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Nominate the Vermont Chamber of Commerce “Citizen of the Year”

first_imgDo you know someone who continuously steps forward to help advance and strengthen our Vermont communities? Your ideal civic leader could be the next person to be honored with the statewide Vermont Chamber Citizen of the Year Award.Presented annually for nearly four decades, the Citizen of the Year award is given to a person who: 1) Has made major contributions to the betterment of Vermont; 2) Has distinguished himself or herself through outstanding service to the community; and 3) Typifies the true spirit of service and self-sacrifice in representing the finest ideal of Vermont Citizenship.The 2003 Citizen of the Year will be honored with a special recognition banquet in the fall. The application includes a nomination form, a brief biographical sketch of the nominee, and supporting testimonials. A Selection Committee comprised of Vermont Chamber Board Members and past award winners will select the winner.Last year’s Vermont Chamber Citizen of the Year was The Honorable Barbara W. Snelling. Other past winners include Judge Sterry Waterman (1983), Martha H. O’Connor (1994), Sister Elizabeth Candon (1985), Governor Thomas P. Salmon (1996), Francis G.W. Voigt (2000), and Diane P. Mueller (2001).Please contact Vicky Tebbetts, Vermont Chamber Vice President of Communications, with any questions or to receive a nomination form. ([email protected](link sends e-mail), 802-223-3443 ext 123). The deadline for nominations is July 15, 2003.last_img read more

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Demo Humvee Burns 70 Percent Less Fuel

first_img The Army is displaying a unique fuel-efficient concept tactical vehicle to senior leaders in the nation’s capital. The Fuel Efficient Ground Vehicle Demonstrator, dubbed ‘FED Alpha,’ has a solar panel on its rear hatch that can recharge its electrical system. It also has a custom engine, transmission and a score of other features that dramatically increase its mileage per gallon compared to other Humvees. The vehicle has all the capabilities of an up-armored Humvee, but burns about 70 percent less fuel, said Steve Kramer, an engineer with the U.S. Army Tank and Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Command, known as TARDEC, headquartered in Warren, Mich. Kramer has been involved in designing the FED Alpha for the past three years. TARDEC has been working with a British company on the testing phase of the vehicle at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland since July. The FED Alpha may never be mass produced as is, Kramer said, but added that he hopes many of the energy-saving features can be priced low enough to make it onto the next generation of tactical vehicles. “Hopefully the technology on here can get back into the force,” he said. The FED Alpha features a Cummins turbo-charged 200-horsepower 4-cylinder diesel engine, a six-speed automatic transmission, and low-rolling resistance tires. The low-rolling tires alone provide an estimated 7 percent fuel reduction. While officials said that percentage may not sound like much, if applied to the Army’s entire tactical vehicle fleet, it would add up to about $45 million in fuel savings annually. The vehicle also has a gas pedal that provides the driver feedback if the vehicle exceeds the recommended fuel-efficiency speed. The pedal vibrates and provides force against the driver’s foot, but if it’s mission-essential to increase the speed, Kramer said the driver can punch through the feedback and continue the mission. The FED Alpha also has: • A high-efficiency 28-volt integrated starter-generator that enables electric accessories and 20 kW of onboard power for equipment • A lightweight aluminum structure, except for the armored cab and underbelly V-shaped blast shield • An improved driveline that uses a unique carrier and differential assembly, including non-geared hubs and isotropic super-finished gears to reduce friction The Aberdeen Test Center Roadway Simulator is validating the fuel economy of the vehicle. ATC is the world’s largest automotive test simulator and is designed to perform vehicle dynamics, powertrain performance, shock and vibration testing in a laboratory environment. It enables the FED Alpha to be tested in a controlled environment so small changes in fuel economy can be verified. ATC will test the FED Alpha in convoy operations, urban assault, cross-country trips and extended idle situations. By Dialogo October 25, 2011last_img read more

