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Bill To Mandate Texas vs. Texas A&M Football Series Was Shot Down

first_imgTexas and Texas A&M lined up against each other on the gridiron.COLLEGE STATION, TX – NOVEMBER 24: Patrick Lewis #61 of the Texas A&M Aggies prepares to snap the ball against the Texas Longhorns in the second half of a game at Kyle Field on November 24, 2011 in College Station, Texas. (Photo by Darren Carroll/Getty Images)Since the Texas-Texas A&M series stopped being played in 2011 with the Aggies’ move to the SEC, people across the state have been pining to see them play again. That desire has even extended to statewide politicians, who have tried to mandate the series into law.According to The Texas Tribune via CBS 19, a bill that made it out of the Texas House Higher Education Committee gained no ground in the full House. Per the report, state representative Lyle Larson declined to ask for a hearing on the bill – effectively killing it.But Larson explained that the “true intention” of the bill wasn’t to mandate a law, but rather to get the schools to engage in talks over resuming the series. Larson added that he has been in contact with administrators of both Texas and Texas A&M, and declared that conversations between the two are “very active.”“The conversations that are happening are very active,” said Larson, who noted he’s been in contact with administrators at both UT and A&M.From 1915 to 2011, the two sides faced each other regularly. Since their first meeting in 1894, Texas and Texas A&M have faced off 118 times.A bill to reinstate a Texas A&M and UT football game never gained ground this #txlege.https://t.co/0SoQCutWNl— Texas Tribune (@TexasTribune) May 7, 2019The Longhorns own the all-time series lead with a 76-37-5 record against the Aggies.If Larson is correct and the two schools are speaking to each other consistently, then we may eventually have a surprise series renewal at some point in the future.The two schools have plenty of open dates for non-conference opponents in 2022 and beyond.Never say never…[The Texas Tribune]last_img read more

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Acne sufferers live longer  research suggests

first_img Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. For many years dermatologists have identified that the skin of acne sufferers appears to age more slowly than in those who have not experienced any acne in their lifetimeDr Simone Ribero, King’s College London Experts had already noted that signs of ageing such as wrinkles and thinning skin often appear much later in people who have experienced acne.Now, scientists believe they may have discovered why.A study of white blood cells taken from individuals affected by spots showed they had longer protective caps on the ends of their chromosomes.Called telomeres, the caps can be compared with the plastic tips that stop shoe laces becoming frayed.They help prevent the chromosomes, packages of DNA, deteriorating and fusing with their neighbours during cell division.Telomeres shrink over time and are closely linked to biological ageing – people with long telomeres age more slowly than people with short ones. The new research shows that acne sufferers tend to have significantly longer telomeres and may therefore be blessed with the gift of long-lasting youthfulness.Lead researcher Dr Simone Ribero, from King’s College London, said: “For many years dermatologists have identified that the skin of acne sufferers appears to age more slowly than in those who have not experienced any acne in their lifetime.”Whilst this has been observed in clinical settings, the cause of this was previously unclear.”Our findings suggest that the cause could be linked to the length of telomeres which appears to be different in acne sufferers and means their cells may be protected against ageing.”By looking at skin biopsies, we were able to begin to understand the gene expressions related to this. Further work is required to consider if certain gene pathways may provide a base for useful interventions.”The study, published in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology, looked at 1,205 female twins, a quarter of whom reported having had acne.One of the genes involved in telomere length was also found to be associated with acne, suggesting that being spotty did not slow ageing itself but flagged up what was happening in a person’s cells.Analysis of skin samples from the twins highlighted a gene pathway called p53, which regulates apoptosis, or “programmed cell death” – a kind of cell suicide.When telomeres become too short, it can trigger a series of events that lead to apoptosis.The p53 pathway was shown to be less active in the skin of acne sufferers, although this is still under investigation.Co-author Dr Veronique Bataille, also from King’s College London, said: “Longer telomeres are likely to be one factor explaining the protection against premature skin ageing in individuals who previously suffered from acne.”Another important pathway, related to the p53 gene, is also relevant when we looked at gene expression in the skin of acne twins compared to twin controls.” Spotty teenagers may have the last laugh over their peers with perfect skin after research found that those who suffer from acne are likely to live longer.Their cells have a built-in protection against ageing which is likely to make them look better in later life, a study has found.By the time she reaches middle age, the spotty girl who could never find a boyfriend could be attracting envious glances from her grey and wrinkly peers.last_img read more