “silver bullet” to the global warming crisis, said the executive director. The solutions involve better energy efficiency, cleaner fuel, better public transportation options, and increased use of wind and solar power. Limiting the use of carbon and making those who do it pay for an emissions allowance are also essential, he said.Another critical step involves the American Clean Energy and Security Act, which was approved by the U.S. House in June. But getting the bill through the Senate is likely to require 60 votes and a delicate balance of policy and politics, said Lehner, since many senators worry that new energy-efficiency policies will hurt industries in their home states.“We need to take their concerns seriously and devise a bill that both achieves our environmental goals but also addresses these concerns,” he noted.One such compromise would involve coal, which is currently responsible for half of the nation’s electrical supply and is a major factor in producing greenhouse gases. Carbon sequestration is a process that buries carbon pollution from coal deep underground instead of releasing it into the atmosphere. The technique meshes with new climate legislation, said Lehner, since it allows coal usage in a way that “won’t necessarily fry the planet.”Getting the bill through Congress before the climate meeting in Denmark next month will be an uphill battle, admitted Lehner.“Whether or not we will do it in time for Copenhagen, who knows? But hopefully we will do it in time to make a difference for all of you.”Lehner also answered critics who complain that China, a developing nation that is now the biggest producer of carbon emissions, has a responsibility to act ahead of the United States to stop climate change. Using a graph, he showed per-capita data revealing that the United States is still far ahead in terms of its own carbon emissions.He added that carbon dioxide lasts in the atmosphere for about a century.“Much of what’s up there is ours — it’s not China’s — so the effects that are already being caused are from the Western world, and from the United States.“It’s going to be a new energy world for the entire planet,” he added, “and, if it’s not, we are going to be in trouble.”last_img read more

Posted on Leave a comment

Festival marks Indian holiday

first_imgThe Indian Association of Notre Dame (IAND) delivered a sense of traditional Indian culture to the ballroom in the LaFortune Student Center with a Diwali Celebration on Sunday night. The Diwali celebration, known as “The Festival of Lights,” included a prayer service, a dinner of Indian cuisine and a dance celebration featuring Indian music. The Diwali celebration holds great importance to people all across India from a variety of faiths, including Hinduism, Jainism and Sikhism. “Diwali is one of the most important festivals in India, marking the end of the Indian calendar,” Indian Association faculty advisor Jindal Shah said. Five organizations came together to sponsor the Diwali event: the Graduate Student Union, International Student Service and Activities, Campus Ministry and the Indian Association of Notre Dame. The Student Activities Organization (SAO) helped provide the venue for the evening in the LaFortune Ballroom, and Campus Ministry sponsored the Diwali celebration as part of the Prayer from Around the World Series. Prof. Shah began the event with an explanation of the origins of Diwali. He said the story of Diwali spans back into Indian lore and the tale of King Dashratha, whose eldest son Rama was betrothed to the beautiful Sita and was set to inherit the kingdom. However, Rama was exiled by his jealous stepmother for 14 years. Meanwhile, the demon king Ravana kidnapped Sita, leading to a fierce battle between Rama and Ravana that ended in Rama’s victory and the return of his bride Sita. “The people lit candles to mark the return of Rama and Sita, creating the festival of lights that announces the triumph of good over evil,” Shah said. “In the story, Ravana embodies all that is evil, and Rama embodies all that is good.” Graduate student Gaurav Nigam, co-president of IAND, said the Diwali festival required about a month of planning and sought to fulfill several goals. “We wanted to make everyone aware of the Indian festivals and make the Indian students feel at home because we don’t get to celebrate Indian festivals in America very often,” Nigam said. Nigam said the Indian Association typically hosts two major festivals each year. Suresh Vishwanath, a chemical engineering graduate student and co-president of IAND, said those who celebrate Diwali pray for well-being and blessing on this occasion. Attendees of the Diwali celebration at Notre Dame came from many faiths and regions. “Some people here today faced two to three hour drives to help set up and be with us today,” Vishwanath said.   Contact Charley Ducey at [email protected]last_img read more

Posted on Leave a comment

Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

first_imgUnmanned aerial vehicles could soon be a soaring success for Georgia farmers.University of Georgia cotton and peanut researchers in Tifton are excited about the prospect.“You’ve really got to be able to keep up with the technology to stay in business,” said Glen Harris, a UGA Cooperative Extension soil scientist who studies cotton,peanuts and other crops. “We have less growers running more acres. They’re really utilizing all kinds of technology to keep up.”The next stage in technological advancement may lie with unmanned vehicles. Unmanned aerial helicopters used to take images of cotton and peanut research were featured at the Sunbelt Expo grounds in Moultrie on Aug. 20. Harris and fellow UGA peanut team members John Beasley and Scott Tubbs attended to discuss the possible use of unmanned aerial vehicles in agriculture. Although this technology will not be available for commercial use until 2015, the idea of taking aerial photographs of various research plots is an exciting proposition for Harris. “It’s amazing how much in the last 20 years technology has changed. A lot of people think we’re farming like we did 100 years ago. That’s far from the truth,” Harris said. “You think about having this technology to fly over your cotton field to pick up early nitrogen deficiency and low potassium deficiency, and even if we can’t tell the difference between the two, we can go out there and figure out which one it is. The earlier you can detect it, the better chance you have of fixing it.”Harris said the technology would have been especially helpful in diagnosing problems in this year’s cotton crop. “We had a lot of cotton this year that, by the time we realized what (problems) were going on, it was probably too late to fix,” he said. Unmanned aerial vehicles would allow farmers to see early images of their crops and detect any stand issues that might arise early in the planting season. Producers could also look at issues like inoculant failure or why a section of a field might look more yellow than others. If a picture shows additional green images between rows, the farmer can determine whether it’s a sign of weed problems, which can be addressed early in the planting season.When Beasley became a scientist in 1985, he says “precision agriculture” wasn’t even a concept. “These technologies are amazing. Take this imagery with this ability for unmanned flight, combined together, that’s what I think is exciting,” Beasley said.Unmanned aerial vehicles would allow farmers to detect diseases and identify low stand counts at a much quicker rate. The vehicles are a much more precise way to discover issues with a crop, Harris said.“You can’t cover every foot of (a field) walking through it,” Harris said. “I’ve worked cotton 20 years, but I probably could miss something out there without (the overhead camera).”Harris said he can see corn farmers benefiting from an overhead view, too. “Once the corn gets over your head, it’s really hard to see. We can pick up late fungicide problems that are really hard to pick up from the ground once the corn gets tall. It just gives you a lot better perspective,” he said.The project has been researched at the Sunbelt Expo grounds in Moultrie this year, with five acres devoted to peanuts and cotton, each.last_img read more