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August 1, 2004 Letters

first_img Gay Adoptions August 1, 2004 Regular News Let me preface this criticism by noting that the care of children should be foremost among the pressing concerns for any state. This requires an open and balanced debate on what constitutes the best policy for handling child welfare issues. It is with that need for a balanced approach in mind that I sat stunned after reading the July 15 article on the Family Law Section having voted to support gay adoptions.I have rarely encountered a more biased, politically correct valentine of an article. Regardless of whether one supports or opposes the ban on gay adoption, how can there be a balanced perspective on the issue when a supposedly objective article in the News clearly presents only one side of the debate — and in the most glowing and uncritical phraseology? While various sources were quoted throughout the article supporting gay adoption, such as an ACLU attorney, there was no reference to any opposition on lifting the ban. Moreover, there was no effort to depict grounds which reasonable people may have for supporting continuation of the ban. Does the reporter automatically presume that it’s an impossibility for reasonable people of goodwill to differ on this issue?If a genuine policy debate is to be promulgated by the News on any topic, then the publication should at minimum attempt to adopt an objective journalistic standard. Would it be too much to ask for reporters to seek additional sources of perhaps slightly differing opinion? Or to undertake basic investigation on major policy disputes? Mitchell A. Meyers Raleigh, NCGrievance Survey This is in response to the June 15 News story headlined “Commission gets grievance survey.”I am now winding up my third and final year as a public member of a grievance committee in the 13th Judicial Circuit. I agreed to serve on the committee because I was hopeful some of my prejudices about attorneys, accumulated over 35 years as a CPA in public practice, might be eased.During my service I have been impressed with the dedication and diligence of my committee, and am very satisfied we have fulfilled expectations a reasonable and informed public should accept. I responded to the survey myself, and contributed to the 97 percent approval rating returned by grievance committee members.I am, however, alarmed by the 14 percent satisfaction rating from complainants, which suggests, at least to this public member, that somehow the public is not convinced the grievance process really works and tends to believe “it is only a conspiracy by the lawyers to protect their own.” Further, I understand this circuit, alone, needs seven grievance committees, each with approximately the same caseload, to address the volume of public grievances.Unfair and unreasonable though public expectations may be, the gap between the admirable efforts of the grievance committee process and public perception of the legal profession, and its miscreants in particular, is damning, and a ticking time bomb at the very heart of the central mechanism of a stable society.It must be acknowledged some of the complaints our committee has considered had no merit, some were rooted in a client’s disappointment in the results of a meritless case, or perhaps personality conflicts, et al. However, the public perception, as evidenced in the 14 percent satisfaction rating, seems to be much different and suggests that perhaps some of the $10 million spent each year on the process needs to be directed to satisfying the public the process is working, and effectively so.I hope the survey will help the Bar’s Special Commission on Lawyer Regulation to narrow the gap between public satisfaction and the dedicated, diligent efforts of the various committees to render sound and equitable decisions. Richard D. Flemings LutzVirgil Hawkinscenter_img According to a letter in the June 15 News, “[a]s late as 1957, the Florida Supreme Court, by a 5-2 decision, ruled it would not order the University of Florida Law School to admit a qualified black man, Virgil Hawkins, even though the U.S. Supreme Court had ordered it to do so.” Unfortunately, the writer does not provide us with a citation to the alleged order from the U.S. Supreme Court.The Hawkins case made five appearances in the U.S. Supreme Court. On November 13, 1951, Mr. Hawkins’ “[p]etition for writ of certiorari to the Supreme Court of Florida [was] denied for want of a final judgment.” 342 U.S. 877.On May 24, 1954, “the case [was] remanded for consideration in light of the Segregation Cases decided May 17, 1954.” 347 U.S. 971. This is not a direct order to admit Mr. Hawkins. As ordered, the Florida Supreme Court proceeded to “consider” the matter. 83 So. 2d 20.On March 12, 1956, the U.S. Supreme Court acknowledged that its 1954 order cited the wrong case. The Segregation Cases, involving elementary school children, had no application to Mr. Hawkins, who was seeking admission to a law school. Mr. Hawkins’ case was governed by Sweatt v. Painter, 339 U.S. 629, Sipuel v. Board of Regents, 332 U.S. 631, and McLaurin v. Oklahoma State Regents, 339 U.S. 637, all of which predated the Brown decision. The U.S. Supreme Court declared that Mr. Hawkins “is entitled to prompt admission under the rules and regulations applicable to other qualified candidates.” This is not necessarily a direct order to admit Mr. Hawkins. The order is capable of being construed as merely a direction to consider his application for admission under the rules and regulations that apply to every other applicant. The Florida Supreme Court gave it the latter interpretation. 93 So. 2d 354.The U.S. Supreme Court’s 1956 order is poorly written for another reason. The first sentence is “[t]he petition for certiorari is denied.” Further along, the U.S. Supreme Court states that “[t]he petition for writ of certiorari is granted.” The last words of the 1956 order are “Certiorari denied.”The State of Florida moved for rehearing, which the U.S. Supreme Court denied without comment on April 23, 1956. 351 U.S. 915. Not surprisingly, the Florida Supreme Court made the most of the confusing 1956 opinion. 93 So. 2d 354.On October 14, 1957, the case made its fifth and final appearance in the U.S. Supreme Court. Mr. Hawkins’ “[p]etition for writ of certiorari to the Supreme Court of Florida [was] denied without prejudice to the petitioner seeking relief in an appropriate United States District Court.” 355 U.S. 839.In my view, this inept performance by the U.S. Supreme Court, and its failure to deal with the Florida Supreme Court in a forthright and peremptory manner, is at least equally responsible for the injustice that was perpetrated on Mr. Hawkins, and accordingly, the U.S. Supreme Court must bear at least an equal portion of the blame. John Paul Parks Phoenix August 1, 2004 Letterslast_img read more

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Trust: The silver bullet?

first_imgCertain things in life help make things easier. Trust is certainly one of those things.We have share insurance on our accounts. Consumers can trust us when we say their money is safe.Regulation E protects consumers. They can trust that using their debit card is safe. Your child is going to a sleepover. You know and trust the family that is hosting the party. You’ll sleep a little bit better that night.Warranties. Money-back guarantees. All of these things make people feel safe. They can trust that they won’t be hurt.But how does that translate into businesses? Or people?I’m lucky to have met someone who has studied the link between trust and individual and organizational success. His name is David Horsager. continue reading » 1SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Leaders in average loan balances (2Q18)

first_img continue reading » Helping members achieve home ownership in a high-priced urban market has helped IDB-IIC FCU($564.2M, Washington, DC) achieve measures of member engagement that put it among the top leaders in loan balances, according to data from Callahan & Associates.As of June 30, 2018, the District-based cooperative reported an average loan balance of $82,427, which placed it seventh by that measure among all 5,596 U.S. credit unions.The 10,873-member credit union is owned by members and employees of the Inter-American Development Bank and Inter-American Investment Corp., which provides financing and other support for development in Latin America. As for the credit union, it provides financing and support for members in our nation’s capital. ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Did the Coronavirus Really Originate in a Chinese Lab?

first_imgMilley’s statement contradicts that of Brig. Gen. Paul Friedrichs, who denied the notion that the virus originated in a Chinese laboratory as part of experiments involving bioweapons.“And if I could just be clear, there is nothing to that,” Friedrichs, the Joint Staff surgeon, said on April 6. “Someone asked me if I was worried. That is not something that I’m worried about. I think, you know, right now what we’re concerned about is how do we treat people who are sick, how do we prevent people from getting sick. But no, I am not worried about this as a bioweapon.” Reports are now emerging that COVID-19 originated in a Wuhan laboratory not as a bioweapon, but instead as part of China’s effort to prove that it is equal to or better than the United States in identifying and fighting viruses.That is according to multiple sources who have told American media outlets they were briefed on the details of early actions by China’s government and have seen relevant materials.This may be the “costliest government coverup of all time,” one of the sources allegedly said.Those sources believe the first transmission of the coronavirus was bat-to-human, and that “patient zero” worked at the laboratory, and then went into the population in Wuhan.When asked by Fox News’ John Roberts about the reporting, President Trump responded at Wednesday’s coronavirus press briefing, “More and more we’re hearing the story…we are doing a very thorough examination of this horrible situation.”Meanwhile, the top U.S. general said earlier this week that evidence that the coronavirus originated at a Chinese research lab is “inconclusive.” That follows a report from The Washington Post that U.S. officials warned of safety concerns at a research facility in the Chinese city of Wuhan two years ago.“We’ve had a lot of intelligence take a hard look at that,” Joint Chiefs Chairman Gen. Mark Milley told reporters on Tuesday. “At this point it’s inconclusive, although the weight of the evidence seems to indicate natural. But we don’t know for certain.”His comments came just hours after The Washington Post reported that U.S. officials were concerned about inadequate safety at a Wuhan lab that had been conducting studies on coronavirus from bats.According to the newspaper, U.S. officials who had visited the lab dispatched diplomatic cables in early 2018 to Washington, warning the Trump administration about safety and management weaknesses at the lab, and also that the facility’s work on bat coronaviruses represented a risk of a new SARS-like pandemic.last_img read more